Michael CLARK

CLARK, Michael, M.B., C.M.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive
Constituency
Red Deer (Alberta)
Birth Date
January 1, 1861
Deceased Date
July 29, 1926
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Clark_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=2ba4bee0-f459-430e-9e36-439d1e383984&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, physician, rancher

Parliamentary Career

October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Red Deer (Alberta)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Red Deer (Alberta)
December 17, 1917 - March 3, 1920
UNI L
  Red Deer (Alberta)
March 3, 1920 - October 4, 1921
PRO
  Red Deer (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 286)


June 4, 1921

Mr. CLARK (Red Deer) :

I should be

very glad of an assurance from my right hon. friend that he will look into the matter?

Topic:   DISTRICT ENGINEER'S OFFICES- EDMONTON
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June 4, 1921

Mr. CLARK (Red Deer):

Will my

right hon. friend give me the assurance that he will look into the matter of discrimination by reason of there being three offices in British Columbia?

Topic:   DISTRICT ENGINEER'S OFFICES- EDMONTON
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June 4, 1921

Mr. MICHAEL CLARK (Red Deer) :

I would like to ask the Government if it is the case that the district engineer's office in the Department of Public Works at Edmonton has been closed, while three similar offices are being kept open in British Columbia. The closing of the Edmonton office would mean that all works of that nature would have to be referred to Winnipeg. If it is the case, does not the Government think that is rather a discrimination against the province of Alberta?

Topic:   DISTRICT ENGINEER'S OFFICES- EDMONTON
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June 3, 1921

Mr. CLARK (Red Deer):

May I be permitted, in a sentence, to fortify the very moderate appeal of the hon. member for Fort William and Rainy River (Mr. Manion) ? It would be a matter of poignant regret to me to see any division in this House based upon religious views, or that might be suspected to be a division based upon such views. As for my personal regret, that is a small matter; but I hold, further, that such a division is to be avoided by every well wisher of. this country if it can be avoided by any reasonable means. I would appeal to my friends, if I may call them so, the mover and the seconder of this amendment, to weigh well what fell from the hon. member for Fort William and Rainy River. Might I add my personal confession to his appeal, that this question has been sprung so suddenly that, sitting at this end of the chamber, I cannot give an intelligent vote on it at this moment? I have the greatest objection to running away from any vote. I think our friends on both sides of the House will do me the credit of saying that, as .a rule, I have the courage of my convictions. There is tremendous force, in the mind of one who has been brought up as a British Liberal, in what has been pointed out by the hon. member for Shelburne and Queen's (Mr. Fielding), that if you begin to give statutory recognition to sects, it is impossible to resist the claim that more than one sect has directed. As a matter of fact,

one of the fights of British Liberalism, as I learned it-and I am not putting this forward as an argument so much as a request for light on this question-was to relieve the State as soon as possible of even the most distant connection with any given church in the State. I should like to put that to my hon. friends, and if we are to vote on this amendment, I should like to have enlightenment upon how, as Liberals, they reconcile themselves with the history of Liberalism, not only in Britain, but in this country. There was a time when the Anglican church was an established institution in Canada, but it was dug up. I should like to have an explanation which would disabuse my mind of what I am sure will be recognized as legitimate fears upon this point.

But I rose merely to reinforce, if I could, in a single word, the very moderate and tolerant appeal that was made in the speech of my hon. friend from Fort William and Rainy River. Why not accept the -assurance of the Prime Minister and give time, if such be thought necessary, to get together the best minds on both sides of this House and discuss this matter calmly and quietly, and let the Government deal with it when they have something like a mature opinion upon the subject? I appeal to my hon. friends to relieve some of their friends and some friends who sympathise with their position, from a difficult position and not to throw an apple of religious dissension into the last hours of this session which may spread to a very great extent in this country. I make that appeal on the grounds of broad Liberalism of thought, and I trust they will give earnest heed to the words which I have ventured to utter.

Amendment (Mr. Trahan) negatived.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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June 3, 1921

Mr. CLARK (Red Deer):

Could not

that be staged on the same day as the Dempsey-Carpentier bout?

Topic:   WORTH).
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