Thomas Joseph KICKHAM

KICKHAM, The Hon. Thomas Joseph

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Kings (Prince Edward Island)
Birth Date
March 11, 1901
Deceased Date
December 1, 1974
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Joseph_Kickham
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=28474b3f-d846-4bce-a9c2-49ed8c0b19e7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, trader

Parliamentary Career

June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Kings (Prince Edward Island)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Kings (Prince Edward Island)
July 8, 1966 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Kings (Prince Edward Island)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 13)


March 27, 1957

At the rates allowed under the new fiscal arrangements effective in the 1957 tax year (i.e. 9 per cent of corporate profits, 10 per cent of federal individual income tax, and 50 per cent of federal succession duties) the amount would be for the year 1951-52: Corporation and corporation income taxes $350,000

Individual income taxes 146,000

Succession duties 15,000

This compares with a payment under the agreement, exclusive of subsidies, of $2,474,286.00.

2. Prince Edward Island received the following payments under the 1947 tax rental agreement, in addition to statutory subsidies which totalled $2,284,660:

For 1947-48 $1,664,958

1948- 49

1,762,6811949- 50

1,983,7761950- 51

2,234,1451951- 52

2,474,286

3. In the 1952 tax rental agreement, as in 1947, there was no direct relationship between the taxes surrendered and the payments made. Prince Edward Island received a basic minimum payment of $2,977,015, including statutory subsidies, which was subject to increase in accordance with changes in population and per capita gross national product from the base year 1948.

An estimate of the return that would have been received by Prince Edward Island in the last year of the present agreement 1956-57 from the taxes surrendered at the rates of credits in effect for 1956 (i.e. a 7 per cent rate on corporate profits in the province plus an allowance of 1J per cent for special corporation taxes, 10 per cent of the federal individual income tax, and 50 per cent of the federal succession duties) is:

Corporation income tax $395,000

Individual income tax 206,000

Succession duties 154,000

At the rates allowed under the new fiscal arrangements effective in the 1957 tax year (i.e., 9 per cent of corporate profits, 10 per cent of federal individual income tax, and 50 per cent of federal succession duties) the amount would be for the year 1956-57: Corporation and corporation income taxes $418,000

Individual income taxes 206,000

Succession duties 154,000

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TAX RENTAL AGREEMENTS, PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
Full View Permalink

March 8, 1957

Mr. Kickham:

I should like to congratulate the Postmaster General and all his officials on the efficient administration which they have given to all postal matters.

I wish to mention an instance in my constituency this winter. Owing to the fact that we had a very severe winter in our province it was difficult to have our mail transported by motor vehicle. We asked the authorities of the Postmaster General's department, who are now in Saint John, New Brunswick, to give us an alternative service, which was asked for by town councils and boards of trade in my constituency. The authorities in Saint John were most co-operative, and are now giving us an alternative service in the transportation of mail by motor vehicle and, when that is not possible, by rail service.

Before taking my seat I wish to ask the minister whether it would not be possible to have the authority over postal matters restored to the city of Charlottetown. I understand that two years ago the authority was transferred to the city of Saint John. Personally I have no complaint whatsoever because, as in the instance which I have just mentioned, the Saint John authorities were most co-operative. But I have many requests that the authority be again restored to the city of Charlottetown.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO TABLING OF FURTHER SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR THE CURRENT FISCAL YEAR
Full View Permalink

February 18, 1957

What amounts were paid to the province of Prince Edward Island in each year since 1945 in (a) subsidies on potatoes; (b) subsidies on feed grain; (c) bonuses on hogs and lambs; (d) subsidies on ground limestone and fertilizer?

Answer by: Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner

(Minister of Agriculture):

(a)

1946-47 . .. $ 17,000

1947-48 . . . 28,000

1949-50 . .. 586,000

1951-52 ... 78,000

1954-55 . . . 2,385,000

1955-56 . . . 6,000

The above payments were made to producers or organizations in Prince Edward Island for the benefit of producers of potatoes and to assist in marketing the Canadian potato crop, including payments for storage warehouses.

