Gordon Timlin PURDY

PURDY, Gordon Timlin

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)
Birth Date
July 1, 1888
Deceased Date
December 22, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gordon_Purdy
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=313739bb-467e-44f3-bcac-89d48216c316&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Colchester--Hants (Nova Scotia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 41)


August 3, 1956

Mr. Purdy:

I just want to say a word with respect to this maritime marshland scheme. This is a project which has been carried on in the maritime provinces for a number of years.

I know that in my own constituency it has already done a tremendous amount of good. You can see a considerable increase in the livestock population. I have every reason to believe that similar circumstances exist in other parts of the province. I hope the work will continue to go forward.

I may say that it seems to me when the engineers first undertook this project they were dealing with something about which they did not know very much. They had not the experience, coming from the west as some of them did, with the tides of the bay of Fundy around which these projects are located. However, they are beginning to become acquainted with the problems and I think the work is now being conducted in a very efficient manner.

In this connection I have before me a resolution which was passed by the Nova Scotia federation of agriculture at its annual meeting at Truro last December. This is resolution No. 2 and reads:

Whereas loss from fresh water erosion continues [DOT] to be a serious problem to farmers throughout the province, and

Whereas there is no provision made to control fresh water erosion as it affects farm land.

Resolved that the federation of agriculture petition the provincial and federal authorities to enact legislation similar to the marshland reclamation act to control fresh water erosion of agricultural land.

My request tonight, Mr. Minister, now that we have a very efficient organization of engineers working on the marshland problem, is that thought should be given to some sort of similar scheme for work on the valleys of our rivers in the maritime provinces where every year, with every flash flood and every freshet in the spring, we are losing a good

many acres of very valuable land. I suppose it could be said that there is a water act under which the federal government will pay 35 per cent and the provinces and municipalities will pay the rest, in order to control floods. I am afraid, however, that there is little chance of any work being done under that act.

We have this engineering staff down there and I know there is a big problem on such rivers as the Salmon, the Shubenacadie, the North, the Stewiacke, the Musqodobit, the Nine Mile and many others. As I say, each year the farmers are losing a lot of their valuable land. I am just asking the minister if he will take under advisement having his engineers, when they are around these other projects, study the nature of these valleys. There are members of the staff there who could develop some workable scheme that would be of immense value to our agriculturists in the maritime provinces.

Perhaps I might also come back to the suggestion of the Prime Minister, that if the Atlantic provinces produce a scheme for their general good the federal government would give serious consideration to it. I am suggesting that possibly this scheme which I have suggested for the benefit of agriculture in those provinces would be a good place to start.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
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August 2, 1956

Mr. Purdy:

Mr. Minister, would you just listen to me. Let him sit back and blat by himself for a while.

Topic:   PIPE LINES
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OP EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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August 2, 1956

Mr. Purdy:

I should like to take this

opportunity to make a few remarks on this resolution, and I promise that I shall not be as lengthy or as inaccurate as the member who has preceded me. I should like, however, to direct a few remarks to the minister whose estimates are before us at the present time not particularly with respect to the problem of northern affairs although coming from Nova Scotia as I do I cannot help but remind the committee that Nova Scotia is one of four provinces, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, which should have more to say with respect to the development of our northern resources than we have because at one time we were equal partners in those great resources. However, at the

moment I wish to direct my remarks to the minister in his capacity as minister of national resources.

As I visualize his responsibility in that position, it covers the development of our renewable resources such as our forests, and of course I appreciate that while our forests are renewable they are only renewable within a limited time. You can cut down forests and it takes a good many years before they will reproduce themselves. Then we have water power, another important national resource and one which we must utilize to the fullest extent. Along with our water power we must consider our non-reproducing natural resources such as coal and similar minerals.

I am going to subdivide our water resources into two parts. First of all, I should like to refer to the water resources found in the natural flow of our rivers, and I am going to refer specifically to the province of Nova Scotia. Here I should like to say that in my opinion the development of hydro power on our non-tidal rivers in Nova Scotia is most uneconomical because in order to provide the necessary storage basins and a level flow of water throughout the year it is necessary to flood such large areas of the river basins that the natural growth in those basins, whether agricultural or forest, is destroyed, and the initial cost of such a development is not a true picture of the actual cost to the economy of the country. In other words, we should consider when we flood such tremendous areas of our province what the potential production of those areas would have been in future years and add that to the cost of the development.

We do have one great source of power in our province which I believe has never been actually explored to the hilt. It is true that an investigation was made, and there is one going on now, of Passamaquoddy bay to see just what we could do to develop power from the tides of the bay of Fundy. A few years ago an investigation was also made on the Petitcodiac and the Memramcook rivers, in New Brunswick. At that time I believe a report was brought in that the development of power there was not economical compared with the development of power from coal, but in that regard I want to make this point. The coal of the maritime provinces, Nova Scotia particularly, is expendable but the tides are not expendable. They have been going out and coming in ever since mankind was created and they will go out and come in just as long as humanity exists.

Therefore I am saying that while it might be more economical to develop power from coal in the immediate future nevertheless

Supply-Northern Affairs from a long-range point of view and knowing that our coal supply is exhaustible I believe the whole situation should be taken into consideration with that in mind. I suppose hon. members will say to me: What has this all got to do with the present situation? They may say that power, after all, is a provincial matter and that therefore the Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources should not be concerned with it. However, I have great hopes from the announcement made by our great Prime Minister that he was fully aware of the financial problems some of the lesser provinces have to meet and that the federal government would go along with those provinces in any way possible to secure their development.

