Paul Edgar Philippe MARTIN

MARTIN, The Right Hon. Paul Edgar Philippe, P.C., C.C., Hon. B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
Birth Date
August 28, 1938
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Martin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=26693a66-0030-4b80-bea6-f9b33e39e158&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
LIB
  LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
  • Minister of Finance (November 4, 1993 - June 1, 2002)
  • Minister responsible for the Federal Office of Regional Development - Quebec (November 4, 1993 - January 24, 1996)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
  • Minister of Finance (November 4, 1993 - June 1, 2002)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
  • Minister of Finance (November 4, 1993 - June 1, 2002)
  • Prime Minister (December 12, 2003 - February 5, 2006)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
  • Prime Minister (December 12, 2003 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  LaSalle--Émard (Quebec)
  • Prime Minister (December 12, 2003 - February 5, 2006)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 844)


March 20, 2007

Right Hon. Paul Martin (LaSalle—Émard, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, first I would like to thank the members who have spoken in favour of the Kelowna accord tonight and previously. I would like to thank the members who voted for it.

I would also like to thank the aboriginal leaders, from coast to coast, who spoke publicly in favour of a fundamental improvement in the situation of their fellow citizens.

The Kelowna accord is not simply important because a group of people, the federal government, the prime minister, ministers, provincial and territorial premiers and leaders, and the leaders of Canada's aboriginal people, the Métis nation, the first nations, the Inuit, came together at Kelowna. It is important because at that historic moment the nation came together and said that the lack of decent water, the lack of decent housing and the lack of economic opportunity is not acceptable.

We have heard members of the opposition parties speak here tonight. I would ask members of the government if they think it is acceptable that one million Canadians, the youngest and the fastest growing segment of our population, should at the same time have the highest incidence of infant mortality, the lowest life expectancy, that they should have the highest incidence of AIDS, tuberculosis and diabetes.

Do they think the dropout rate among aboriginals in our country should be double—and almost triple— that of other Canadians?

Kelowna is about saying to the youngest segment of our population that they have the right to the same educational opportunities as other Canadians. It says that in a world in which we must compete with other countries which are showing great productivity and great growth, we believe that every single Canadian counts.

Kelowna is also about the way in which it was arrived at. Members of the current government witnessed it on television with their own eyes. All of the political leaders in this country came together to say that we will no longer impose upon the aboriginal communities of this country our way of looking at things, that we will work with them.

Kelowna is important for its objectives, but it is also important for the way in which it was arrived at, the 16 to 18 months of fundamental discussions in community after community, in province after province, in territory after territory, as to how in fact this great partnership between us as Canadians should work. That is what Kelowna is all about.

For members of the government to stand here and say that that never happened is a denial of a fundamental reality and a historic coming together.

I am very proud of the Kelowna accord and I am very proud of the members of Parliament who have supported it.

Topic:   Private Members' Business
Subtopic:   Kelowna Accord Implementation Act
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March 20, 2007

Right Hon. Paul Martin (LaSalle—Émard, Lib.)

moved that Bill C-292, An Act to implement the Kelowna Accord, be read the third time and passed.

Topic:   Private Members' Business
Subtopic:   Kelowna Accord Implementation Act
Full View Permalink

February 16, 2007

Right Hon. Paul Martin (LaSalle—Émard, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, 60 years ago, Prime Minister Mackenzie King declared for the first time, “I speak as a citizen of Canada”, to the participants in Canada's first citizenship ceremony.

The spark that led to the creation of the Canadian Citizenship Act was created in 1945 when a young member of Parliament visited the Canadian War Cemetery in Dieppe and noted that the names on the crosses were French, they were English and they were also from the farthest approaches of the world. He noted that these young men and women could no longer be called only British subjects, that the Canadian Citizenship Act had to be brought into being.

That MP, the minister who later created the act, was my father.

Canada is known to the world as a beacon of hope, respect and decency. As generations of Canadians have built our country, Canadian citizenship has become the mortar of our nation and the emblem of our achievement.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Citizenship Act
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February 15, 2007

Right Hon. Paul Martin (LaSalle—Émard, Lib.)

moved that the bill be concurred in.

Topic:   Private Members' Business
Subtopic:   Kelowna Accord Implementation Act
Full View Permalink

October 16, 2006

Right Hon. Paul Martin (LaSalle—Émard, Lib.)

Why Kelowna, Mr. Speaker? Because, compared to other Canadians, the aboriginal people of Canada earn nearly 40% less and they have a life expectancy 10 years shorter. They are twice as likely to live in poverty and three times less likely to graduate from university.

Why Kelowna? Because Canada has the means to achieve its goals and the moral responsibility to do so.

Those who were in that room that day in Kelowna included the aboriginal leadership in this country and representatives of all of the political parties in this room and across the country. No one in that room had any doubt as to the significance of the agreement that we came to and the significance of what had been done. Every single person who was in that room, every single person who for close to 18 months through a series of round tables and detailed negotiation put everything they had into it and came to that agreement on that historic day, it demeans them for the government to say that this was not worth the paper it was written on, to say that it had no content.

The Kelowna accord was reached by the aboriginal leadership of our country, by every single one of the provinces and territories without exception, and by the federal government. It set out funding for five years of $5.1 billion, funding that was provided for by the then minister of finance. The Kelowna accord consisted of longer term objectives to be achieved and then measured over a series of shorter term markers to be developed by all of the parties.

That is important because what was incorporated in the Kelowna accord was working with the aboriginal leadership and provinces, all governments coming together. This was not an imposition. This was indeed a significant agreement as Canadians from coast to coast to coast said that no longer were they going to allow to continue the unacceptable conditions in which aboriginals live.

The government has said that it agrees with the principles of the Kelowna accord. I ask it to act on those principles.

Topic:   Private Members' Business
Subtopic:   Kelowna Accord Implementation Act
Full View Permalink