Ralph GOODALE

GOODALE, The Hon. Ralph, P.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Regina--Wascana (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
October 5, 1949
Website
http://ralphgoodale.ca
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1a1a9dee-c228-40fc-b926-42f8441d84f0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Email Address
ralph.goodale@parl.gc.ca
Profession
barrister and solicitor, broadcaster, business executive, businessman

Parliamentary Career

July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
LIB
  Assiniboia (Saskatchewan)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Transport (October 10, 1975 - September 30, 1976)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the President of the Privy Council (October 1, 1976 - September 30, 1977)
October 25, 1993 - April 27, 1997
LIB
  Regina--Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Agriculture (November 4, 1993 - January 11, 1995)
  • Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board (November 4, 1993 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (January 12, 1995 - June 10, 1997)
June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board (November 4, 1993 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food (January 12, 1995 - June 10, 1997)
  • Minister of Natural Resources (June 11, 1997 - January 14, 2002)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister responsible for the Canadian Wheat Board (November 4, 1993 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Natural Resources (June 11, 1997 - January 14, 2002)
  • Leader of the Government in the House of Commons (January 15, 2002 - May 25, 2002)
  • Liberal Party House Leader (January 15, 2002 - May 25, 2002)
  • Federal Interlocutor for Metis and Non-Status Indians (January 15, 2002 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Public Works and Government Services (May 26, 2002 - December 11, 2003)
  • Minister of Finance (December 12, 2003 - February 5, 2006)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Finance (December 12, 2003 - February 5, 2006)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Finance (December 12, 2003 - February 5, 2006)
  • Liberal Party House Leader (February 10, 2006 - September 6, 2010)
  • Official Opposition House Leader (February 10, 2006 - September 6, 2010)
October 14, 2008 - March 26, 2011
LIB
  Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Liberal Party House Leader (February 10, 2006 - September 6, 2010)
  • Official Opposition House Leader (February 10, 2006 - September 6, 2010)
May 2, 2011 - August 2, 2015
LIB
  Wascana (Saskatchewan)
October 19, 2015 -
LIB
  Regina--Wascana (Saskatchewan)
  • Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness (November 4, 2015 - )

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1157 of 1158)


October 11, 1974

Mr. Ralph E. Goodale (Assiniboia):

As I begin my brief remarks today I want to extend, as have other members of this House, my congratulations to Mr. Speaker, and those associated with him, on their appointment to office. I am sure it is a great tribute to his electors and to his great abilities that he has been elected to that high office. I know we all wish him well and are confident of his ability to discharge his responsibilities to this House.

When I spoke earlier this week about the urgent problem of the grain handling situation in Vancouver I was a bit preoccupied with that situation and did not have a chance to extend my congratulations. On that topic I am indeed pleased that parliament moved expeditiously to end the tieup at Vancouver. It was a demonstration of this parliament dealing with a situation as speedily as possible. I must admit that in the early stages I was just a little concerned about the possibility of delay through filibuster or some other tactic, but fortunately that did not happen and I think members of this House are to be congratulated.

Particularly, Mr. Speaker, I should like to thank and congratulate the Minister of Labour (Mr. Munro), his parliamentary secretary, and also the government House Leader for the leadership they showed as the legislation moved through the House and in committee. I think enough has been said for the time being on that topic. The grain is beginning to move again and that is good news for all Canadians, especially western farmers.

To all members of this chamber, Mr. Speaker, veterans and freshmen, I want to extend best wishes and congratulations on behalf of Assiniboia constituency. I know the people of my riding are looking forward to a busy and productive parliament.

I do not think I have to provide too much background to this House on the historic constituency of Assiniboia. In almost every parliament it has been a highly visible riding. It has a tradition of vigorous representation and, if I may beg the indulgence of the House, I should like to name some of those who have occupied this seat in this House. There were names like Ross Thatcher, Hazen Argue and, as he is still known in Saskatchewan, Tommy Douglas. They are still a part of that vigorous tradition. Traditionally Assiniboia has not been what one would describe as inconspicuous in this House, and I hope that tradition will continue in some measure at least.

