Gordon Timlin PURDY

PURDY, Gordon Timlin

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
July 1, 1888
Deceased Date
December 22, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Purdy
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=313739bb-467e-44f3-bcac-89d48216c316&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 41 of 41)


March 17, 1936

Mr. PURDY:

Mr. Chairman, I represent

the riding of Colchester-Hants where the people are very much interested in the lumbering business. Being engaged in that business myself I should like to say a word before this item carries. I was rather amused to hear what hon. members on the opposition benches had to say with respect to our trade with the United States. They refused to accept responsibility for the great drop in our trade with the republic to the south; they said they had nothing to do with it and that it was not a measure of retaliation on the part of the United States which prevented our Canadian lumber from going in. Surely they will grant that when they came into power in 1930 we had a market of $56,000,000 in the United States whereas when they went out of power that market, for lumber and lumber products, had been reduced to $10,000,000. Now they turn around and claim to have saved the lumber industry of Canada by means of the empire trade agreements. But what did those agreements do for our lumber? What they did was to bind the duty already existing on certain classes of material. What has really happened is this, that to-day the price in sterling we are getting in the old country for our lumber is not as favourable as the price we received before the empire agreements came into force. The value of the pound sterling has risen from around $4.25 to about $5. I do not think that our friends in the opposition can take credit for that, and therefore they are not entitled to take credit for any great increase in the export of lumber to the United Kingdom.

My hon. friend from Royal (Mr. Brooks) the other night said that the trade agreement would do the maritimes no good; he said that the people there were still selling lumber to the United Kingdom and could not sell to the United States. If he had inquired further he would have found the reason why the mari-

time lumbermen are to-day able to secure a better market in the old country for their products. The answer was given yesterday by the hon. member for Dauphin (Mr. Ward) when he pointed out that the British Columbia lumbermen are now sending their lumber into the United States, and this having released the pressure on the English market has allowed the maritime lumbermen to sell their products there. So far as the maritime lumbermen are concerned, we are shipping into the United States a good deal more lumber than we did before the treaty was signed. If you will look around in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick you will see a great many lumbermen preparing to ship in the summer when navigation opens up, and therefore as regards the maritimes the treaty will be of considerable benefit.

Topic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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March 17, 1936

Mr. PURDY:

I did not say that.

Topic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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March 17, 1936

Mr. PURDY:

I have in my hand a bulletin issued by the Department of Agriculture of Nova Scotia which shows that in January of this year the price of milch cows in New York state was $85 as compared with $60 a year ago. That will be good news for the dairy farmers of the maritime provinces.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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February 27, 1936

1. Have steps been taken to implement the

second resolution appearing on page 35 of the report of the dominion-provincial conference, 1935, particularly with respect to: (a) "that

the interest upon such loans as have been made, and may be made in the future, be reduced to a rate of 4 per cent per annum"; and (b) "that conditions be relaxed enough to make it possible for farmers to avail themselves of these loans when their security is sufficient"?

2. If not, will such steps be taken?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FARM MORTGAGE LOANS
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