Albert Edward MUNN

MUNN, Albert Edward

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Vancouver North (British Columbia)
Birth Date
January 30, 1865
Deceased Date
February 22, 1946
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albert_Edward_Munn
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1c09c70d-a251-423e-abff-9a7d7ccce558&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lumber merchant, manager

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Vancouver North (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 42)


May 27, 1935

Mr. MUNN:

It puts the parks board in a wrong light. It is not worth $4 a cord; you could not get more than half that. I have been in the woods all my life and in Stanley park, over every foot of it. A good many people think that it is virgin timber, but Stanley park was logged a good many years ago and the big trees are all gone. There are very few old timers. The commercial value of the timber there is not more than $20,000 to-day. It is only 600 acres. It is not fair to the parks board to say that they are salvaging $40,000 worth of timber. They might sell $40,000 worth of timber if they could cut it all off, but it would cost a good deal .of money.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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May 27, 1935

Mr. MUNN:

Coming back to Stanley park, and the question asked by the hon. member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Mackenzie), did I understand the minister to say that they had salvaged $40,000 worth of material in clearing up the park?

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
Full View Permalink

May 27, 1935

Mr. MUNN:

With regard to the $40,000 for salvage, walking out of the chamber I heard one hon. member from the opposite side remark, "That is good; $65,000 for Stanley park in one day. Twenty-five thousand would have been all right." I may tell the minister that the commercial value of all the timber in Stanley park would not be more than half $40,000 to-day. Will the minister give the name of the forest engineer or of the person who placed that estimate of $40,000 on the salvage ?

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
Full View Permalink

May 23, 1935

Mr. MUNN:

I should like to support the hon. member for Vancouver South (Mr. Mac-Innis) in his appeal to the minister for some recognition in regard to Stanley park, Vancouver. The minister mentioned that it was in the hands of that city. Well, it is under lease, but it belongs to the dominion government and I have appealed in the house before for some survey by the government as to what is happening in Stanley park. That park is one of the beauty spots on the Pacific coast. The city is in a bad way; the civic authorities have not the money to spend, and as the hon. member says, money spent on that park would be ordinary investment. Not only would work done in cleaning up the park give employment to men, but the park will certainly never amount to anything unless it is cleaned up because there is so much in the way of dead timber and fallen trees. The dead timber and fallen trees should all be cleaned out; they are breeding grounds for beetles that will destroy timber that might otherwise grow in a healthy state.

I am sorry the Minister of the Interior (Mr. Murphy) is not in his seat; I have appealed several times to the hon. gentleman, and perhaps the Minister of Public Works will pass my suggestion on to him. On the river Squamish in British Columbia there are at intervals very bad floods and some river bank protection work should be done there. There are two or three Indian reserves along that river; there is a town of five or six hundred people. The government should cooperate in this work through the Superintendent General of Indian Affairs with the

provincial government and perhaps the Pacific Great Eastern Railway. There is a danger that some day there will be a flood there that will carry that town into the ocean. The situation is a serious one. I have had a good deal of correspondence with the minister but I cannot get any satisfaction; they say they are investigating, but they never get anywhere.

I have another suggestion to make. In this item there is mention of the Big Bend highway. It will be realized that at the present time we have a very serious situation in British Columbia in connection with the relief camps. I am familiar with the situation there; I have visited the camps and I know the class of men that are in them. There are some that we would be better off without, as the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Stirling) knows, but there are others whom we would like to see taken care of. The present system is absolutely unworkable. I suggest that the federal government might use some of the money in this vote-it might perhaps be supplemented later on-in cooperation with the provincial government to put the men on the Big Bend highway and give them a five hour day on the road at forty cents an hour. That would mean $2 a day. If they get a better job, let them take it; but in the meantime those who will work will be quite satisfied and those who will not work-well, let them either work or go hungry. The government would find that that would satisfy the men and it would be doing a work that we are all anxious to see completed, namely, the trans^Canada highway. Of course the minister may say that that is a matter for the province; granted, but a little bit of cooperation would bring about the desired result. The trouble could have been settled in one day had some such suggestion as that been followed; when the mayor of Vancouver wired the acting Prime Minister (Sir George Perley), had the latter wired back: "All right, I will put the men on the highway," or made some announcement to that effect, everj'body would have been satisfied and the men would have gone back to the camps. Let the government put them on the road, and let them buy and pay for their board. That short day, at $2 a day, would not interfere with the regular logging, lumbering and mining industries.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAIDWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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April 17, 1935

Mr. MUNN:

May I support the observations of the hon. member for North Renfrew. I a.m familiar with the Algonquin park territory, and I realize how great a mistake it would be if the Canadian National Railways were to take up the rails on the section of the road about which the hon. member has spoken. A great deal of the tourist traffic could be directed towards the park. I shall not take up further time but inasmuch as I know that section of the country I feel it would be a great mistake to take up the rails.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OF RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
Full View Permalink