Dave NICKERSON

NICKERSON, Dave, B.Sc., P.Eng.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Western Arctic (Northwest Territories)
Birth Date
April 30, 1944
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Nickerson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=251c8921-f8f2-47ca-86da-2fa40e7df4d6&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
mining engineer

Parliamentary Career

May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Western Arctic (Northwest Territories)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Western Arctic (Northwest Territories)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Western Arctic (Northwest Territories)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 285)


September 30, 1988

Mr. Nickerson:

In the final analysis, if I accept a credit card and use it, that is a freely entered into contract between myself and some other person. If at all possible the state should not intervene in those contracts that are made on a voluntary basis.

Another reason is that where Governments in the past have imposed maximum interest rates it has resulted in noneconomic allocation of resources and, in the long run, brought about things that were undesirable. An example that immediately jumps to mind is the question of the Savings and Loans in the United States that are going through a difficult period and causing a lot of problems.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS-BILLS CREDIT CARD INTEREST RATE ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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September 30, 1988

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the Hon. Member for Scarborough West (Mr. Stackhouse) for bringing forward Bill C-266. The subject matter certainly requires debate. It also requires the attention of the public and this House to be focused on a most important matter. During the course of the entire thirty-third Parliament this subject has been kept before us by the Hon. Member for Scarborough West. During that time he has struck the fear of God into the hearts of credit card users throughout Canada.

Most of us have a credit card because they are so useful and convenient. Most of us have at least one in our pockets, especially those people who, like ourselves, travel around quite a bit and do not want to carry a lot of cash. They are extremely convenient and one of the things of the modern age with which we are familiar. Apart from being an advantage to the user of the card, they can also be extremely profitable to the issuer thereof. Certain examples of exactly how profitable have been given this afternoon. For example, some retail stores make more money out of the credit card side of the business than out of actual sales. Credit card issuers make money in a variety of ways. Merchants who take those cards are obliged to pay 2 per cent, 5 per cent, and I have even heard as much as 10 per cent as a commission given by the merchant to the issuer of the credit card. In that case, it would not be an inhouse credit card. There are also various user fees attached, whether it be a start-up fee, or 15 cents per item that is charged. The big money maker is the interest rates charged which range all the way from the high to the extortionate.

I have one complaint against credit card companies when it comes to the calculation of the interest payable. I am one of those people who like to make a little profit out of the credit card companies, if I can. I like to pay all my bills on time within a few days of the end of the period. That way perhaps I can have some free money for a couple of weeks. Occasionally, if I have been travelling around and do not manage to make that payment on the due date, then interest is charged not from the due date until the time that the bill is paid, but going back to the date of the initial purchase. I guess it serves me right because sometimes I make money out of the credit card company, but it does not seem entirely fair.

September 30, 1988

Occasionally there are pretty high pressure sales tactics used, particularly by in-house issuers or certain retail stores. Some pretty high powered tactics are used to get people to accept their credit cards and use them. Often those retail stores have the highest rates of interest attached to the use of their cards. This afternoon we have heard examples of rates as high as 28.8 per cent.

I would like to say a few words about the Bill presented to us in response to this real problem. We have a proposed legislative solution. We are going to legislate ceilings that credit card companies can charge. It will be done on a sliding scale which gets away from some of the difficulties that happen when a maximum interest rate is imposed, and for that reason it is good. If a legislated solution of this nature can be avoided, I think that that would be the preferable way to go.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   PRIVATE MEMBERS' BUSINESS-BILLS CREDIT CARD INTEREST RATE ACT MEASURE TO ENACT
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September 30, 1988

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, the William Pinch Mineral Collection is one of the world's finest and largest. With over 16,000 specimens, many of spectacular quality, it has great potential for both display and research purposes.

It is good news that this collection is being acquired by the National Museum of Natural Sciences for incorporation into the National Mineral Collection of Canada.

It will cost some $7 million to acquire the collection and provide suitable public display facilities but this will not be borne by the taxpayers at large. The money is being raised by

private donations. About three million dollars has already been pledged by some 64 corporations and a number of individuals.

Further donations to this worth-while public purpose would be welcomed by the trustees.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL SCIENCES
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September 29, 1988

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

Mr. Speaker, the announcement that this year's Nobel Peace Prize has been awarded to the United Nations for its peacekeeping efforts makes this day a special one for Canada and the Canadian Armed Forces. Our contribution to international peacekeeping is well known.

While former Prime Minister Pearson raised the profile of this important aspect of the UN's work when he accepted the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize, Canadian participation dates back as far as 1947. We have contributed to 23 different United Nations and non-UN multinational peacekeeping and truce supervisory missions in the last four decades. No other nation has such an enviable record.

Over 80,000 Canadian Forces personnel have participated in international peacekeeping efforts over the years, from Korea to Kashmir, from the Congo to Cypress, and from Lebanon to Viet Nam.

Canadian soldiers have given their lives in distant lands while wearing the blue beret of the United Nations. These dedicated people have worn that beret with pride, knowing that they were contributing to world peace and international security.

I join with other Canadians in saluting the peacekeeping forces serving abroad and in congratulating them on a job well done.

September 29, 1988

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   NOBEL PEACE PRIZE
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September 28, 1988

Mr. Dave Nickerson (Western Arctic):

My question is addressed to whomever is answering for the Minister of Transport.

Last week, a Canadian Airlines International Boeing 737 left Yellowknife on a routine flight to Cambridge Bay, but somehow ended up at Churchill, Manitoba, 1,000 miles and 90 degrees off course. In the process it violated the airspace of many major routes.

I would like to know how did this happen, and what will happen in future to prevent a recurrence of this dangerous type of incident.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   AIR SAFETY
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