Thomas F. DONNELLY

DONNELLY, Thomas F., M.A., M.D., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
January 1, 1874
Deceased Date
October 9, 1948
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Donnelly_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=47969277-16b5-4c4d-8952-7027b8806eb1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician, principal, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Willow Bunch (Saskatchewan)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Wood Mountain (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 65)


March 2, 1944

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain):

Some time ago the Minister of Trade and Commerce announced in the house that he expected to increase the quota for western wheat to eighteen bushels to the acre. When does he expect to do it7

Topic:   AMENDMENT OP REGULATIONS RESPECTING DELIVERY QUOTAS
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May 28, 1943

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain) moved:

That the first report of the standing committee on agriculture and colonization, presented to the house on Wednesday, May 26, be concurred in.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
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March 25, 1943

Mr. DONNELLY:

The hon. member for Broadview. I do not know what he is complaining about. As to the correctness of the rest of the statement, I leave it to the house.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24
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March 25, 1943

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain):

Yesterday the hon. member for Broadview spoke in the house as follows, as reported at page 1516 of Hansard:

I wish to call to the attention of the house a speech made on March 22 by a friend of mine, the hon. member for Wood Mountain (Mr. Donnelly). I should like to read the words about which I complain, which appear at page 1447 of Hansard, and then to say a few words in order to indicate that the hon. gentleman has made a grave error. The hon. member said: "Let me turn for a moment to other members of the government. I remember back in 1927 and 1928 or thereabouts when our navy consisted of the Rainbow and the Niobe, the hon. member for Broadview (Mr. Church) spoke in this house and referred to our navy as consisting of these two ships and he asked: Where is our fleet now? And he answered in derision: Tied up in a garage at Halifax. Ah, but he does not say that now. Our fleet is to-day doing a man-sized job, sailing and patrolling the seven seas, and we are all proud of it. It is doing forty per cent of the convoy work in the north Atlantic. We are proud of our navy and the work it is doing, and hon. gentlemen do not deride it and poke fun at it to-day as they did in 1927 and 1928. It has grown from the two ships we had then to the splendid fleet we have now."

The hon. member then goes on to say: Not one word in the paragraph is correct.

I do not know what he is complaining about. Further down on the same page he is reported as follows:

My remarks about Halifax were made on June 21, 1926, at which time I said that if we were going to become an independent country under the statute of Westminster any foreign fleet might sail up the St. Lawrence and we could not oppose it because our navy might be locked up in a garage at Halifax.

I turn now to Hansard of February 1, 1928, at page 103, where I find the following:

We have a contemptible little navy which hugs the shores, never leaves our coasts, and for the past year has been locked up in a garage at Halifax.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. DONNELLY REFERENCE TO REMARKS OF MEMBER FOR BROADVIEW ON QUESTION OF PRIVILEGE ON MARCH 24
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March 22, 1943

Mr. T. F. DONNELLY (Wood Mountain):

I listened with a great deal of interest this afternoon to the hon. member for Davenport (Mr. MacNicol) speaking on the subject of prairie farm rehabilitation. I want to thank him for his kind remarks. I remember that in 1933 or 1934, rising from my seat a little to the rear, I referred to the necessity of making a survey of southern Saskatchewan in order to find out whether it should be farmed or not. I then advised the government of the day, which was led by Mr. Bennett, that if they decided that that section of the country was not fit to be farmed, the inhabitants should be moved out, and that if they decided that it was fit to be farmed they should show the farmers how to farm the land. The result was that the next year the government of the Right Hon. R. B. Bennett let a contract for two dams in the southern section, one at Eastend, I believe, and the other at Valmarie; and from that has grown up what is known as prairie farm rehabilitation. It has done a great

The Budget-Mr. Donnelly

work; it has been expanding and has expanded until we now have a great system of small dams and small dug-outs throughout Saskatchewan, helping farmers to raise stock by providing them with plenty of water.

The hon. member for Davenport wanted to know what he could do to help the government to hurry through with its programme of business. Well, I have been here the same length of time, namely thirty-seven days, as he has this session, and this is the first occasion on which I have made a speech. If the hon. member would do the same as I have done we should get through much quicker and transact a great deal more business. I believe that he has spoken six or seven times this session. If I take up forty minutes in the thirty-seven days I have been here, I shall have just about occupied all the time to which any one member is entitled. But if certain hon. members speak for forty minutes seven or eight times in the session, of course it takes a long time and the business does not go very fast.

I listened to the speech of the hon. membei for Weyburn (Mr. Douglas) this afternoon. He seems to have a word on his mind which has been there for a number of years and which to-day he used continually. I refer to the word " bogeyman." He must have used it nine or ten times to-day. I wonder whether he remembers that he also used it away back in 1937. At that time we were trying to get some estimates for national defence through the house, but we had great difficulty in doing so. Let me quote from what the hon. member said at that time, to show that, as things turned out, he was not blessed with much of the prophetic spirit. As reported in Hansard of February 19, 1937, at page 1063, he said:

Against whom are we arming? What potential aggressor is more aggressive to-day? Oh, I know that bogeymen have been trotted out in this chamber. It has been suggested that it might be Italy, it might be Germany, it might be Japan.

What a prophet!

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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