(b) Amounts paid in freight assistance on shipments of feed grains into Prince Edward Island:

Fiscal year:

1945-46 $ 405,317

1946-47 457,543

1947-48 422,611

1948-49 398,528

1949-50 363,430

1950-51 374,669

1951-52 349,383

1952-53 398,674

1953-54 328,946

1954-55 261,903

1955-56 417,646

(c)

1946- $ 67,035

1947- 75,040

1948- 111,332

1949- 113,658

1950- 130,686

1951- 129,613

1952- 138,234

1953 102,857

1954- 112,095

1955- 110,332

1956- . 97,289

The above hog premiums paid to Prince

Edward Island producers were calculated from gradings according to origin.

No bonuses were paid on lambs.

(d) Amount of assistance paid to the province of Prince Edward Island on the distribution of agricultural limestone:

Fiscal year:

1945-46 $ 22,577

1946-47 24,077

1947-48 18,654

1948-49 22,485

1949-50 25,192

1950-51 23,174

1951-52 30,532

1952-53 30,431

1953-54 34,127

1954-55 32,985

1955-56 37,563

No information available on a provincial

basis for subsidies on fertilizers, discontinued in 1947.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
Subtopic:   AGRICULTURAL
Full View Permalink

January 22, 1957

Mr. T. J. Kickham (Kings):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to join with hon. members who have preceded me in this debate in extending my congratulations to the mover (Mr. Hanna) and the seconder (Mr. Robichaud) for the [Mr. McBain.}

splendid contributions they have made in opening the debate on the address in reply to the speech from the throne.

I wish first to express my thanks on behalf of the people of my county for the public works program carried on in my county and to thank the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Winters) for the new construction of the Georgetown railway wharf, and the construction of a new frost-proof potato warehouse on the wharf, replacing the now obsolete warehouse this coming season.

A great deal has been accomplished in the dredging of harbours, thus deepening the waterways to give sufficient draft for fishing boats to reach the wharves and also in new construction on breakwaters and wharves. All this work was necessary in order to assist fishermen and farmers in carrying on successfully their respective industries. There still remain numerous requests for similar work to be carried out at many fishing centres, and I am always fervently hoping and asking that those requests will be met through sufficient money appropriations. I realize, however, that we cannot expect to have everything done all at once, as a government can only spend money in keeping with their annual revenue from year to year. I can say to the minister that we are thankful for the recognition and the appreciation he has acknowledged of our need in regard to assisting fishermen and farmers in the prosecution of their daily pursuits.

Our farmers and fishermen suffer greatly because of the continuous freight rate tariff increases, and of course this applies to the four Atlantic provinces particularly because of our geographical location in Canada. Long hauls mean that we are without the truck transport competition enjoyed by the central provinces, with accompanying lower freight tariff rates to remedy this discrimination. I would suggest to the government that if they compensated the railways for the increases in freight tariff rates, amounting to over 100 per cent since 1945, especially on our major products such as coal, potatoes and fish, this action would assist the economy of the Atlantic provinces greatly.

As each of those three are bulky products and as the present freight rates bear heavily on those industries, I would also urge that the feed grain freight assistance as well as the Maritime Freight Rates Act be restored to its former effectiveness before the horizontal increase in freight rates took place. To my mind there is no better measure that the government could decide upon to assist the economy of the Atlantic provinces than to absorb a large portion of freight rate tariffs on our products going to central Canada. This

would give us the most direct and immediate relief and the greatest encouragement, and would be equal to a blood transfusion to our economy. The ever-increasing freight rates are a terrific burden on us and do not allow us to compete on equal terms.

It has been said that any depressed area in Canada reflects itself on the whole economy of Canada. I believe this statement to be true. I believe I have suggested one obvious way of mitigating our economic difficulties, at least to some extent.

