Joseph-Arthur DENIS

DENIS, Joseph-Arthur, M.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
St. Denis (Quebec)
Birth Date
April 26, 1881
Deceased Date
October 1, 1934
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Denis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=19361366-c528-430b-9bee-470c51580e81&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician

Parliamentary Career

March 8, 1922 - September 5, 1925
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)
July 28, 1930 - October 1, 1934
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 47)


June 28, 1934

Mr. DENIS (Translation):

In reply to the hon. Minister of Marine (Mr. Duranleau), may I state that there was no question of a bank of Canada under the Liberal regime, from 1921 to 1930.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS CONSTRUCTION ACT
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June 28, 1934

Mr. DENIS (Translation):

May I point out one thing. If we have, to-day, stamps printed in both official languages of this country, we owe it to the Liberal administration which fulfilled its duty towards the French language, in this country.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS CONSTRUCTION ACT
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June 28, 1934

Mr. DENIS (Translation):

Let the hon.

member for Berthier-Maskinonge have no fear. When the time comes, I shall cooperate, as I have always done in the pa$t, especially for sound and rational measures; I have never refused to accomplish my duty in the house or elsewhere. It is not in introducing such a bill after four years, that the Canadian people will be led to believe that the government carried out its duty and understood the responsibilities that it had to assume in this respect. It is not because the government erects in the town of Berthier, a public building at a cost of $48,000 or $50,000, that it can imagine that it has performed its duty. The government in this respect only proves that it cares very little for the people's money and, to help in electing one of its friends, it has no compunction in having parliament appropriate an amount double to what would be necessary to satisfy the town of Berthier and the whole county. The government showed that it was incapable of administering the finances of this country. That is why the Canadian people will remember, when the polling day comes, to thank the government for its services to Canada

I shall not add anything further, sir, so as not to delay the house. I am aware of the servile majority of which the government disposes. When it is a question of championing our nationality and allowing bilingualism on our bank notes, our good friends opposite, with a few exceptions, thought fit to repudiate the rights of Quebec and the French language, by voting against the amendment moved by the hon. member for Quebec East (Mr. Lapointe). One more thing to stir up the people's regrets and feelings-I shall not say of rebellion-of revenge towards those who, in the face of the country, have, so to speak, repudiated their language to servilely support their leader.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS CONSTRUCTION ACT
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June 28, 1934

Mr. ARTHUR DENIS (St. Denis) (Translation) :

Mr. Speaker, before this debate

ends, I wish to reiterate my request of the other day with reference to the stone cutters of the city of Montreal. I requested the government to kindly specify in the contracts which it would award in erecting buildings in Montreal or elsewhere, that the contractors would have to employ stone cutters to carry out the work, instead of machines. It is obvious that such a provision would be of a nature to considerably decrease the number of unemployed in Montreal and elsewhere. Experts in the matter contend that a machine does the work of 25 men and, therefore, throws 25 workmen on the street. On the other hand, I am told that the stone cut by machines is of an inferior quality to that cut by expert workers.

Often there exists in the rock certain cracks, certain weakness which cannot be discovered by machine work; however, when a workman cuts it, he notices whether it is split, cracked or of inferior quality. The stone cut by machine detracts a good deal from the value of the building. Therefore, I request the government to furnish work to the stone cutters, who are, to-day, among the unemployed in Montreal.

I do not wish to congratulate the government for having submitted to us this bill at the end of the session. "The mountain in labour has brought forth a mouse 1" This government which thought itself important and capable of settling the unemployment crisis in 1930, submits to us, after four years in office, a bill which will permit it to expend $40,000,000 to relieve those who are unemployed since then. It seems to be an important event, but let me assure you, sir, that it does not amount to much. It is not a permanent remedy to cure unemployment, it is an artificial, a temporary measure which will amount to nothing, unless it be for a few months this year. The government thinks, thanks to such a measure, that the Canadian people will forget the 1930 promises and its inertia heretofore! Being acquainted with its rule for the last four years, especially during this session, the Canadian people realize perfectly that they were wrong in replacing the Liberal regime by this one and

will again repose their trust in us They will replace this government by a Liberal one. If one examines specially this session's legislation, one might conclude that the goverment did its utmost to create positions, carry on patronage and thus endeavour to capture the confidence of the Canadian people. I wish to protest, sir, because so little work has been set aside for Quebec.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS CONSTRUCTION ACT
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June 28, 1934

Mr. DENIS (Translation):

That is no reason to invoke. If in the past errors were committed, if there was neglect, it is not a reason to always follow the same path. When means are offered to us to redress such wrongs and to adopt a reasonable suggestion, like the amendment of the hon. member for Quebec East moved, I see no reason not to acquiesce, when our good friends, the English Canadians of this country, are well disposed towards us I wish to thank these English friends on this side of the house, who unanimously supported the amendment of the hon. member for Quebec East and who proved thereby, that they desire union, harmony and bonne entente and, especially that they desire to give to the French Canadian race the legitimate share to which it has a right.

Mr. Speaker, I shall close my remarks by these few words.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS CONSTRUCTION ACT
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