Samuel Francis GLASS

GLASS, Samuel Francis

Personal Data

Party
Unionist
Constituency
Middlesex East (Ontario)
Birth Date
January 8, 1861
Deceased Date
April 6, 1925
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Francis_Glass
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=173a947c-154b-45f1-8a2c-0a9d2d992309&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
insurance broker, real estate agent

Parliamentary Career

October 21, 1913 - October 6, 1917
CON
  Middlesex East (Ontario)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Middlesex East (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 4 of 51)


May 25, 1921

Mr. GLASS:

The amendment of the hon. member for South Oxford embodies practically the main features of the request of the National Dairymen's Association to the Government as recited by the hon. member for Guysborough this afternoon and repeated by me later. Like the hon. member for Shelburne and Queen's, I do not like this temporising, for I think it creates unrest and dissatisfaction, and heaven knows at the present time our farmers have enough anxiety and worry over the very sudden deflation of the commodities they produce. I have no doubt that the views of the Dairymen's Association have been placed before the Government, and I should like to see those views given effect to and the measure made permanent.

To fully satisfy the needs of our dairy industry the Minister of Finance should also remove the unjust discrimination against butter in favour of oleomargarine.

The manufacturers of oleomargarine have stated that about 75 per cent of its constituent parts is made from products of the farm. The hon. member for South Oxford says that that is not so. At any rate there is no doubt that a very large proportion of the ingredients are the byproducts of the farm, and naturally that makes a market for what otherwise would to some extent command a much lower price. Therefore to that extent it is to the interest of farmers that these fats may be used to manufacture a commodity that brings a better price.

I certainly think the amendment is entirely in accord with the sentiments I expressed on the floor of the House, and with the wishes of the National Dairymen's Association, and I trust the Government will see fit to accept it. I am satisfied that the measure would be far better if it were made to apply permanently, not only to allay unrest and anxiety on the part of our farmers, but also on the part of the manufacturers of oleomargarine, because as the hon. member for Winnipeg pointed out, the institution which contemplated starting the manufacture of oleomargarine in the West *toll no doubt hesitate unless they have some certainty of a permanent market.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 20, 1921

Mr. GRASS:

It does not designate the quantity.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
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May 20, 1921

Mr. GLASS:

This item naturally affects the manufacturers of extracts.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
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May 14, 1921

Mr. GLASS:

Could my hon. friend tell the House what are the per capita imports of the United States and the per capita imports of Canada? They would have a material bearing on this question.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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March 31, 1921

Mr. GLASS:

I am informed that yarn that would spin sixty lea was of ample fineness for the purposes of manufacturing aeroplane cloth, which was the matter * l principal importance at that time. It has been stated by a prominent linen manufacturer that ninety per cent of the production of all linens in the world are manufactured from yarns that are spun under one hundred lea of fineness, We have already produced yarns in this country that have spun up to one hundred lea, which is an exceptionally fine quality. We need not worry ourselves if we are unable to produce a quality fine enough to compete with the finer yarns spun from Belgium flax retted in the Courtrai district. If we can produce a quality sufficiently high to be included in the ninety per cent of the

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total world production, we are producing an article which, I think, should command sufficient sympathy from this House to ensure its development. My hon. friend from Cape Breton said he thought we were helping the farmers. Well, so we are. If we can develop the spinning of a finer degree of yarn by developing our own spinning facilities, naturally it follow's that the onus is on the grower to produce a finer fibre that will give us the better quality of yarn. An acre of flax will produce three hundred pounds of fibre, and that fibre may be worth anywhere from fifteen cents per pound to seventy-five cents per pound, according to quality. Whatever be the quality of the fibre, it has taken the same amount of labour and the same area of land. But it is a matter of great importance to the producer whether he gets fifteen cents a pound or seventy-five cents for the product. It is a total difference of $1,200 per ton in price, or as will be seen, $180 an acre. I think that we should urge our people to produce, not so much with a view to quantity a~s for the purpose of securing as good a quality as can possibly be had, because it is in the hope that we may produce an article of the highest quality that we shall ultimately displace Russian flax from the American, and even from the Irish, markets. Russia will not bother us in the production of flax for a few years to come, and unless she improves her methods she will not be a serious competitor in the higher grades. But if our ambition stops at the coarser grades, then Russia will be a serious competitor against us in the years ahead. In order to encourage this industry a bounty of $25,000 a year was granted by Order in Council as a maximum to be continued for a period of three years.

Now people might naturally say, in fact the statement was made at the time, "There may be half a dozen mills start up, and in that case we will not get this bounty on our production. We will only get the bounty in the ratio that our production bears to the entire production; and it may be that if five or six mills were producing enough to absorb $100,000 on the basis of the bounty given, that each mill would only get twenty-five per cent of that bounty to which it might be entitled if there was not competition." Nevertheless we hoped the assistance given would attract the Irish mills to this country, and that we would ultimately develop a large and extensive spinning industry in this country, because

it follows as surely as that the night follows the day that to develop the spinning industry means the development of the growing industry, and that is where the advantage to the farmer comes in. I submit that in fairness to the manufacturer who started the mill in question, it , is our duty to keep faith with him. I hope that if we keep faith with him we will find before the expiration of the term for which this bounty is granted, other large firms in Ireland desirous of establishing mills in this country.

Topic:   THE AUDITOR GENERAL'S REPORT
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