Wilbert Ross AYLESWORTH

AYLESWORTH, Wilbert Ross

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Frontenac--Addington (Ontario)
Birth Date
January 1, 1892
Deceased Date
February 5, 1973
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wilbert_Ross_Aylesworth
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=3d711546-f3de-417d-bd6c-4c9fabacdd96&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Frontenac--Addington (Ontario)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Frontenac--Addington (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Frontenac--Addington (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 17)


May 14, 1953

Mr. Aylesworlh:

Mr. Chairman, I just want to say a few words about the farm income tax inspectors, or as they are better known, the income tax snoopers.

In 1949, just before the last election, the house was informed that the Department of National Revenue had no inspectors or enforcement officers, but that they did have an intelligence branch which had officers stationed in most of the provinces, with an extra 17 stationed in Ottawa for service anywhere. At that time there was a total of 54 officers. Twenty-three were in Ontario, three in Alberta, British Columbia and Quebec, two in New Brunswick and Saskatchewan, one in Manitoba and none in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island.

I do not know whether or not the questions asked in 1949 gave the government ideas, but in answer to a question which I asked I found out that we now have income tax inspectors in every province of Canada, and in greatly increased numbers. There are now four times the number of snoopers there were in 1949, despite the fact that farm income has dropped and there are fewer farms. I am quite sure that many of these farms became vacant and many of the farmers

5400 HOUSE OF

Supply-National Revenue reduced production due to the prying of these snoopers. The loss of our markets may be indirectly due to the farmers becoming discouraged because of the treatment they received from this department.

We now have a total of 234 income tax inspectors assigned to check the farmers. They cost the taxpayers of Canada $926,433.30, and I am not sure that their activities bring in enough extra money to pay their salaries. Certainly the strain they put on the farmer is doing nothing to bring about the increased production which this government begs from the farmer. The farmer needs encouragement, not hounding.

It is also interesting to note the way in which these snoopers are placed. In Ontario there are 56 full-time inspectors and 9 parttime. Saskatchewan has 51 and Alberta 46 of these costly employees. There are 27 in Manitoba, but only 13 in Quebec. Where there were none in Nova Scotia in 1949, there are now 11. Prince Edward Island, without any in 1949, now has 2. New Brunswick and British Columbia each have 7. Even Newfoundland now has one part-time.

I would like the minister to say if he considers this money well spent. Does he consider the hounding which these snoopers give to the farmers is in the best interest of Canada?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
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May 14, 1953

Mr. Aylesworih:

I wish to point out to the minister that there is a grave housing shortage in Kingston. I understand that the government has been approached to sell some of the land around Kingston penitentiary so that it may be used for a housing project. This land is being farmed, and has been farmed for some years. Hay and grain from it have been used to feed cows which provide milk for the penitentiary. This procedure was all right when the farmers had plenty of outlets for their cheese, butter, milk and so on, but there is no shortage of milk around that district at the present time. The land creates a bottleneck in the plans of Kingston city to provide services for the districts which lie beyond this land.

As the minister knows, there are over 700 acres of land there. The greater part of this land is used only for pasture. Hay has been cut off it for several years and stacked. I remember several years when the hay would

be sold, probably during the fall or the next spring, and would bring about $1 a ton, a price which did not even pay for the gasoline or the feed for the horses while it was being cut.

What I want to bring to the minister's attention is this. As far as I can see, this land has not been of any service either to the penitentiary or to the people of the district. I feel that this land or some portion of it should be turned over to the city for a housing project.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
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May 14, 1953

Mr. Aylesworth:

I want to say a few words about the farm income tax inspectors.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
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May 11, 1953

Mr. Aylesworth:

Why are they not drawing it? In that municipality there are between

1,000 and 1,200 homes; there are many large buildings that cost anywhere between $100,000 up to $300,000 and $400,000 each, and some more than that. Who does the assessing of these government properties? If they are rightly assessed the township of Pittsburgh is entitled to a grant, because to my mind the government property in that township runs to much over 4 per cent of the total assessed property of the township.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   USA-CANADA TRADE BALANCES
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May 11, 1953

Mr. Aylesworth:

Is the municipality or township of Pittsburgh drawing any revenue from this act or order in council?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   USA-CANADA TRADE BALANCES
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