Thomas F. DONNELLY

DONNELLY, Thomas F., M.A., M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
January 1, 1874
Deceased Date
October 9, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Donnelly_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=47969277-16b5-4c4d-8952-7027b8806eb1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician, principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 65)


March 22, 1943

Mr. DONNELLY:

Again, in his speech the hon. member referred to the fact that free enterprise in the nineteendhirties brought the people out there to be hewers of wood and drawers of water, put them in debt so they would never get out, and so on. I live right beside the hon. member; my constituency borders on, his. It was not any legislation which caused this condition; it was because we had no crops. When they spoke of "poverty in the midst of plenty" in those times, my people used just to laugh, because the only plenty we had in those days was plenty of dust, plenty of wind, and plenty of poverty; there were no crops at all. Let me here acknowledge the wonderful way in which we were treated in those times of depression and famine by easterners, and by both governments. Liberal and Conservative administrations alike used us well, and we were thankful and grateful to them for what they did, because at that time it was an act of God with which we were confronted; we had no crops whatever. To say that such conditions arose as a result of free enterprise or some policies which were adopted at that time-well, it is ridiculous.

Let us now see what a better authority than the hon. member for Weyburn says. I have here a copy of a report of the Searle Grain company quoting from a speech of the Hon. Sumner Welles. In an address he made in New York on October 7, 1941, this is what he said was the cause of our trouble in, the 'thirties:

Many foreign countries, which had not recovered from the shock of our tariff increases in 1921 and 1922-

That is, tariff increases in the United States.

and were tottering on the brink of economic and financial collapse, were literally pushed into the abyss by our tariff action of 1930. Throughout the world this withering blast of trade destruction brought disaster and despair to countless people.

The resultant misery, bewilderment, and resentment, together with other equally pernicious contributing causes, paved the way for the rise of those very dictatorships which have plunged almost the entire world into war.

The report continues:

It merely requires to be added that Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Brazil, and the Argentine, rapidly followed the example of the United States with similar high tariffs and with other obstructions to trade, and that the example then spread to almost every country in the *world.

This is the cause of the depression in the 'thirties as given by Under Secretary of State Sumner Welles.

I want to refer only to one other statement, because if I were to answer all the piffling remarks which the hon. member made here, it would take up all my time, and I wish to go on with my own speech. He refers to the fact that the Liberal government put a tariff of one cent a gallon on light crude oil coming in from the United States. I happen to know something about that. Years ago I had something to do with the' investigation concerning gasoline, if I remember rightly.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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March 22, 1943

Mr. DONNELLY:

Oh, yes, we have. I come from that province, and I know whereof I speak. We have pensions for the blind; we have unemployment insurance; we have old age pensions. Of course those are in effect all over Canada, but in addition we have workmen's compensation, to which I have already referred, and also mothers' allowances, allowances for dependent children and, besides, what we call our municipal doctors. In Saskatchewan we have 107 municipal doctors; in fact in my constituency there are only three medical men who are not municipal doctors. These municipal doctors are doctors hired by the people, paid by the municipality, who do all the medical work except major operations, in connection with which they receive fifty per cent of the ordinary fee. They also carry on the health work, visiting the schools once a year, examining the children and filling out their cards, showing that a child is deficient in this or that respect; looking at their tonsils and adenoids, seeing that they are vaccinated, and so on. Why, there are eight municipalities m Saskatchewan which even pay for the hospitalization, and for all major operations too. Then in Saskatchewan we have free tubercular hospitals, by arrangement between our municipalities and the provincial government, and in my opinion we have the best hospitals of that kind and the best record of any province in the dominion. More than that, our death rate from tuberculosis has been far lower than that of the other provinces, and it would be much lower this year if we could exclude the Indians. But in my province we have many Indians, among whom the death rate from tuberculosis is very high, which keeps the general death rate higher. In addition, we have free insane asylums.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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March 22, 1943

Mr. DONNELLY:

I will tell the hon. member about it.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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July 15, 1942

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain) moved:

That for the remainder of the session all private bills from the Senate when received from that house be read a first and second time and be referred forthwith and that standing order 105 respecting the posting of bills be suspended in relation thereto.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRIVATE BILLS-PROCEDURE WITH RESPECT TO FIRST AND SECOND READINGS-SUSPENSION OF STANDING ORDER 105
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June 10, 1942

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain) moved:

That the second and third reports of the standing committee on miscellaneous private bills, presented on June 8, be now concurred in.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS COMMITTEE
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