Thomas Ashmore KIDD

KIDD, Thomas Ashmore, V.D.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Kingston City (Ontario)
Birth Date
May 1, 1889
Deceased Date
December 19, 1973
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Kidd_(politician)
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=172b8451-b115-4c78-8c2b-fc8bdaf5aa9d&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manufacturer, representative

Parliamentary Career

June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Kingston City (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 35)


February 8, 1949

Mr. Kidd:

May I direct a question to the right hon. the Prime Minister? It has to do with the education of veterans. I notice that veterans affairs comes under section 38, but I do not see the word "education" mentioned in section 38, so I am taking this opportunity of asking my question. The Prime Minister may be familiar with the educational system in Newfoundland. There are no universities in Newfoundland and a student wishing to receive advanced education, after receiving first or second year college, has to go to Dalhousie, McGill, Queen's or varsity. The student finishes his education and takes his degree there. The result has been that a great many Newfoundlanders who came to Canada for their education remained in Canada. There were those, of course, who had to go back because of some business association in the island. I may say that Canada has benefited during the past thirty or forty years from the large number of Newfoundlanders who have remained here upon completion of their education.

In the universities at the present time we have the veterans of world war II. Will the veterans who are attending university today, and those who come in next year, receive the same grants? My question might be directed through you, Mr. Chairman, to the Minister of

Newfoundland

Veterans Affairs. I know this matter has been taken up, and that the student veterans in university today get $60 and $80. I have in mind particularly the veteran who today is taking a medical course, who has perhaps another three or four years ahead of him-it is a long course-and whose money is running out.

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF TERMS OF UNION WITH CANADA
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May 27, 1948

1. Has the Royal Canadian Mounted Police offices in Kingston?

2. If so, where are these offices located?

3. Has the lease expired or when does it expire?

4. What rent do they pay?

5. How long have they occupied these premises?

6. Are any arrangements being made for them to occupy new premises? If so, where and what rent do they intend to pay?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   R.C.M.P.-KINGSTON OFFICES
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May 24, 1948

1. Has the wartime prices and trade board offices in Kingston?

2. If so, how many persons are now employed there?

3. Where are these offices located?

Inquiries oj the Ministry

4. Has the lease expired or when does it expire?

5. What rent do they pay?

6. How long have they occupied these premises?

7. Are any arrangements being made for them to occupy new premises? If so, where and what rent do they intend to pay?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD-KINGSTON OFFICES
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May 12, 1948

Mr. KIDD:

I should like to add a word to what has been said already in reference to this bill. Already the committee has listened with interest to the remarks of the Minister of Veterans Affairs and other hon. members who have expressed their views. The purpose of this bill is to authorize increases in the basic rates of pension. Certain other minor amendments of an administrative nature are also incorporated. Last evening we concluded the general discussion of the bill, and now we are dealing with section 2, on which I think my remarks will be in order.

It will be noted that section 1 deals with the permanent force, but in all the discussion that has taken place thus far no reference has been made to permanent force cases. I am exercising my prerogative to bring to the attention of the minister one case which has been brought to me within the last few days.

This is the case of a permanent force veteran who served in both world wars; and I mention it because I believe there are many similar cases which should receive attention. The veteran's name is Leonard Tritsch, and his number was P-8964. He is an ex-sergeant of the R.C.H.A. Friends of his brought the case to my attention, and I have taken it up with the minister. This man served in the Royal Garrison Artillery of the imperial army from 1906 to 1919, during which time he had active service in England and France. After world war I, he enlisted in the R.C.H.A. in Canada and served from 1926 until 1939, when he joined the active service and served until his discharge on November 13, 1946, being later assessed as a one hundred per cent disability. On discharge his service pension, after twenty years of service, entitled him to $8925.

I emphasize the words "service pension." This veteran suffered a stroke on January 18, 1948, and was under the care of the Department of Veterans Affairs until March 11, during which period he received one hundred per cent pay and allowances. He left the hospital totally disabled and is unlikely to recover. Here is a veteran with twenty years of continuous service in the permanent force, yet. the pension board has reduced his pension from one hundred per cent to forty per cent.

Here is what they ruled in his case, and I quote the exact words:

1. Incurred during permanent force service Canada, not pensionable as it did not arise out of nor was it directly connected' with such military service, pre-enlistment to active force service, aggravated two-fifths during that service in Canada. Effective from date of A.F. discharge.

2. Incurred during permanent force service Canada but not pensionable as they did not arise out of nor were they directly connected with such service, pre-enlistment to active force service, not aggravated during that service.

I say the findings in this case are absurd. Here is a man with twenty years of service in the Canadian permanent force and another thirteen years in the imperial army; yet they claim his disability is not directly attributable to that service. As it stands now, if this man died today his pension would cease, since the pension commission has reduced his disability from one hundred per cent to forty per cent, and his widow would be left penniless. That is a point I cannot emphasize too strongly.

In view of this particular case, and to avoid bringing up similar cases, I would recommend to the minister that in all cases dealing with permanent force N.C.O.'s and other ranks for pension purposes, a senior ranking permanent force officer, appointed perhaps by the adjutant general, fully versed in the Pension Act, should be present when the case is considered by the pension commission. I hope the minister sees my point. This man was employed by His Majesty's government for over twenty years. His case was dealt with by the pension commission, and I believe that when a member of the permanent force has his case reviewed by that board there should be some person from the permanent force there to speak on his behalf.

Topic:   PENSION ACT
Subtopic:   RATES OP PENSION FOR DISABILITY AND DEATH- SALARIES OF PENSION COMMISSIONERS
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May 3, 1948

1. What is the total poundage of Canadian cheese exported to Great Britain each year, from 1920 to 1947?

2. What is the total amount of subsidy paid on cheese during each of the respective years?

3. What is the total poundage of butter exported to Great Britain each year from 1920 to 1947?

4. What is the total amount of subsidy paid on butter during each of the respective years?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CHEESE EXPORTS AND SUBSIDIES
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