Many farmers in our province in need of funds to finance their farm operations find it most difficult to procure a loan through the Canadian farm loan board because of the high level of security required before a loan is approved. The Canadian Farm Loan Act has been in operation for the past 27 years and provides for only 14 per cent of all farm loans in Canada. The losses sustained since its inception have been insignificant. To assist farmers in acquiring loans the security required should be reduced by 25 per cent. If this were done, many applicants who are now ineligible could become qualified and could take advantage of the interest rates and amortization provisions for which the act provides. A decrease in the amount of security required, in line with my suggestion, would permit greater latitude to be exercised by the district supervisors and would give the act more flexibility. At present it is far too restrictive in character. It would seem that the length of time which elapses from the date of application until appraisals are made on the farm properties is entirely too long. Apparently some district offices are understaffed and, through no fault of the district supervisor, the applicant becomes frustrated because of the extremely long waiting period.

This Canadian farm loan board could be made the best loan agency in Canada, but it must cast off much of its security requirements. I trust that the Minister of Finance (Mr. Harris) will broaden out this legislation and make its lending facilities reach out to supply the borrowing needs of many more farmers than it does at the present time.

I should like to say a word on veterans pensions. Many veterans who served in the first world war but who did not go beyond England are not eligible for the war veterans allowance. The same thing applies in the second world war in respect of veterans who did not serve outside of Canada and Newfoundland. Some of those veterans voluntarily would have gone overseas but, because of special qualifications, they were retained in Canada. They are now denied war veterans allowance by our legislation.

82715-33i

The Address-Mr. J. A. Smith

My suggestion to the Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Lapointe) is to grant to all veterans reaching the age of 60 years $40 per month, in the same way as all citizens reaching the age of 70 automatically receive $40 per month. Forty dollars per month should be of great assistance to many veterans who find themselves in distressing financial circumstances.

Our fishing industry is most important in my province. The provincial and federal departments concerned are co-operating in splendid work in research and applying scientific methods to the catching of fish and also to the manner of processing the fish.

I should like to see the cold storage and refrigeration legislation broadened so that packers and processors would become eligible to receive subsidies for the construction of refrigeration plants. Refrigeration is now an absolute necessity and if the packers and processors were given assistance they would be able to provide this necessity. Often they are unable to provide refrigeration out of their own resources, and any assistance granted is of benefit to each individual fisherman.

Before concluding my remarks I wish to thank the Minister of Fisheries (Mr. Sinclair) and his parliamentary assistant (Mr. Mac-Naught) for the splendid work they did at my request in allowing quahaugs to be removed from polluted waters in Queen's county, transferred to the beaches of King's county for cleansing purposes and reclaimed for processing in King's county. I am not going into detail about the difficulties the minister met, but I do know there were many barriers to hurdle because of health regulations both in Canada and the United States. In this respect we had the fullest co-operation from the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Martin). I shall defer any further remarks on fisheries until the minister's estimates are before the committee.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink

January 22, 1957

Mr. T. J. Kickham (Kings):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to join with hon. members who have preceded me in this debate in extending my congratulations to the mover (Mr. Hanna) and the seconder (Mr. Robichaud) for the [Mr. McBain.}

splendid contributions they have made in opening the debate on the address in reply to the speech from the throne.

I wish first to express my thanks on behalf of the people of my county for the public works program carried on in my county and to thank the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Winters) for the new construction of the Georgetown railway wharf, and the construction of a new frost-proof potato warehouse on the wharf, replacing the now obsolete warehouse this coming season.

A great deal has been accomplished in the dredging of harbours, thus deepening the waterways to give sufficient draft for fishing boats to reach the wharves and also in new construction on breakwaters and wharves. All this work was necessary in order to assist fishermen and farmers in carrying on successfully their respective industries. There still remain numerous requests for similar work to be carried out at many fishing centres, and I am always fervently hoping and asking that those requests will be met through sufficient money appropriations. I realize, however, that we cannot expect to have everything done all at once, as a government can only spend money in keeping with their annual revenue from year to year. I can say to the minister that we are thankful for the recognition and the appreciation he has acknowledged of our need in regard to assisting fishermen and farmers in the prosecution of their daily pursuits.