I should like to make special reference in this Throne Speech debate to one particular former member for Assiniboia. He was a very special man and I think he especially deserved the designation "honourable member". He was a tireless worker dedicated to his constituents. He was well spoken and and when he spoke people listened because they knew what was being said had significance. I am sure many members here today, especially those of the class of '68, recall with a keen sense of pride Mr. A. B. Douglas who served Assiniboia so well from 1968 until his untimely passing in 1971.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 11, 1974

Mr. Goodale:

I have found-and this is demonstrated in the case of western Canada-that it is a matter of Canadians putting their ideas together reasonably and fairly. These adverbs are, perhaps, difficult for the opposition to keep in mind. Nevertheless, as I say, it involves Canadians putting their ideas together reasonably and presenting a case fairly to the government. The government, for its part, has demonstrated a willingness to listen whenever a case is made both fairly and reasonably, and a willingness to-

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 11, 1974

Mr. Goodale:

Go right ahead. You will be where you are for many years to come.

I wish to conclude by saying to the House that I expect results from this parliament. I am very optimistic about what can be achieved here if we approach our task in a spirit of co-operation, and I believe that western Canada particularly can look forward to productive action in the years ahead.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 11, 1974

Mr. Goodale:

Mr. Speaker, if hon. members criticize the government as severely for snowfall as they do for our freight rate structure the government may move more quickly with regard to the snow problem but this, I suggest, would not be of much advantage to western Canada.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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October 11, 1974

Mr. Goodale:

I have, indeed, and I found him very receptive. If we want the rest of Canada to understand us, let us try to be constructive and positive in the ideas we put forward, and not always display attitudes which are negative or critical. Western Canadians are not negative and critical by nature, but constructive and positive. They want to build this country and be part of it.

I want to talk now about the opposition's attitude to this question of "selling the case". Again, it has to do with getting the co-operation of our fellow Canadians. To whom should we be selling our case? Since the benches opposite contain a goodly representation from western Canada, the opposition could be very much of assistance. Do we need to sell it in Manitoba, or in Saskatchewan, or in Alberta, or in British Columbia? I suggest not. The selling job, the information job, the arguments, have to be presented in Ontario, in Quebec and in the maritimes because these are the provinces we are asking for co-operation.

Where have most of the speeches made by the western members of the opposition been delivered in the last few years? Had a tally been kept I suggest it would be clear from an examination of the record that most of the speeches were made in western Canada. Madam Speaker, we in western Canada know what the problems are. There is no need for us to hear an explanation. The efforts of honourable members opposite would be more profitably spent if they were to devote their time informing the people of eastern Canada, and the rest of the country, why we need those adjustments in freight rates, why we need a better balance of industrial distribution, why we need regionally-sensitive financial institutions.

When we mr.ke this case to our fellow Canadians, and make it clearly, they are prepared to act. I ask the opposition to assist me, because I propose to take up that task. It is important for Assiniboia, and I hope to get the co-operation of my fellow members opposite, especially those who come from western Canada, in explaining our case to the rest of the country, because they will not understand that case until they know what it is.

I ask the opposition to take part in this new approach, because the government of which I am proud to be a supporter is determined to strive toward the achievement of a new role for western Canada-it really amounts to a

new national policy-to see that we come close to meeting the needs and legitimate aspirations raised at the Western Economic Opportunities Conference.

The government, as I have said, is determined to succeed. Why? It is because the government, under the present Prime Minister has recognized more clearly than any other administration in Canada's history that strong, full and fair participation from each region of the country makes confederation strong, and makes Canada a better place in which to live.

I invite hon. members opposite to share that eventual success, because the effort will, indeed, be successful. Having seen the government in action during and since the Western Economic Opportunities Conference, and having been associated with some of the work which has gone on, I may say there is one thing which perhaps more than any other helped me make up my mind to run in the last election and become a supporter of the government. I believe it has been demonstrated that it is not a matter of sheer numbers or political power that guides the decisions this government makes.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
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