There is another feature. The minister is responsible for the tourist industry. I suggest to him that one of the greatest undeveloped potentials in our national production, or whatever you like to call it, is the undeveloped tourist industry in the maritime provinces. It does seem to me to be a crime that Canadians in the central provinces, who have waxed rich from the business they have received from the Atlantic provinces, should go to the United States when they have a chance to go to the sea coast for summer holidays instead of going to the coast of the Atlantic provinces. I suggest it is a responsibility of the minister to see that proper facilities are provided so that the people from the central provinces will come to our great Atlantic sea coast. I should like to go on to try to develop this idea a bit further and I am going to refer to my own constituency. In the area of Minas basin and Cobequid bay tremendous water power is produced by the tides of that great basin which rise 60 to 62 feet from low tide to high tide every day. Do you not agree that there is a great undeveloped water power potential in that tremendous tidal reservoir, one that renews itself every day and is inexhaustible? It will go on into eternity, and I am asking the minister to give consideration to the possibilities there.

As I said a moment ago, the survey of 1945 indicated that the development of power from the tidal waters of the bay of Fundy was not economical compared with coal. Again, our coal supply is exhaustible but our tidal power is inexhaustible. I have another thought to put to the minister, and I appreciate that what I am about to say fall* to some extent within the purview of the provincial government. Nevertheless, I come back to a thought I mentioned a few moments ago, namely, that one of our national resources is the tourist business and therefore so far as the tourist business is concerned it

Supply-Northern Affairs would be quite within the province of the federal government to help along the lines I have suggested.

I am coming now to the problem of highways and transportation facilities into our tourist attractions.

Would you gentlemen around me who are talking kindly go outside and carry on your conversation there while I am trying to talk to the minister?

Topic:   PIPE LINES
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OP EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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August 2, 1956

Mr. Purdy:

Thank you. Mr. Minister, I should like to direct your mind to this matter, on a dollar basis, of turning the tides into power, as an economic goal. I am suggesting to you at least two situations in my constituency, one at the estuary of the Shubena-cadie river and the second one on the Avon river. Not only could we turn the tides into power there but at the same time we could do away with the building and the maintenance of railway bridges and highway bridges. In other words, at one fell swoop, if practicable, we could make a triple-purpose utility at the mouths of those great rivers. I have in my files a letter from an engineer who was born in the vicinity of Windsor and who says that he is satisfied-he is now removed to the United States-that power could be developed on the Avon river. He says that 250 thousand horsepower could be developed at the rate of $100 a horsepower. He says that in the United States that is considered to be a low rate. If at that cost we could add the triple purpose of a railway crossing and a highway crossing and duplicate that at the Shubenacadie river, what a great thing we would do in the province of Nova Scotia. That is only a dream, I suppose, but still I suggest and consider that it is something that should be taken into consideration. This idea of the federal government, doing something for highways is not too far afield. If I recall correctly, I read in the paper yesterday that the federal government is going to make a heavy contribution toward a highway out of Ottawa. What has Ottawa got that the maritime provinces have not got? Certainly we have got to have our share in the maritime provinces. I stand up here prepared to fight for that share every time. Let us give the Atlantic as fair a deal as Ottawa is getting now that they are starting to deal with the highway problem.

There is one more thing I want to bring to the minister's attention. I want to say to you, Mr. Minister, that you have been very kind to me. I wonder, Mr. Minister, if you

would let the hon. member for Quebec East sit on his right side of the house for one moment.

Topic:   PIPE LINES
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OP EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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August 2, 1956

Mr. Purdy:

It does not matter where he comes from. I am talking to the goat over here now; that is the one I am talking to.

Mr. Minister, what I was going to say was that you have been very kind to me in connection with some of the requests I have made to you in the past. At other times you have not been quite so fair. A year and a half ago I asked you if you would not consider having the spot where the largest sailing vessel in Canada was built and launched- and I was thinking of the William. D. Lawrence from Maitland-made a historic site. You very kindly arranged through the historic sites and monuments board to have that site commemorated. You have not told me when it is going to happen. Before this debate is through, at the proper time, I hope you will tell me that.

I spoke of the Shubenacadie crossing. That is the point that I wanted to bring to your mind from a tourist standpoint. There is the land where the sailing ships of the days gone by were built before confederation, where the men went out and the tides came in. But today it is a situation which is undeveloped. I believe if you will really sit down and consider the proposal to build this crossing from Black Rock to Maitland, you will come to a favourable conclusion. By the way, it was a service which was maintained before confederation. It was turned over to the federal government at confederation to maintain the wharves and ferry there and to give a subsidy on the ferry. For some reason or other- and I do not blame this on the federal government-it has gone down. But there is a certain responsibility there. If you will just take this matter into consideration and consider that not only could we build a power unit which would develop power but we could provide a crossing by means of a railway bridge and provide a crossing for highway traffic-a triple unit-I believe it would commend itself to you. I believe that your engineers would say it was economic and feasible. That is what my plea is tonight. I ask you just to give us a break and to send your engineers down to look at this place. I know that the

provincial government, if it gets a lead in this matter will co-operate one hundred per cent.

I am going to close in a moment, sir. I think it would be the greatest thing that could happen if this house would only decide to close its discussions and not let the members stay longer in Ottawa. Just let them take one week along the seaboard of the Atlantic provinces and it would do far more good than sitting here for the next week. I know they would come back here prepared to go along with me and that next year, after the minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources considers it as part of his responsibility to help us develop the highways into these great tourist areas, they would come with us and they would be very happy.

Topic:   PIPE LINES
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OP EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Full View Permalink