Henry Byron MCCULLOCH

MCCULLOCH, Henry Byron

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Pictou (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
July 24, 1877
Deceased Date
May 5, 1962
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Byron_McCulloch
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=4312a6c5-011e-4198-9408-038d3fc3eb0a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
merchant

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Pictou (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 13)


April 2, 1957

Mr. McCulloch (Pictou):

Oh, oh.

Topic:   ANDRE MICHEL ALLARD
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March 6, 1957

1. What is the estimated total federal government expenditure for the fiscal year 1957-1958 on roads, bridges and grade separations?

2. Of the total amount, approximately how much will be paid to provincial governments; and how much directly by the federal government for work under its jurisdiction?

FURNITURE PURCHASES & SALES

Question No. 204-Mr. Fraser (Peterborough):

1. What office equipment, such as desks, chairs, filing cabinets, etc., has been purchased by the government since January 1, 1956?

2. What was the value of this equipment?

3. Has any or all of it been disposed of through Crown Assets Disposal Corporation or by any other means?

4. If so, to what firms or individuals was it sold?

5. What quantity was sold to each individual or firm, and at what price in each case?

Topic:   HIGHWAY AND BRIDGE EXPENDITURES
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January 22, 1957

Mr. H. B. McCulloch (Pictou):

Mr. Speaker, the town of Westville, in Pictou county, Nova Scotia, was incorporated in 1894. It has a population of 4,300 as shown in the last census. Since its founding by miners of Scottish and Irish descent who were the forefathers of its present people the town was built and developed, and is solely dependent on the operation of its mines to maintain and stabilize its economy.

The miners of Westville have long been noted for many sterling qualities, the main one being that throughout the years Westville mines have consistently operated without strikes or tie-ups. The highest production was maintained consistent with operating conditions, and labour relations between management and the men was always of the highest order. These desirable features do not just happen, and the very valid reason

The Address-Mr. H. B. McCulloch for them is the stability of the men, the thriftiness of their families, pride in the ownership of their own homes and active participation in church and community life in general, all of which qualities have been handed down to them from past generations. It is a known fact that the percentage of miners who own their homes in the town of Westville exceeds 80 per cent, which is probably double or more than that of any other mining town in eastern Canada.

Today, with the mines closed except for minor operations of removing pillars from existing slopes, these people who saved their money and built their own homes, primarily without government assistance of any kind, now find their town bankrupt because they have no work and they are unable to pay their taxes. They are faced with the closing of their schools, which will result in uneducated children, the deterioration of their water, impaired sanitary facilities and other services, and the loss of their homes and churches.

The town of Westville has underneath its limits a proven quantity of at least eight million tons of the best coal in Pictou county, if not in the province of Nova Scotia. Unfortunately, to mine this deposit economically requires an estimated expenditure of approximately $2,500,000. If such an expenditure were made, not only would a highly mechanized and modern mine be available if required for a national emergency, but also the Canadian citizens of Westville could look forward to the future feeling secure that they could maintain their homes and town.

In view of world conditions today it is felt that development of this mine is necessary to help guarantee the full use of our production facilities should a major war break out. This in itself would warrant government action now. In addition, it is a known fact that two other Pictou county mines, now active in a small way, will be depleted and closed within the next three years. A new mine development would absorb these men when their present jobs are closed out.

It is presently contemplated to double the size of the existing power plant at Trenton and, in fact, materials have been ordered for this purpose. When this installation is completed its daily coal requirements will exceed the entire output of the only remaining mine in the county which can carry on operations for an indefinite period. This alone would warrant a new development now to ensure our other plants of continued operations.

On behalf of the people of Westville I urge the government of Nova Scotia to assist in the opening of a new mine in that town. I feel that the government of Canada should

be prepared to assist, too, if so requested by the operating company and the government of Nova Scotia. Money made available for this purpose would not be a gift or donation; it would be a sound investment in the good people of Westville for the benefit of all Canada.