Our farmers and fishermen suffer greatly because of the continuous freight rate tariff increases, and of course this applies to the four Atlantic provinces particularly because of our geographical location in Canada. Long hauls mean that we are without the truck transport competition enjoyed by the central provinces, with accompanying lower freight tariff rates to remedy this discrimination. I would suggest to the government that if they compensated the railways for the increases in freight tariff rates, amounting to over 100 per cent since 1945, especially on our major products such as coal, potatoes and fish, this action would assist the economy of the Atlantic provinces greatly.

As each of those three are bulky products and as the present freight rates bear heavily on those industries, I would also urge that the feed grain freight assistance as well as the Maritime Freight Rates Act be restored to its former effectiveness before the horizontal increase in freight rates took place. To my mind there is no better measure that the government could decide upon to assist the economy of the Atlantic provinces than to absorb a large portion of freight rate tariffs on our products going to central Canada. This

would give us the most direct and immediate relief and the greatest encouragement, and would be equal to a blood transfusion to our economy. The ever-increasing freight rates are a terrific burden on us and do not allow us to compete on equal terms.

It has been said that any depressed area in Canada reflects itself on the whole economy of Canada. I believe this statement to be true. I believe I have suggested one obvious way of mitigating our economic difficulties, at least to some extent.

Many farmers in our province in need of funds to finance their farm operations find it most difficult to procure a loan through the Canadian farm loan board because of the high level of security required before a loan is approved. The Canadian Farm Loan Act has been in operation for the past 27 years and provides for only 14 per cent of all farm loans in Canada. The losses sustained since its inception have been insignificant. To assist farmers in acquiring loans the security required should be reduced by 25 per cent. If this were done, many applicants who are now ineligible could become qualified and could take advantage of the interest rates and amortization provisions for which the act provides. A decrease in the amount of security required, in line with my suggestion, would permit greater latitude to be exercised by the district supervisors and would give the act more flexibility. At present it is far too restrictive in character. It would seem that the length of time which elapses from the date of application until appraisals are made on the farm properties is entirely too long. Apparently some district offices are understaffed and, through no fault of the district supervisor, the applicant becomes frustrated because of the extremely long waiting period.

This Canadian farm loan board could be made the best loan agency in Canada, but it must cast off much of its security requirements. I trust that the Minister of Finance (Mr. Harris) will broaden out this legislation and make its lending facilities reach out to supply the borrowing needs of many more farmers than it does at the present time.

I should like to say a word on veterans pensions. Many veterans who served in the first world war but who did not go beyond England are not eligible for the war veterans allowance. The same thing applies in the second world war in respect of veterans who did not serve outside of Canada and Newfoundland. Some of those veterans voluntarily would have gone overseas but, because of special qualifications, they were retained in Canada. They are now denied war veterans allowance by our legislation.

82715-33i

The Address-Mr. J. A. Smith

My suggestion to the Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Lapointe) is to grant to all veterans reaching the age of 60 years $40 per month, in the same way as all citizens reaching the age of 70 automatically receive $40 per month. Forty dollars per month should be of great assistance to many veterans who find themselves in distressing financial circumstances.

Our fishing industry is most important in my province. The provincial and federal departments concerned are co-operating in splendid work in research and applying scientific methods to the catching of fish and also to the manner of processing the fish.

I should like to see the cold storage and refrigeration legislation broadened so that packers and processors would become eligible to receive subsidies for the construction of refrigeration plants. Refrigeration is now an absolute necessity and if the packers and processors were given assistance they would be able to provide this necessity. Often they are unable to provide refrigeration out of their own resources, and any assistance granted is of benefit to each individual fisherman.

Before concluding my remarks I wish to thank the Minister of Fisheries (Mr. Sinclair) and his parliamentary assistant (Mr. Mac-Naught) for the splendid work they did at my request in allowing quahaugs to be removed from polluted waters in Queen's county, transferred to the beaches of King's county for cleansing purposes and reclaimed for processing in King's county. I am not going into detail about the difficulties the minister met, but I do know there were many barriers to hurdle because of health regulations both in Canada and the United States. In this respect we had the fullest co-operation from the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Martin). I shall defer any further remarks on fisheries until the minister's estimates are before the committee.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Full View Permalink