Arthur John LEWIS

LEWIS, Arthur John, B.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive
Constituency
Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
March 12, 1879
Deceased Date
November 8, 1961
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_John_Lewis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4516a7aa-6abd-49e2-b507-6d82ce31249d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
clergyperson, manager, secretary

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 125 of 127)


April 21, 1922

Mr. LEWIS:

I do not care whether the minister communicates with Mr. Larkin by cable or otherwise, but I do think that this press report from the special correspondent of The Gazette in London should be either retracted or confirmed; for if it is authentic it is a reflection on the people of the West. The matter should be cleared up for their sake.

Topic:   DATE OF THE BUDGET
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April 21, 1922

Mr. LEWIS:

I do not wish to prolong this debate nor to delay the passing of the agricultural estimates, but yesterday reference was made to the cattle embargo removal in Great Britain, and I had my attention drawn to-day to a certain article in the press giving statements made by the Hon. P. C. Larkin, High Commissioner for Canada, on this subject. The statements that he made reflect upon the honour, integrity and loyalty of the prairie provinces, and I take exception to them. I wish, furthermore, to place this matter before the Government in order to be informed if they understand that Mr. Larkin is making such threats. We are quite prepared to believe that it is in the interest of all Canadians that the embargo should be removed; but we do not believe that the High Commissioner has a right to make a threat to the British Government at the expense of the prairie provinces. The article reads:

Representations of the strongest character concerning the effect which failure to remove the embargo on cattle would produce in Canada have been made to the British Cabinet by Hon. P. C. Larkin. The new High Commissioner has assured the Ministers that the Government's failure to redeem its pledge to remove the cattle ban would place a potential weapon of considerable power in the hands of the annexationists of the Prairie provinces-

Why the prairie provinces?

-and other foes in Canada of the imperial connection. It is understood that he has conveyed to the Cabinet the strong feeling which exists that the decision to leave the question to the free vote of the British Parliament is not regarded by Canada as fully implementing the Government's promise, as given by Lord Ernie during the war. The proposed resolution favoring the lifting of the embargo will probably pass the Commons, and may even pass the House of Lords if Canada makes its demand sufficiently strong, but even then it would be necessary to introduce and pass a bill to carry out the sense of the resolution, and such a measure would be bitterly contested.

Hon. Mr. Larkin has already made a good impression here and the High Commissioner's office seems in a fair way to become the positive force for the advancement of Canada's interests and ends.

Well, if that is the impression that Hon. Mr. Larkin is making, the sooner he is recalled the better. The minister of. Agriculture is a loyal citizen of the West and is interested in the prairie provinces, and I call this matter to his attention in the hope that he will not allow it to pass unnoticed by this Parliament. It is a reflection upon

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the integrity and loyalty of the prairie provinces; we on this side of the House take great exception to the remarks I have quoted.

Topic:   DATE OF THE BUDGET
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April 21, 1922

Mr. LEWIS:

Will the minister tell us why there is an increase of $30,000 in two of the items comprised in this vote?

Topic:   HOG CHOLERA-SWINE DESTROYED, COMPENSATION, ETC.
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April 20, 1922

Mr. LEWIS:

I want to assure the minister in the beginning that I am not seeking any grant for exhibitions; I am simply standing on my feet in order to get certain information. A great deal has been said this afternoon and evening in regard to mixed farming. I happen to represent a part of southern Saskatchewan where we believe that mixed farming is going to be the salvation of that district. One hon. member said this afternoon that, if we were not able to grow wheat, we might as well shut up shop; but if we can only grow wheat in southern Saskatchewan, we might as well get out. We believe that, if we can enter into mixed farming, as has been advocated by the Minister of Agriculture, we can get a living olf the soil; but there is one thing that is bothering us at the present time. We understand that the Minister of Agriculture is going to establish demonstration farms on a small scale in the dry area of southern Saskatchewan and to encourage growing sunflowers and corn and the building of silos for feed for stock. I also understand that the Dominion government is going to lend sires of pure breeds for dairying purposes, etc. At the same time, the difficulty that we see in the way is this. In every small community we have about five or six farmers who are engaged in mixed farming, and they are the ones who are making good; but, because of low prices of grain last year, many others went into mixed farming, saving all the cream that they could possibly save in order to get a little money, with the result that, instead of their getting the amount of money they expected for cream, butter and eggs, they got about fifteen to twenty cents per pound for butter and about the same per dozen for eggs. The question that we are concerned with is this. If all the people of southern Saskatchewan enter into mixed farming, as has been advocated by many agriculturists as the salvation of our western country, where are we going to find markets? Has the minister any scheme or has he thought of any outlet whereby we can get rid of our surplus stock over local needs? That is the pressing question for us at the present

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time; and as I look over this estimate, I am not able to see where he has made any arrangement for getting larger markets for the product that will naturally result from people entering into this mixed farming which he advocates. If the minister can assure us that he has some scheme in view, or that the Government as a whole intends to open up larger markets that will give a fair return for the products that we expect to raise from mixed farming, then I believe that our people in southern Saskatchewan, as well as in other parts of the country, will take up mixed farming with a better heart and a greater will.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENITENTIARY ACT AMENDMENT
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April 7, 1922

Mr. LEWIS:

The suggestion has been made that the amount of this vote seems rather large, but considering the importance of agriculture I do not think it is at all excessive. In tact, I think it could be largely increased with a great amount of profit to the agrarian interests of Canada. The minister, speaking of the farm at Swift Curent, said that it was in a very primitive state. Did I understand him to say that a sum would be included in the Supplementary Estimates to provide this farm with buildings, or is the amount for that purpose included in the general vote for experimental farms?

Topic:   PENITENTIARY ACT AMENDMENT
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