Donald Frank MAZANKOWSKI

MAZANKOWSKI, The Right Hon. Donald Frank, P.C., C.C., A.O.E, LL.D.

Parliamentary Career

June 25, 1968 - September 1, 1972
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Caucus Chair (October 24, 1973 - January 1, 1976)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
  • Progressive Conservative Party Caucus Chair (October 24, 1973 - January 1, 1976)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
  • Minister of Transport (June 4, 1979 - March 2, 1980)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
  • Minister of Transport (June 4, 1979 - March 2, 1980)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
  • Minister of Transport (September 17, 1984 - June 29, 1986)
  • Minister of Regional Industrial Expansion (May 13, 1986 - June 29, 1986)
  • Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (June 30, 1986 - December 30, 1988)
  • Progressive Conservative Party House Leader (June 30, 1986 - December 30, 1988)
  • Deputy Prime Minister (June 30, 1986 - June 24, 1993)
  • President of the Privy Council (June 30, 1986 - April 20, 1991)
  • Vice-President (July 4, 1986 - June 24, 1993)
  • President of the Treasury Board (August 27, 1987 - March 30, 1988)
  • Minister responsible for Privatization and Regulatory Affairs (August 27, 1987 - January 29, 1989)
  • Minister of Agriculture (September 15, 1988 - April 20, 1991)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Vegreville (Alberta)
  • Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (June 30, 1986 - December 30, 1988)
  • Progressive Conservative Party House Leader (June 30, 1986 - December 30, 1988)
  • Deputy Prime Minister (June 30, 1986 - June 24, 1993)
  • President of the Privy Council (June 30, 1986 - April 20, 1991)
  • Vice-President (July 4, 1986 - June 24, 1993)
  • Minister responsible for Privatization and Regulatory Affairs (August 27, 1987 - January 29, 1989)
  • Minister of Agriculture (September 15, 1988 - April 20, 1991)
  • Minister of Finance (April 21, 1991 - June 24, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 1743)


June 16, 1993

Mr. Mazankowski:

I know all members of the House will want to join with me to pay tribute to John's scrupulous impartiality, the soundness of his judgment and his sense of humour which was often biting but never unfair.

John has been consistently sensitive and sympathetic to the cause of linguistic and cultural equality, as reflected in the proceedings of this House.

I will always remember John Fraser as a passionate Canadian, a man who believes in a united, generous and tolerant Canada, who has a zest for life, is a great defender of this institution, enjoys the vigour of debate, and is a man filled with emotion and compassion. These are the principles he believes in and they are the reasons for his unwavering dedication to public life and our way of democracy.

As a Canadian, a fellow parliamentarian and a friend I would simply like to say thanks to the hon. member for Vancouver South. I would like to thank him for setting such a high standard for those who will follow him and thank him for demonstrating to all of us the meaning of the words honour and commitment.

The hon. member for Vancouver South is a true Canadian patriot. This place is richer, better and more effective as a result of his presence and his years of service. Though we all regret that John could not be with us today, we will all join in wishing with him and his

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family that he will soon be able to continue putting his remarkable talents at the service of his fellow citizens.

We wish him and his family, his wife Cate and his three daughters, on behalf of all of the members of the government side all the very best in their future endeavours. I join with my other colleagues in the House of Commons in sending John Fraser our sincere best wishes and congratulations and sincere thanks for a job well done.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   HON. JOHN FRASER
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June 16, 1993

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, I am sorry to prolong the tributes, but as a member of the class of '681 wanted to join with the member for Algoma and my good friend from Papineau-Saint-Michel to pay tribute to the distinguished class of 1968, those who survived and those who went on to do other things.

In looking over the occupations of the 96 members who came to the House of Commons on June 25, 1968 we can see that they covered a wide cross-section of Canadian society. There were railroaders-and I mean real true railroaders-union leaders, mayors, businessmen, farmers, fishermen, lawyers, professors, doctors, stock brokers, administrators, the odd automobile dealer and people from the professions. They really brought quite a broad perspective of views and opinions with them to the House of Commons and obviously brought their views and concerns which reflected the regions from which they came.

There were a number of firsts that were achieved by the class of '68. Three stand out in my mind. Lincoln Alexander, who later went on to become the Lieutenant-Governor of the province of Ontario, was the first black person elected to the Parliament of Canada. That was really quite a thrill, certainly for him and particularly for us because he was a member of our party.

Len Marchand, who is now firmly entrenched in the other place and has been a great member of Parliament, a great public servant and now a tremendous senator, was the first Indian to ever be elected to the House of Commons.

The hon. member for Yorkton-Melville, and I have to say this because he would be too modest to say it in his

remarks, at the time he was elected was the youngest member to have ever entered the House of Commons. I think he had to quit school and come down here to take on the job.

There was a lot of attention with respect to the variety of members who came here in 1968, but there was clearly a lot of focus on these three members.

I had a chance to go through a number of the people who comprised the class of '68. It is really interesting and noteworthy to consider where they are and what they are doing today. I have already mentioned Lincoln Alexander, who went on to become the Lieutenant-Governor. The member for Oshawa, the Hon. Ed Broadbent, went on to become the leader of the New Democratic Party.

