Joseph-Hermas LECLERC

LECLERC, Joseph-Hermas

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Shefford (Quebec)
Birth Date
July 12, 1877
Deceased Date
October 4, 1945
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph-Hermas_Leclerc
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=22a65ead-44fc-4cb6-be1d-ef4d5705096b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
industrialist

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Shefford (Quebec)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Shefford (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 7 of 13)


June 2, 1942

Mr. LECLERC:

I was interested this

afternoon to hear the Minister of Agriculture talking about butter and cheese. I have been in that business for about forty years and, although I am not an expert, I believe I know something about the industry. It would seem that the minister and his advisers are a little worried that we may run short of butter this year. The fiscal year, if I may so describe it, for cheese and butter, is from the first of May to the last of April in the following year. Last year we received 85,000 boxes of butter as compared with 50,000 boxes received this year. On the other hand, we received this year 150,000 boxes of cheese as compared with 50,000 boxes last year. There is no necessity for an expert to see at once that we are going to run short of butter before the year is over. Unless we can import some butter I would urge the minister to give serious consideration to the situation and not to wait until the first of October before he revises 'his plans. I know that after the first of October very little milk is produced, and unless a very high price is paid for butter, he wiU not get it at all.

I do not make this suggestion to embarrass the minister, because I always pity ministers when they are being grilled with respect to their estimates-although I know that the passage of estimates is almost a holiday for the present Minister of Agriculture. I do not believe any more milk will be produced this year than last because there is a scarcity of labour. Farmers' sons have been enlisting, and others have been drafted. Many farmers are reducing their herds. They cannot hire help; that is out of the question. The result is that for many reasons we shall be short of butter, because at this time there is a better market for whole milk, condensed milk and cheese. Consequently, if the production of milk is the same as it was last year we cannot expect any increased production. Last fall we had about 8,000,000 pounds of butter that we did not know what to do with, but the purchasing power of our people increased to such an extent that that butter disappeared diuring the winter and was practically all gone on May 1. This year we should have a greater production because we have the market for it.

I do not know that the minister can do much about this matter because we have the wartime prices and trade board. I wonder if that board knows anything about cattle. I wonder if it knows which end of a cow should be milked. I think the government whenever possible should take the advice of those who know something about this business. The other night the hon. member for Renfrew South (Mr. McCann) complained about not being appointed to committees where his advice on medical matters might be of value. I urge the minister to consider these suggestions carefully. I know he is a good listener. About a week ago I wrote him to urge that the butter fat content of ice cream be cut down in order to conserve butter fat. Before I received an answer an order in council was passed reducing the butter fat content to where I wanted it. I compliment the minister upon that action.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
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June 1, 1942

1. Has the government any interests in the International Flare & Signal Company, and MacDonald Chemicals Limited, of Warden, Quebec ?

2. Is the government familiar with the scale of wages and salaries paid by these war industries?

3. Will a scale of wages and salaries be paid there equal to that paid in other war industries in the province of Quebec?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARDEN, QUE., WAR INDUSTRIES
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May 21, 1942

Mr. J. H. LECLERC (Shefford):

Mr. Speaker, I hold in my hand a copy of the Temperance Advocate, which states that the liquor bill for Ontario this year will be $88,000,000 as compared with $73,000,000 last year. It is not my intention to scold the people of Ontario for this rather high consumption of liquor, but I should like to ask the government how it is that the distributors of hard liquor and the brewers of beer seem able to get all the bottles they need when the milk distributors have to beg the glass controller to give them the bottles they need.

Topic:   GLASS CONTAINERS
Subtopic:   AVAILABILITY TO BEER AND SPIRITS MANUFACTURERS AND MILK DISTRIBUTORS
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May 4, 1942

1. Is the government aware that an explosion occurred recently at the works of the International Flare and Signal Company at Waterloo, Quebec, causing seven or eight deaths?

2. Has the government awarded any war contracts to this company?

3. If so, (a) what is the minimum salary or wages paid; (b) are employees injured in accidents occurring in -war industries entitled to workmen's compensation?

Topic:   MUNITIONS AND SUPPLY-TRANSFER OF OFFICES FROM OTTAWA
Subtopic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS-EXPLOSION AT WATERLOO, QUE., CHEMICAL PLANT
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April 28, 1942

Mr. J. H. LECLERC (Shefford):

May I ask the Minister of Labour (Mr. Mitchell) whether he is aware of a disastrous explosion that took place at the International Flare and Signal Company, Waterloo, Quebec, of which seven or eight persons were victims? Has the government any contracts with this company? Is there a scale of salaries for employees of these munitions plants, and if so what is it?

Topic:   INQUIRY OF THE MINISTRY
Subtopic:   EXPLOSION AT PLANT OP INTERNATIONAL FLARE AND SIGNAL COMPANY
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