Robert Joseph OGLE

OGLE, Robert Joseph, O.C., S.O.M., B.A., D.Cn.L, LL.D., J.C.D.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Saskatoon East (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
December 24, 1928
Deceased Date
April 1, 1998
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ogle
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=45e90540-93ee-4744-a312-0b927d261bda&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
missionary, priest

Parliamentary Career

May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
NDP
  Saskatoon East (Saskatchewan)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Saskatoon East (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 74)


March 13, 1984

1. With reference to the annual report of the Canadian International Development Agency under "Special Contributions" did the Agency make such contributions to the International Atomic Energy Agency and, if so, did such contributions rise from nil three years ago to $400,000 in 1980-81 and to $520,000 in 1981-82?

2. For what purposes are these contributions used?

3. Are these contributions consistent with the Agency's mandate?

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
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March 9, 1984

Mr. Bob Ogle (Saskatoon East):

Mr. Speaker, a crucial factor in Third World development is the work of women. In Africa, 80 per cent of the agricultural work is done by women. In all Third World countries over 50 per cent of the non-imported food is grown by women. In Benin, Burundi, and Liberia, significantly more women are in the labour force than there are men. In Kenya, Lesotho, and Botswana, women head one-third of the families. Actually, over one billion women in Third World countries live in rural areas with agriculture as their primary occupation. In Southeast Asia and West Africa women dominate rural market trade upon which local economies and families are sustained. Third World women have a vital influence on the quality of education, nutrition, and health care.

Cultural patterns in both the North and the South have conditioned people to regard men as the primary movers in economic and social progress. This cultural mind-set has blinded many people to the enormous latent power of women to effect change, if given a helping hand.

At this time the president of CIDA is a woman, Margaret Catley-Carlson. Women are rare in other significant areas of CIDA, however. I suggest that this policy be rescinded and that a far greater emphasis be placed on Canadian women in leadership roles in CIDA programs and projects.

I call on the Government to act on recent OECD guiding principles to aid agencies so that women are brought into decision-making for the design, development, and implementation of projects. Take affirmative action. Place more women in decision-making roles in CIDA. Canada's program could produce much more and better development.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY
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March 9, 1984

Mr. Ogle:

Mr. Speaker, with all due respect to my colleague, I would say no. I think my response reflects the idea of all civil libertarian groups I know in Canada, as well as bar associations and other groups.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ACT
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March 9, 1984

Mr. Ogle:

Mr. Speaker, I would just say I agree with what the Member said.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ACT
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March 9, 1984

Mr. Ogle:

Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for the question. I cannot say if there has been any information which has come back from those two schools. However, I think it is interesting to know the history of those schools. In 1969 Nelson Rockefeller was asked to make a report on the whole of Latin America before the Alliance for Progress went into effect. After he made his report it was made a condition of the Alliance for Progress program that countries would receive aid if they were against communism. They would have to prove that they were against communism.

The two schools I speak of are where people were trained to find a way to bring about the total destruction of communism. Now, of course I speak about it in simplicity, but the people who became the communists were the people who were asking questions. They may have been communists, but in my experience the majority of the people were the poor, the oppressed and those who wanted a better deal, a change. But when they started asking for a change they became the subversives. The people who brought about the attack against them, and I have spoken to many of them, have told me that they learned how to do it at either one of those two places.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN SECURITY INTELLIGENCE SERVICE ACT
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