We had people like Judd Buchanan, who is pursuing a distinguished business career; Walter Carter from Newfoundland, who is now in the Newfoundland legislature; Louis Comeau, who I believe is the CEO for Nova Scotia Power; Eymard Corbin, who is in the Senate; Bud Cullen, who went on to become a minister and is in the Federal Court today; Pierre de Bane, who went on to become a minister and a member of the Senate; Alastair Gillespie, who went on to become a minister; Phil Givens, who is the former mayor of Toronto and is a very colourful individual who never really got used to this place and went back to Toronto; our good friend Joe Guay, who was a great parliamentarian and a great committee member and went on to become a minister and a member of the Senate; and there was Speaker Jerome, a very distinguished member of the class of '68 who was a very distinguished Speaker of the House and then went on to become and is presently the Associate Chief Justice of the Federal Court.

Otto Lang who was dean of law at the University of Saskatchewan had a very distinguished career here. John Lundrigan was a very colourful member of the class of '68. He went on to become a member of the Newfoundland government. There were people like Mark MacGui-gan and Patrick Mahoney who are now in the Federal Court. I could go on. Keith Penner is now with the National Transportation Agency. Frank Moores went on to become the premier of Newfoundland. Mark Rose.

June 16, 1993

I know my hon. friend across the way gets a little annoyed about reminiscing, but one of these days he will have a chance to reflect on 25 years of service.

What we have here is a pretty good cross-section of what the House of Commons really represents. Yes, there are some who have passed on and we think of them. We think of their families. We remember our friendship and the association we had together in this place.

As others have said in their remarks, I think what we really want to say is that these members contributed greatly to the institution of Parliament. We value the friendship that was made during the course of our association with them.

We all recognize that we believe in the profession of politics. We believe in this institution. This really is the main hall of the preservation of our democracy and our freedom. All of us can be enriched by the valuable contribution the class of '68 rendered to this institution and indeed to the House.

I want to add my congratulations to those who are here, those who have survived and those who have contributed not only to this institution but in their other walks of life in pursuing the goals and objectives of building a better Canada.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   CLASS OF '68
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June 16, 1993

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, today it is my pleasure to rise to pay tribute to one of our most distinguished colleagues, one of the most distinguished members of the House, our friend and colleague, the hon. member for Vancouver South, the Speaker of the Chamber, the Hon. John Fraser.

Most of us know him simply as Mr. Speaker for that is the role that he has played with great humour and skill over the last seven years. Like many of us, I have also been privileged to know him as a colleague, a friend and as a member of the party of which I am a member.

On behalf of the party and on behalf of the Government of Canada I am therefore happy and proud to salute the remarkable contribution that he has made to the institution of Parliament and in advancing Canadian democracy.

June 16, 1993

The Hon. John Fraser has been a member of the House for almost 21 years and sat for almost 11 years as a member of the opposition. As an opposition member he was a principled individual who pursued the important issues that concerned him most and those which were of concern to the people and the region he represented.

Most notable among these issues was the environment which I suppose stems from the fact that he really is a great outdoorsman. He is an avid hunter and fisherman, an ardent skier. One of his daughters is a world champion.

It is important to note that in his campaign of 1972, long before the environment was a popular issue, it was one of the principal elements of his personal electoral platform.

As Minister of the Environment in the government of the right hon. member for Yellowhead he was the first Canadian minister to begin acid rain treaty negotiations with the United States. It was this vision and groundwork which helped our government to conclude an historic acid rain agreement with the United States some years later, an accord which helps to safeguard our national heritage for future generations. The establishment of a national park on South Moresby Island and the Greening the Hill program are just two more examples of the kind of leadership the hon. member for Vancouver South has shown.

I have every reason to believe that even in his retirement from this place he will continue to speak out publicly in favour of sustainable development, environmental protection and its enhancement.

As the first elected Speaker of the House of Commons, the hon. member from Vancouver felt that it was critical to move immediately to gain the trust and support of his fellow parliamentarians. That he did, and he did it with great flourish, commanding the overwhelming respect of all members of the House in landmark decisions that were seen as fair to all sides.

John Fraser reveres the institution of Parliament and has a profound understanding of the role that it plays in the maintenance of our democratic society and the enrichment of our democratic principles. He more than anyone else in the Chamber has helped to maintain the reputation of the House of Commons as a place for

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vigorous but dignified discussions of the nation's business. He was always concerned about the dignity and the decorum of the House.

It is also fair to say, and I am sure that this would be supported by all members of the House, that he was fair-minded and always went the extra distance to give every member the benefit of the doubt, sometimes to the exasperation of members on the government side. However his combined abilities, with his wit, his humour and his keen sense of timing, were very important in the discharge of his difficult task as Speaker of the House.

This is the legacy the Speaker of the House of Commons has left to this institution and all Canadians. As parliamentarians and as Canadians we owe him a tremendous debt of gratitude.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   HON. JOHN FRASER
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June 15, 1993

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, I did not call the Liberal members nervous Nellies. It was her own leader

June 15, 1993

who called the members of the Liberal Party nervous Nellies. He called a few of them cry-babies as well.

As the hon. member knows there is a constitutional requirement to hold an election and an election will be held in 1993.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FEDERAL ELECTION
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June 15, 1993

Hon. Don Mazankowski (Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance):

Madam Speaker, on November 21, 1988 this party, this Prime Minister and this government were given a mandate for five years. We have gone through a leadership change and when that transition takes places and at an appropriate time an election will be called. I just hope hon. members opposite are ready.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT APPOINTMENTS
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