Thomas F. DONNELLY

DONNELLY, Thomas F., M.A., M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
January 1, 1874
Deceased Date
October 9, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Donnelly_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=47969277-16b5-4c4d-8952-7027b8806eb1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician, principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 65 of 65)


May 7, 1926

Mr. DONNELLY:

Yes. Does the hon. member want to read them for himself?

The legislation which this government proposes with regard to the revaluation of soldiers' land I believe to be a step in the right direction. We are practically all agreed that the soldiers' land should be revalued. There are some districts in which the valuation appears to have been done in a just and equitable manner, and where the cry is not so strong for a revaluation. In the constituency which I have the honour to represent I have the privilege of knowing many of these men who were valuing the land for the soldiers, and they have done their work efficiently and well. Though there may be

cases here and there calling for revaluation, there are not many when we take into consideration how the price of land and everything else was enhanced at that time, but there are ether districts where there seems to be something wrong. When we learn from page 26S8 of Hansard, in reply to a question that out of forty-eight parcels of land sold to soldier settlers only nine are being held by the soldiers now, thirty-nine having been thrown up, evidently there is something wrong. The land must have been valued too high, and the soldier has been done an injustice. These men who have been crying ' out to help the soldier have apparently done him an injustice in some districts. The forty-eight parcels of land referred to are in one district only, and there are other districts possibly where conditions are equally bad. It is a necessity that the land should be revalued in such cases. This question should be tackled, and the soldiers given a square deal. To revalue the land in such cases would be only doing what is right and fair. Cases such as are mentioned on page 2688 of Hansard should be investigated, and if we find that any wrong has been done, then even at this late date those who committed the wrong should be brought to justice and be published.

In conclusion, let me say that we are going forward in this country; we are making progress. This country has a great capacity for progress; we have great natural resources to be developed. It needs work, however, and it needs vision. That vision, in the larger sense, I think the present government has shown. I by no means give servile service to any form of government, but let me ask this: Is it not true that the government has

shown wisdom in respect to the tariff, the handling of the railway problem, the financing of this great country, the problem of the revaluation of soldiers' land, the aid for the extension of markets, the effort to broaden trade, and the help given during many years to agriculture-has it not in all these ways, and in many more, done well, and is it not entitled to the confidence of the members of this House and of the country at large?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 7, 1926

Mr. DONNELLY:

Well, this is from Hansard. I thought I was quoting it correctly, but I may have made a mistake. Then the hon. member proceeded to compare the prices of wheat in Minneapolis and Winnipeg respectively for the crop year 1920-21, and from those prices he argued that the tariff imposed by the United States caused the price of wheat there to be greater than in Canada. Now, these are the facts of the case. The only time to make a true comparison is when we had free trade in this commodity between Canada and the United States, which was in the years I am now going to give the figures for. These figures in each case are for the crop year ending August 31, and show the average price:

Crop Year Winnipeg Minneapolis1913-14 89.4 90.9A little higher. 1914-15 132.3 133.4A little higher there again. 1915-16 113.3 117.4Quite a , bit higher in Minneapolis that year. 1916-17 205.6 218.4

In every one of those years the average price under free trade was higher in Minneapolis than in Winnipeg. In fact western farmers have often wondered why it was so. Practically it has always been so.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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March 29, 1926

Mr. DONNELLY:

My profession is that

of medical practitioner. I have travelled through this district and have seen many families where the women and children have not been to town for four, five, six, and even seven years. The reason for it is that it requires three or four days to make a trip of sixty miles with a horse and rig and costs too much. Therefore they do not go into town; they cannot get in. It is almost essential for these people that an opportunity be afforded them of getting a cheap automobile or a cheap truck in order to be able to get into town and carry on their business. I would therefore urge upon the government that they provide a means whereby our people may be able to purchase a cheap automobile or a cheap truck. Then we may render contented settlers of the class to which I have referred and save them for our country till the railway is built.

I shall only say in conclusion that the automobile industry is expecting a reduction of the duty on automobiles. We read this in the press and we hear it on the street. The people themselves are expecting such a reduction. Why then should we disappoint them? Why not give them a reduction in the tariff? Let me say that although production in the automobile trade during the month of February has been the greatest, with the exception of one month in the whole history of the industry, yet the public generally and the automobile dealers are not buying automobiles, believing that the duty is going to be cut, and that on that account there will be a downward tendency in the price of automobiles. Let me therefore say to this government, "Do not wait for any tariff advisory board to investigate the situation and to recommend what should be done." Let the

government act and act at once, in order that the public generally may know where they stand with regard to the prices of automobiles. Let them get down to business, so that the country may get back to normal conditions.

