Anton Bernard WESELAK

WESELAK, Anton Bernard, LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Springfield (Manitoba)
Birth Date
February 11, 1918
Deceased Date
January 17, 1989
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Weselak
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=33ad85d3-6c31-4a2e-937e-f26e771cced6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Springfield (Manitoba)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 8)


March 27, 1956

Mr. Weselak:

-can be expected to increase by close to $30 million, with the result that the government will be faced with additional expenditures of roughly $320 million in the coming year.

In the face of these expected additional expenditures the carry-over of a modest surplus of $125 million to the next year can hardly be considered as excessive. When one considers the additional commitments which have been made by this government and which will be payable in the coming year, it is only reasonable and sound financing for the time being at least to preserve the source of revenues with which these additional payments can be met.

The philosophy underlying the 1955 budget was one of boosting the economy by encouraging spending and making more money available to the public for this purpose. The thinking on the other hand in relation to the 1956 budget, I think can best be put in the minister's own words which I think will bear

and deserve repeating. In his budget speech, as reported at page 2327 of Hansard, the minister stated:

The blessings of an economy operating at a high level are pleasant indeed to a minister of finance but they bring with them new responsibilities for all of us. The objective should be to maintain a steady growth in economic activity without the process of expansion giving rise to inflation and instability.

He further stated that "the fiscal policies must continue to be directed towards economic stability".

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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March 27, 1956

Mr. Weselak:

What were you reading from?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Full View Permalink

March 27, 1956

Mr. Weselak:

In spite of the fact that as a member of this house I should like to have seen some relief in taxation this year, I must confess that before the budget was brought down I could not see any room or justification for such action, and contrary to some criticism in the press now, the forecasts in almost all of the same publications at that time coincided with my own opinion.

A certain responsible daily in my own province, whose opinions I often respect, has referred to the budget as not merely a stand-pat budget but a negative budget, and this has been echoed in the Conservative amendment before the house. With this statement I would take issue and propose to do so. The budget, like any other thing within this confused world of ours, is a relative thing and must be judged in the light of the circumstances which affect and surround it.

The positive aspects of the budget are to be found not only in the printed words of the budget but also in what was not said by the minister when the budget was presented to this house. In the printed word we find certain tax and tariff relief to our hard-pressed farmers. Last summer there was criticism in the west of a tariff board ruling which had resulted in certain farm implement parts becoming liable for import duties and sales tax. Government policy has been in the past that parts like the machinery and equipment itself should enter Canada duty free and be exempt from sales tax. The action in this budget on the part of the government to reword the acts in such a way as to restore duty-free entry to these items and of adding further items to the exempt list in accordance with recognized government policy will be welcomed by the farmers of Canada, and will be of some help to them in combating rising costs. The effect of these provisions is to reduce the cost of these items by about 30 per cent which is not an insignificant figure. The removal of sales tax on certain industrial equipment and building materials will also be welcomed by those affected.

The Budget-Mr. Weselak

The recent announcement by the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) that floor prices are to be continued on butter at 58 cents a pound to 1958 was welcome news to the agricultural communities in Canada. The relative benefit as compared to cost fully justifies this action, which certainly is in the national interest. In this connection I note that the Manitoba government by taking advantage of butter provided by the government to institutions at reduced prices effects a saving of $21,142 a year. The Saskatchewan socialist government on the other hand has absolutely refused to co-operate in this matter and continues to use margarine in its provincially-owned institutions. The socialist members here like to refer to themselves as the champions of the farmers-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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March 27, 1956

Mr. Weselak:

-and decry and belittle this government's efforts to assist the farmers. In this respect I would suggest that our socialist friends in this house direct some of their attention to the Saskatchewan government itself and direct some of their criticism in that direction. When Mr. Bentley, the minister of health in Saskatchewan, was asked whether the dairy interests objected he stated: "We've had some letters from them. I sympathize with their viewpoint, but I've still got a little Scot's blood .in my veins".

I would suggest that if the Minister of Agriculture made a statement of that type in this house, he would be accused by our socialist friends of being miserly and of not being interested in the plight of the farmer, and would be told that sympathy alone put no money in the farmers' pockets. They would not hesitate to state that the government was patronizing the packing industries; which manufacture margarine rather than the dairy producers, and was adopting policies designed to benefit the packers rather than the farmers.

I was particularly pleased, Mr. Speaker, with one aspect of the budget which does not appear in the actual print. I refer to the tariff policies which can be read into the budget itself. During the past few years the cry for protection has been steadily growing from individual industries and has now been taken up by the Canadian Manufacturers Association, with the result that developments in this respect are being watched with concern not only by the agricultural industry but by the pulp and paper industry and such industries as the aluminum industry in Canada

The Budget-Mr. Weselak. which rely to a great extent on foreign markets to assure the sale of their products.

While on his tour of western Canada last fall the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew) is reported to have proclaimed as Conservative party national policy the policy of the maximum processing of Canadian raw materials within Canada before export.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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February 23, 1956

Mr. Weselak:

Mr. W. J. Parker is president of the Manitoba pool elevators and also vicepresident of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture. His opinions are highly respected in western Canada.

Topic:   PROVISION FOR GUARANTEE OF BANK LOANS TO PRODUCERS IN PRAIRIE PROVINCES, ETC.
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