Thomas Edward SIDDON

SIDDON, The Hon. Thomas Edward, P.C., B.Sc., M.A.Sc., Ph.D., P.Eng., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Richmond (British Columbia)
Birth Date
November 9, 1941
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Siddon
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1babc9d3-8d8a-489e-99f2-d360a5ab621b&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, lecturer, professional engineer, professor of engineering

Parliamentary Career

October 16, 1978 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Burnaby--Richmond--Delta (British Columbia)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Richmond--South Delta (British Columbia)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (October 1, 1979 - December 14, 1979)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Richmond--South Delta (British Columbia)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Richmond--South Delta (British Columbia)
  • Minister of State for Science and Technology (September 17, 1984 - November 19, 1985)
  • Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (November 20, 1985 - February 22, 1990)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Richmond (British Columbia)
  • Minister of Fisheries and Oceans (November 20, 1985 - February 22, 1990)
  • Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development (February 23, 1990 - June 24, 1993)
  • Minister of National Defence (June 25, 1993 - November 3, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 400)


March 12, 1993

Hon. Thomas Siddon (for the Minister of Finance) moved

for leave to introduce Bill C-117, an act to provide borrowing authority for the fiscal year beginning on April 1, 1993.

Topic:   BORROWING AUTHORITY ACT, 1993-94 MEASURE TO ENACT
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March 12, 1993

Hon. Thomas Siddon (Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development):

Madam Speaker, this is a very important question raised by the hon. member for Fredericton-York-Sunbury and one which other members have also asked me about.

I should begin by indicating that the majority of the bands which are administered across Canada by chiefs and councils handle their own financial arrangements, both their O and M funding and the capital funding they administer, often under multi-year operating budgets. We call them alternative funding arrangements.

The majority of these communities and their leadership pay their bills and meet their financial obligations. There are exceptions. Our position is both legally and morally that in the spirit of the self-government ethic that First Nations are seeking, the minister of Indian affairs and the government should not guarantee bills which are not paid.

March 12, 1993

Routine Proceedings

There are remedies through the courts and the legal system. It is important for contractors and those who do business with aboriginal communities to realize that they are dealing as they would with any other commercial entity. They are dealing in a situation where contract law must be respected and where it is not, the remedies are to be found through normal legal recourse, notwithstanding my concern that native leaderships live up to their obligations.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
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March 12, 1993

Hon. Thomas Siddon (Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development):

Madam Speaker, I heard the Minister of State for the Environment respond to this question yesterday. She indicated that an appropriate environmental screening of this project was conducted under the provisions of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act and the environmental assessment process.

I was disturbed to learn that we might permit the dumping of such a large amount of steel into Arctic waters. I know the Department of the Environment is similarly concerned. I am told there were public meetings in Resolute before the permit was authorized. In view of the concern that has been expressed by northern leaders, I am told there will be meetings with community representatives to further review those concerns and to see if further appropriate steps are necessary.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ENVIRONMENT
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March 12, 1993

Mr. Siddon:

Can I not get an honourable mention here?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EXCISE TAX ACT
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March 12, 1993

Hon. Thomas Siddon (Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development):

Mr. Speaker, I know that the hon. member for Okanagan-Similkameen-Merritt has a large seniors' population in his constituency. I also know he is a man who would want them to be fully and correctly informed about the facts.

In reading the local newspapers in the member's riding and listening to his intervention today, I have been troubled by the fact that he is not telling the whole story. I think it is important that the record of the House show that is the fact.

In fact, under this government since 1985, but in particular during the last three years, we have seen the net disposable income of our senior citizens increase after correction for inflation and taxes. I think he would want his constituents to know that.

In fact, the policies of this government which have brought inflation down to its lowest level in more than 25 years represent a net saving to Canada's senior citizens, the persons most in need of assistance from the government. Those inflation controls have reduced the escalation of all the costs that senior citizens and the disadvantaged in society have to bear because of the policies of this government.

The GST tax credit, which the member did not speak of, puts dollars right into the pockets of senior citizens. He has not recognized that it offsets any negative impact for the vast majority of Canada's senior citizens. In fact, most of them come out dollars ahead because of the GST tax credit.

I should also point out that the exemption of food, pharmaceutical products and rent from tax also helps senior citizens and the disadvantaged in society.

The bottom line is that the tax on manufacturers was penalizing and crippling Canadian manufacturers and killing jobs in Canada. By removing that tax we have created a situation where there is much more competition in the marketplace.

Prices are lower and there is more variety. I defy the hon. member to go to the Canadian Tire stores, the grocery stores, the shopping centres in his constituency. He will find more variety, more sales and better choices for consumers of higher quality products than ever before. This is because we removed the tax on Canadian manufacturers. He would be irresponsible in suggesting that we do not have to make that tax up in another way, which most Canadians now have come to understand and accept as necessary to avoid creating a mortgage for our grandchildren to pay.

March 12, 1993

The question is simply this: Why does the hon. member not tell the senior citizens and the disadvantaged in his constituency that the disposable income of Canadians is $1,500 greater per capita today than it was three years ago?

During the life of this government the disposable income of Canadians, the additional money they have to spend, has increased. That applies more to senior citizens than to the average middle-income Canadian. It is time he told his constituents the truth and the whole truth and not embellish the truth the way he has done.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   EXCISE TAX ACT
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