Donald SUTHERLAND

SUTHERLAND, The Hon. Donald, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Oxford South (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 8, 1863
Deceased Date
January 1, 1949
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Sutherland_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=39733e89-5c63-44ea-a981-bc71336702b7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Oxford South (Ontario)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
July 20, 1935 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
  • Minister Without Portfolio (July 13, 1926 - September 24, 1926)
December 11, 1942 - July 2, 1926
PC
  Oxford South (Ontario)
  • Minister Without Portfolio (July 13, 1926 - September 24, 1926)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 394)


June 18, 1926

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

The hon. member was dealing with Spain a moment ago. How is it that the trade returns in agricultural and vegetable products show that our exports to Spain, which in 1921 were $339,900, had decreased to $177,000 in 1925?

Topic:   TRADE AND COMMERCE
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June 18, 1926

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

The trade returns show that in 1921 our exports of agricultural and vegetable products to China amounted to $58,895 and by the year 1925 they had increased to $4,103,000. This is a very substantial increase in tradte with a country with whom we have no trade agreement. Now let us look at the trade with some of the other places that have entered into trade treaties with Canada. For example, our exports of agricultural commodities to Italy in 1921 amounted to $56,579,751, whereas last year, after the treaty had come into effect, it dropped right down to $11,200,000. Surely the minister cannot contend that a trade treaty of that kind is in the interests of this country. What a contrast there is between that slump in trade with Italy and the increase in our business with China, with whom we have no treaty. Again, our exports of similar commodities to France amounted in 1921 to $12,871,679 and last year they had fallen to $4,175,000. These are the facts that we pointed out when the treaties were being put through the House, and we have striking evidence that so far as agriculture is concerned these treaties in every instance have proved disastrous to Canada. That is why we devoted so much attention to the recent trade agreement with Australia and New Zealand. Agriculture has been sacrificed by this government in the case of every treaty they have entered into with a foreign country.

Topic:   TRADE AND COMMERCE
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June 18, 1926

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

Has the bill been reprinted, Mr. Chairman?

Topic:   RED LAKE AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY
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June 18, 1926

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

Before we attempt to pass sections in this way, I think we ought to have the bill printed as it came from the committee. It is rather significant, in view of our railway experience, that the Minister of Railways is not in his seat when this bill is going through, to inform1 us what the policy of the government is in connection with branch lines. I protest against going on with the bill until it has been printed with the amendments in it so that we shall know what we are doing.

Topic:   RED LAKE AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY
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June 18, 1926

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

We ought to have copies of the bill in its amended form in our hands before we proceed with it. We are told that a certain clause is not in the bill, and also that there is another clause to go in which has not been printed. It is quite irregular to pass a bill which has been before the House three or four times and sent back. There is something peculiar about a company attempting to get a charter under such circumstances. There is no such company in existence. The old practice of issuing charters to companies which simply proceed to dispose of their charters has been in effect in this country too long. We are paying the penalty for our mad folly in issuing railway charters in Canada for so many years; and if the rumours are true I think we should be very careful about issuing charters to this company, which has apparently been already endeavouring to dispose of its charter, in the hope that the country affected will develop into a rich mining district. The company have nothing at stake. If the country does not develop as we hope it will, the charter will lapse, and I suppose if they spend $5,000 during the coming year on the road all they will have to do will be to come -back next session and ask for an extern sion. We should have a statement from the Minister of Railways in regard to charters of this kind. We have witnessed the spectacle of the government by order in council issuing a charter for a spur line similar to this to connect with the Transcontinental in Quebec. Surely parliament has some policy in regard to such cases. This is not the original bill we are asked to pass; the chairman says several sections have been struck out and others added. It is a most unusual thing to do.

Topic:   RED LAKE AND NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY COMPANY
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