Joseph RUSSELL

RUSSELL, Joseph

Personal Data

Party
Independent
Constituency
Toronto East (Ontario)
Birth Date
April 1, 1868
Deceased Date
December 14, 1925
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Russell_(Canadian_politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1f3bef0e-cafb-4f1f-af7c-c5e8ddc5b512&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
industrialist

Parliamentary Career

October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
IND
  Toronto East (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 16)


July 24, 1911

Mr. JOSEPH RUSSELL (East Toronto).

Mr. Speaker, I desire to-refer briefly to an event of very great national interest of which the cable has brought the news since our last meeting. I refer to the splendid achievement of a fellow-citizen of Toronto, Private W. J. Clifford, in winning the King's prize at the meeting of the National Rifle Association at Bisley. This, I need hardly mention, is the crowning honour of the great competition in marksmanship participated in annually by upwards of three thousand of the riflemen of the Empire, all the overseas dominions being well represented, tvhile the flower of the regular and volunteer forces of the mother country enter into the keenest competition for the honours of the meeting.

Private Clifford is of the Tenth Royal Grenadiers, a regiment that since rifle shooting has been in vogue as the pastime of the volunteers of Canada has been second to none in the distinctions it has achieved as a training school for marksmen. It is especially fitting, therefore, that the honour achieved by Private Clifford shall be shared by a regiment so generally recognized as worthy to bear it. It is the young rifleman's second visit to Bisley, but for several years Private Clifford has been conspicuous at the great Canadian meeting at Roekliffe, in 1909 for instance, winning one of the three prizes so generously offered by His Excellency, the Governor-General for competition here.

Besides winning the King's Prize, Private Clifford has won also, at Bisley this year, the Prince of Wales' prize for a competition entirely distinct, an achievement never before accomplished during the fifty years of the National Rifle Association competitions. Examination of the records shows that the same has figured only twice before since the very beginning, as the winner of these two prizes donated by royalty, but in each case the honour was achieved in separate years for each prize. Thus Sergt. Lawrence of the 1st Dumbarton won the Queen's Prize in 1882, and the Prince of Wales' Prize the following year; while Major Pollock won the Queen's in 1892 and the Prince of Wales' in 1896. It has remained for Private Clifford to set a new record for the new reign, and so to identify himself for all time with the generosity of His Majesty King George and Edward, Prince of Wales.

This is the third occasion, it is fitting for me to mention, that Canadian competitors at Bisley have brought distinction to their country as well as to themselves by winning the Queen's or the King's Prize. Hayhurst, already well-known as an Old Country rifle-

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man, led the way in 1895, shortly after he had come to Canada and joined the Thirteenth Regiment of Hamilton. Then Private

S. J. Perry, a young Canadian of Vancouver, was the King's Prize winner in 1904; and Private Clifford is our third Gold Medallist.

Rifle shooting means much more to us as a nation than does any other sport. It is generally recognized as the mainspring of the interest in the training of many regiments, and it is the sole bond of communication between our volunteers in the several cities and provinces of Canada and between Canadians and their comrades in arms from over the seas. In addition rifle shooting is recognized as involving the best development of physical manhood and of character. No one but a good citizen, an exemplary man, can be successful as a marksman. The honour won by Private Clifford il specially worthy of recognition, and I therefore extend to him my congratulations and those of his friends in this country.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-WINNER OF THE KING'S PRIZE AT BISLEY.
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May 18, 1911

Mr. BUSSELL.

I would like to ask the

minister a question. Under present conditions and regulations, is the department getting satisfactory men in the railway mail service? Have they any difficulty in maintaining the service with satisfactory men?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE ACT AMENDMENT.
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May 18, 1911

Mr. RUSSELL.

The other night when we discussed the resolution, the minister gave us to understand that the men in the service were perfectly satisfied with the increases. But since the wording of the Bill has been made known, I have received several letters and telegrams from men in the service, indicating that tthey are anything but satisfied. Here is one telegram which I received:

Bill much less favourable than appears. Clerks greatly disappointed.

I had another letter from a clerk who pointed out to me that in a good many cases a large percentage were receiving practically no benefit from the increase. There is no doubt that the object of these resolutions was to increase the salaries of different clerks in the post office and railway mail service; but in the way these increases are proposed, in some cases the clerks have to work five or six years before they begin to derive any benefit. Take a clerk who is now at $900, he will (have to work ten years before he gets to the top of this increase or six years until he gets to the present maximum of $1,200. Then he begins to derive some benefit from what we are given to believe is an increase at present. It is not much of an increase the clerks are getting now. They are al-

ready getting {50 inciease in their salary per year, and have to go on working six years before they participate in the increases given under the new Bill. After thinking this matter over, perhaps the Postmaster General will consider favourably some of these things, and make the increase from {800 instead of from {1,000. That would be some sort of an important increase. It would be something in the way of an immediate increase to the men. There is no doubt that they have the same reason to expect an increase that the men of the inside service hhve. I do not see why there should not be an increase to the outside service as well as to the inside service who happen to be under the Civil Service Act. All are public servants of the Dominion, anti all give good Teturns for the salaries they receive. We should do justice to all public servants. But I suppose I need not deal at greater length with this question. The Postmaster General understands what we need. We desire some real benefit to the employees, and I think that what I have asked is not in any way unreasonable.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE ACT AMENDMENT.
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May 18, 1911

Mr. BUSSELL.

Is there any way in which you make the position attractive enough to get men who could qualify? When you get men who are able to qualify at the start, would you necessarily send for them from among the labourers you take in and train?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE ACT AMENDMENT.
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May 12, 1911

Mr. RUSSELL.

I want to make a plea for the railway mail clerk who, under the

new schedule, enters the service at $500 whereas the postman enters at $600 or a little better, and gets his clothes and boots. I think it would be only fair to raise the minimum of the railway mail clerk to $600, so as not to ask them to start at a lower salary than the postmen. I think they are entitled to $600 a year to start with.

Topic:   S927 COMMONS
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