William Cameron EDWARDS

EDWARDS, The Hon. William Cameron

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Russell (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 7, 1844
Deceased Date
September 17, 1921
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Cameron_Edwards
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1731ef95-36db-4e61-9a7f-e27e0ed02f1c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

February 22, 1887 - January 9, 1888
LIB
  Russell (Ontario)
May 7, 1888 - February 3, 1891
LIB
  Russell (Ontario)
March 5, 1891 - April 24, 1896
LIB
  Russell (Ontario)
June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Russell (Ontario)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Russell (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 363)


July 14, 1943

Mr. EDWTARDS:

I have not the slightest

doubt he did, and in that he was aided and abetted by others in the armed forces, a practice which is not unknown to old soldiers. He was a fine patriotic citizen, but the fact that he was permitted to pass, I believe, three medical examinations before he was eventually sent back to this country as unfit for service raised doubts in my mind as to the propriety of the medical examinations that are given brave men who offer their lives in the service of their country. I think the figures quoted disprove the foundation for the argument advanced by the hon. member for Swift Current. But it was not with respect to that that I rose to question the minister. I was prompted by the question directed to the minister by the hon. member for Edmonton East. I did not know this department had a wing of the civic hospital, which, apparently, it built and operates or to which it contributes. In Calgary we are fortunate in having what we are led to believe will be, when completed, one of the most modern and most completely equipped hospitals to be found anywhere in Canada or perhaps on this continent, for all of which we are duly grateful and appreciative. I commend the minister and his department for having provided, even at this late date, a fine hospital for our pensioners. I think it was a disgrace that the building on 8th avenue should have been used as a hospital all these years; I am sure the rents paid would have been sufficient to build two or three first class hospitals.

I come now to a question which has bothered me, as a result of the discussion which has been precipitated here by hon. members from the fair city of Toronto, in regard to the location of these hospitals. I was of opinion not only that the hospital in Calgary was badly located from every point of view, but that the new hospital might properly have

War Appropriation-Pensions and National Health

been located where I, as a layman, naturally would think a hospital should be situated- in some place with broad grounds, away from the noise, dust, smoke and distraction of city life. But every doubt or misgiving that I had in regard to the location of the new hospital in Calgary was answered, to my satisfaction at least, by one consideration, namely, the representations of the pensioners themselves. When the Canadian Legion and the representatives of these invalid soldiers come forward and say, "We want a hospital, not out in the foothills, not out on the shores of a lake but as centrally located as we can get it, so that we may have access to the movies and to the attractions afforded by a downtown district, where we will be readily accessible to our friends and relatives who want to come and see us," that settles it for me. When I am told by the men and women whose duty it is to wait upon these soldiers that the men undergoing treatment want to be downtown in the city, for the reasons I have mentioned, I say that where the soldiers want it is where it shall be, as far as I am concerned. I believe that that consideration should outweigh all others, because if the soldier undergoing treatment would'be unhappy or lonesome, no matter how beautiful the grounds might be in some remote district, where his friends would have difficulty in getting to him and he would not see the people going by, then I say the wish of the soldiers should determine the location of the hospital. I should like to hear some expression from the minister as to what the soldiers undergoing treatment in Christie Street hospital have to say with regard to the location of the hospital and what they would say if, as has been advocated, the hospital should be located six or eight miles from downtown Toronto.

I should like the minister to state also the policy of his department in regard to the suggestion I have heard enunciated and which I would understand has been carried out in some cases at least, that at certain points his department cooperates with the municipal authorities in building additions to civic hospitals, and under what circumstances that will be done, if at all. I am reminded now that at the time the new hospital in Calgary was being considered, very strong representations were made to the department that it might well cooperate with the city of Calgary in building a new civic hospital, so that I should like to know whether there is any principle underlying the policy of the department

of not going into partnership with municipal authorities in the construction of hospitals for pensioners.

Topic:   OUT OF WORK BENEFITS
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March 16, 1936

Mr. EDWAUDS:

Is there any change in this item?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CANADA-UNITED STATES TRADE AGREEMENT
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May 23, 1930

Mr. EDVARDS (Waterloo):

What were the importations from Great Britain of this item?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 23, 1930

Mr. EDWLARDS (Waterloo):

I think the minister can readily understand that there are tools which require special engineering, drafting and patterns. In the machine shop to which the hon. member for Lincoln (Mr. Chaplin) referred 25 per cent of the business is of a special nature. That machine shop is as well equipped as any machine shop in America. It may be however that these machines are standard in the United States, and for that reason they are willing to pay the 20 per cent duty.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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June 3, 1921

Mr. EDWARDS:

Yes. It is true that the proportion of export is not large. We must look abroad more and more for markets for our surplus production of butter, and we shall be forced to do so increasingly because of the favour which is being shown to oleomargarine. There can be no question in anyone's mind that olemargarine takes the place of butter, and the introduction of that article of food into this country in ever increasing quantities means the displacement proportionately of the home production of butter, driving us into foreign markets to sell our over-production. Last year we introduced into this country, in round numbers, about 7,000,000 pounds of oleomargarine, and that forced us to look abroad for the sale of that much of our butter. We are disposing of our surplus butter to some thirty-five or forty different countries, and our product has to come in competition with that of certain countries, which have taken very careful means to establish an international reputation for their product, such as New Zealand, Austrialia-Australia not to the same extent, of course, as New Zealand- Denmark and Holland, all of which have for years developed this matter scientifically and obtained an international name in the foreign markets for their product by a careful system of standardizing for export. We have to compete with that, and it seems to me that so far as our Canadian product is concerned, the time is past due when we should do something to secure for our butter an international reputation if it is to compete successfully with the products of other countries which are carefully graded and systematically handled as is the product of New Zealand, Denmark, and other places. If there is any one province of Canada more than another which is interested in the passing of this Bill and the proper grading of dairy products, it is the province of Quebec. Ontario has won the honours so far as the quality of cheese is concerned; that is to say, Ontario produces a larger percentage of cheese of number one grade than does the province of Quebec. But while Ontario has forged to the front in that respect in regard to butter the province of Quebec leads every other province in the Dominion in the percentage of first-class production. I shall give some figures which go back to the year 1917. I have not taken the time to get figures later than that, but I do not think that I am giving ancient history in the figures I submit now, and I think they may be taken as fairly indicative of conditions as they are at present.

In 1917, of our cheese production of over 1,000,000 boxes exported from Ontario, 93.38 per cent graded as No. 1, for which we were entitled to receive the highest prices: 6.42 per cent graded as No. 2; and .20 per cent graded No. 3. In Quebec, of 755,000 boxes sold, only 70.88 per cent graded No. 1; 27.13 per cent graded No.

2 and 1.99 per cent graded No. 3. Of Prince Edward Island's output, of 17,000 boxes, 90.85 per cent graded No. 1; .9 per cent graded No. 2; and 1.5 per cent graded No. 3. For all Canada 84.22 per cent graded No. 1.

Topic:   GRADING OF DAIRY PRODUCE
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