Furthermore, my request is substantiated by the Gordon commission report, which states that only modern mechanized mines can hope to remain in operation, and that government assistance to maritime industry is most essential. In view of these facts, and the bankrupt position of the town of Westville today, I urge that immediate action be taken to assure these people that their present position is of a temporary nature, and that the governments of Nova Scotia and bf Canada are prepared to lend temporary aid as I have just suggested.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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January 22, 1957

Mr. H. B. McCulloch (Pictou):

Mr. Speaker, the town of Westville, in Pictou county, Nova Scotia, was incorporated in 1894. It has a population of 4,300 as shown in the last census. Since its founding by miners of Scottish and Irish descent who were the forefathers of its present people the town was built and developed, and is solely dependent on the operation of its mines to maintain and stabilize its economy.

The miners of Westville have long been noted for many sterling qualities, the main one being that throughout the years Westville mines have consistently operated without strikes or tie-ups. The highest production was maintained consistent with operating conditions, and labour relations between management and the men was always of the highest order. These desirable features do not just happen, and the very valid reason

The Address-Mr. H. B. McCulloch for them is the stability of the men, the thriftiness of their families, pride in the ownership of their own homes and active participation in church and community life in general, all of which qualities have been handed down to them from past generations. It is a known fact that the percentage of miners who own their homes in the town of Westville exceeds 80 per cent, which is probably double or more than that of any other mining town in eastern Canada.

Today, with the mines closed except for minor operations of removing pillars from existing slopes, these people who saved their money and built their own homes, primarily without government assistance of any kind, now find their town bankrupt because they have no work and they are unable to pay their taxes. They are faced with the closing of their schools, which will result in uneducated children, the deterioration of their water, impaired sanitary facilities and other services, and the loss of their homes and churches.

The town of Westville has underneath its limits a proven quantity of at least eight million tons of the best coal in Pictou county, if not in the province of Nova Scotia. Unfortunately, to mine this deposit economically requires an estimated expenditure of approximately $2,500,000. If such an expenditure were made, not only would a highly mechanized and modern mine be available if required for a national emergency, but also the Canadian citizens of Westville could look forward to the future feeling secure that they could maintain their homes and town.

In view of world conditions today it is felt that development of this mine is necessary to help guarantee the full use of our production facilities should a major war break out. This in itself would warrant government action now. In addition, it is a known fact that two other Pictou county mines, now active in a small way, will be depleted and closed within the next three years. A new mine development would absorb these men when their present jobs are closed out.

It is presently contemplated to double the size of the existing power plant at Trenton and, in fact, materials have been ordered for this purpose. When this installation is completed its daily coal requirements will exceed the entire output of the only remaining mine in the county which can carry on operations for an indefinite period. This alone would warrant a new development now to ensure our other plants of continued operations.

On behalf of the people of Westville I urge the government of Nova Scotia to assist in the opening of a new mine in that town. I feel that the government of Canada should

be prepared to assist, too, if so requested by the operating company and the government of Nova Scotia. Money made available for this purpose would not be a gift or donation; it would be a sound investment in the good people of Westville for the benefit of all Canada.

Furthermore, my request is substantiated by the Gordon commission report, which states that only modern mechanized mines can hope to remain in operation, and that government assistance to maritime industry is most essential. In view of these facts, and the bankrupt position of the town of Westville today, I urge that immediate action be taken to assure these people that their present position is of a temporary nature, and that the governments of Nova Scotia and bf Canada are prepared to lend temporary aid as I have just suggested.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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August 10, 1956

1. Have any provincial governments signed agreements since June 27, 1956, pursuant to the amended Trans-Canada Highway Act which received royal assent on June 7, 1956?

2. It so, which provincial governments have so signed?

3. Which provincial governments have signed agreements to date under the amended statute?

Answer by: Mr. Bourgei, Parliamentary

Assistant, for the Minister of Public Works:

1. Yes.

2. Ontario.

3. Agreements have been concluded with the provincial governments of Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta. Nova Scotia has returned a signed agreement but with a revision in schedule "A", the detailed designation of the route of the trans-Canada highway in the province. British Columbia has submitted only a revised schedule "A". Before agreements can be signed with these provinces, further clarification of the schedules "A" is required.

[The following items were passed in committee of supply]:

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA HIGHWAY PROVINCIAL AGREEMENTS
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