Donald SUTHERLAND

SUTHERLAND, The Hon. Donald, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Oxford South (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 8, 1863
Deceased Date
January 1, 1949
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Sutherland_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=39733e89-5c63-44ea-a981-bc71336702b7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Oxford South (Ontario)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
July 20, 1935 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Oxford South (Ontario)
  • Minister Without Portfolio (July 13, 1926 - September 24, 1926)
December 11, 1942 - July 2, 1926
PC
  Oxford South (Ontario)
  • Minister Without Portfolio (July 13, 1926 - September 24, 1926)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 393 of 394)


February 9, 1912

Mr. SUTHERLAND.

Would not the value of these screenings be largely enhanced by separating the weed seeds from the broken wheat? I think that could be done by putting the screenings through a finer mesh. I have it on good authority that a great many of those weed seeds ground up into bran and shorts are not only unfit for stock but are actually poisonous. I believe that by more careful screening, a larger proportion of these weed seeds could be extracted. t

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto) moved that the words ' shall weigh not less than 64 pounds to the bushel1 be added to the section defining the grade of No. 1 peas.

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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February 9, 1912

Mr. SUTHERLAND.

When this matter was under discussion in the House the other day, I referred to section 115 dealing with rejected grain. This- section defines rejected grain as follows:

Rejected grain shall comprise all spring wheat for warehousing, but too low in weight or otherwise unfit to he graded as No. 3. This includes seed dirty grain, also screenings from elevators.

I wish to draw the attention of the minister to the importance of regulating the disposal of this rejected grain. One lion, gentleman the .other day said he thought it was covered by the Act for the Inspec-Mr. STAPLES.

tion and Sale of Seeds. I find, on looking over the Act, that it does not cover it. The report of 'the Minister of Agriculture for 1910 deals particularly with rejected grain, in the following terms:

Noxious weed seeds in ground feeding stuffs and screenings from commercial grain, which are distributed for the purpose of stock feeding, have been the cause for some serious complaints during the past year. Investigation thus far would seem to indicate that the causes for these complaints are restricted, quite largely to the province of Ontario, where the screenings from the cereal grains grown in the prairie provinces after being ,recleaned at the large elevators on Lake Superior and elsewhere are marketed.

Again, in his report for 1911, the Minister of Agriculture alludes- to the same cause of complaint, and there states :

I, therefore, instructed my seed commissioner to continue the investigation into the condition of ground feeding stuffs distributed for sale to farmers, and, by collecting and examining samples and by inquiry, to ascertain what practical means, if any, may he adopted to prevent the distribution of vital weed seeds in ground mill feeds. The investigation has shown that, as in previous years bran manufactured by the larger flour mills is comparatively free from weed seeds; but the forty-eight samples of bran collected had an average of two hundred and forty-six weed seeds .per pound. Crushed or ground meals were often found to be in a worse condition, sometimes containing more than eighteen hundred weed seeds par .pound.

These statements 'are enough to convince every one of the importance of careful supervision of this rejected grain which is to be dealt with by the commissioners to be appointed under this Bill. The Minister of Agriculture indicates that Ontario is the greatest sufferer from the purchase of this rejected the weed infested grain from western Canada. Even this year, while the field .crop of Ontario was not as large as those of previous years, the value of that crop almost equalled the fi-eld crop of the three western provinces. These commissioners, dealing as they do with the grading of the grain not only of western Canada, but of the whole of Canada, have, ot ought to have, under their control the disposal of noxious weeds that comprise a large portion of many shipments of grain to the elevators. I believe that there are to-

But this particular evil has been so patent to every one in Ontario during the past few years that something has to be done. I believe that in the Inland Revenue . Act provision is made for looking after the seeds contained in feedstuff by inspectors, but such inspectors are altogether too few in number to attend to this. But there is no provision whatever as far as I can And for preventing the sale or distribution of weed seeds in screenings or unground grains. There is scarcely a town or city in which there are not many people who keep a number of fowl and who buy screenings from the elevators in western Canada. The manure from this source is frequently hauled to the farms and distributed in that way to an extent most people hardly realize. I would, therefore, strongly urge on the hon. minister that some provision be made in this Bill which would enable the commissioners to regulate and control this evil, they are in a better position to do so than anybody else. I am satisfied that the time has arrived when so drastic measure must be adopted in order to prevent this evil from spreading throughout the country.

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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February 6, 1912

Mr. SUTHERLAND.

During recent years a great quantity of these screenings has been purchased through the feed stores in Ontario and as a consequence weed seeds have been spread to an alarming extent. We have to-day in Ontario noxious weeds that were practically unknown six' or seven years ago. Some safeguard should be inserted in this Bill to have the commissioners take charge of this dirty grain so that the weed seeds would be destroyed, perhaps (burned, because they are a dangerous menace to the country.

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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February 6, 1912

Mr. SUTHERLAND.

I notice that subsection 3 of section 115 provides that:

Any grain that is unsound, musty, dirty, smuttv, soroutv, or from any other cause is unfit to be classed under any of the recognized grades shall be classed as ' rejected/

In discussing this, I notice that instead of using the word ' dirty ' the expression "mixed grain' has been used by the hon. member of Trade and Commerce. Under subsection ten of section 126 which we are now discussing it js provided that the owner shall be paid or an allowance made to him in screenings. Now,

I take it that the screenings of grain treated in an hospital elevator are a very important feature of the treatment. I would like to know if provision is made for looking after these screenings, as certainly they are a most dangerous commodity.

We know that in hospitals care is taken to prevent the spread of uxseases. Also 4n packing houses officers are appointed to detect diseased animals and those condemned are sent to the fertilizer tank. These screenings taken from the grain at the elevators are often shipped out and sold for feed. I would ask the minister if any provision is made to safeguard the public against the danger from weed seeds thus distributed.

;HTHR (North Toronto). Yes, there is the supervision of the government ..curs in the first place and then there s the provision that a certain charge is made for the screenings, half a cent a

bushel and all over 5 per cent of the screenings are returned to the owner. If it is not 5 per cent there is no charge for the cleaning. What is under 5 per cent is kept by the cleaner himself so that the value of the screenings inures to the owner and not to the warehouse man. ,

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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February 6, 1912

Mr. SUTHERLAND.

Even when they are ground some very dangerous seeds are so small that they are not destroyed by the crusher or grinder. If 50 per cent of the screenings are good wheat theother 50 per cent may be composed of the most dangerous and objectionable weed seeds. I would think thatthe hospital elevator or the elevator where the wheat is cleaned would bethe proper iplace to take charge of these seeds, and 1 contend that all wheat should be cleaned, that it should not be allowed to come to our Ontario mills uncleaned, for even in that way these weed seeds have been spread to such an alarming

extent as to call for some heroic remedy. I believe that millions of dollars are being lost annually in this province through the spread of noxious weeds. We may as well look this matter squarely in the face and provide some remedy. and the proper place to begin is ait the elevator.

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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