Topic:   LIST OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS AND OTHERS SUPPLYING MATERIALS TO
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March 29, 1926

Mr. THOMAS DONNELLY (Willow Bunch):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to speak

briefly in favour of this motion now before the House to reduce the tariff on automobiles and motor trucks. My chief reason for speaking in favour of this motion is because of what it costs the people of Canada to have this automobile industry in this country. The hon. member for Macleod (Mr. Coote) quoted statistics this afternoon showing that in the year 1924 it cost the people of Canada something like $20,000,000 to have this automobile, industry in Canada. Now $20,000,000 is a lot of money. Twenty million dollars would complete the Hudson Bay railway twice over. Twenty million dollars would pay one-half the deficit on the Canadian National Railways; it would pay also the interest on the bonded money it would take to deepen the St. Lawrence waterway. That is one reason why we are asking for a reduction in the tariff. We are told, however, that if we reduce the

Duty on Automobiles

tariff on automobiles we will have to reduce the tariff on many other articles that enter into their construction; the tariff items are so inter-related that when a change is made in one an adjustment of others becomes necessary. This only goes to show that a protective tariff is like a malignant disease. When it once becomes rooted in the country it spreads and permeates other lines of business, with the result that every industry except the farming industry begins to ask for protection. Now, in the case of a human being the only way to get rid of a malignant disease is to cut it out, and cut it out early. So I say that in the case of a protective tariff on automobiles, or any other industry, the only way to get rid of it is to cut it out root and branch- cut it out early and do away with protection.

But I wish to refer particularly to the manner in which the automobile industry affect? the constituency which I have the honour to represent, the constituency of Willow Bunch This constituency extends for something like 106 miles along the northern Montana boundary line. Twenty years ago it was nothing but a bald prairie; it was not even surveyed. In the year 1908 it was opened for homestead entry but not until about the year 1911, that is 15 years ago, did the cultivation of the land begin. Now we have two lines of railway traversing this constituency. We have our little towns, our churches, our schools, our hospitals, and our telephone lines radiating throughout the country; and for the last five years this constituency has exported more wheat and better wheat than any other electoral district in western Canada. We also have 100 miles of railway traversing the constituency, and this stretch of railway ships more wheat from the producer than any other line of equal extent in the world. I simply mention these facts to show the House that the soil of Willow Bunch is fitted for the growth of wheat, and that the climatic conditions are ideal for the growth of good wheat. The people who live within fifteen or twenty miles of the railway have mostly all the land under cultivation, and a few years since- some seven or eight years ago-when we were told by our Conservative friends that the farmers in the country to the south were prospering, many of our settlers left their farms ?-d went down there. Unfortunately, as a result, they went broke. Some of their neighbours here in Canada are helping to bring them back. They are coming back again now. The stream has turned northward. Now we have immigrants Coming into our country and settling there. Just in this connection I may say that at one of our meetings in the last

election we heard from Conservative orators how hard up our farmers were. Seated in the audience were eight of these people who had returned from the south, and how they must have laughed when they heard how prosperous the farmers were in the country from which they had just come. As I say, these people are returning to that district and trying to make homes there. The settlers who remained during the last three or four years are going ahead and becoming a happy, prosperous and contented people. That is the best asset that any country can have.

There is, however, another portion of this constituency which lies twenty, thirty, forty, yes, sixty miles away from the market along the boundary line of Montana. Things are different there; the settlers are too far away from the market. These people went into that country some fifteen years ago and settled there. The promise was made to them that a railway would be built right away. The war broke out and they did not get the promised railway. In 1923 a bill was introduced in this House to build what was known as the Fife lake extension of the Canadian National railway. We know what happened to that bill. It was defeated in the Senate, and the settlers did not get the much looked for railway. In consequence of the defeat of this bill the Canadian National have given up the idea of building into that section. The Canadian Pacific, however, are beginning to show signs of extending a line into the district, -and the people are anxious to see progress made with it in the hope that they may have a railway in the near future. Originally the people who live at that distance from the railway started to raise cattle, as the hon. member for Marquette (Mr. Mullins) said this afternoon. But when they did that 99 per cent of them went broke, and of recent years they have gone into raising wheat. Nevertheless anyone who is engaged in farming knows that men cannot farm and raise wheat twenty, thirty, forty, fifty and even sixty miles from a railway; it is impossible to do it. They are making a 'living and getting along, -but it is most essential that these people should have motor trucks in order to be -able to haul their wheat to market. We find as we travel from one of these towns to the south that we will meet probably twenty, thirty, forty, and even one hundred motor trucks hauling wheat to the town. But these people come into contact with American farmers and they find that a truck which costs $800 in the United States cannot be bought for less than approximately $1,200 in Canada; and an automobile which costs -in the neighbourhood of $1,500 in Can-

Duty on Automobiles

ada can be obtained in the United States for $1,000. Is it any wonder that these people begin to say, "the automobile industry is against us, the railways are against us, yes, every man's hand is against us" and they are almost inclined to give up hope of ever obtaining any relief in this country.

Topic:   LIST OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS AND OTHERS SUPPLYING MATERIALS TO
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March 29, 1926

Mr. DONNELLY:

Surely they do. We have cheaper freight rates now in Canada than they have in the States; we have the cheapest freight rates in the world in this country.

Topic:   LIST OF CANADIAN MANUFACTURERS AND OTHERS SUPPLYING MATERIALS TO
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