Joseph-Arthur BRADETTE

BRADETTE, The Hon. Joseph-Arthur, B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Cochrane (Ontario)
Birth Date
October 16, 1886
Deceased Date
September 12, 1961
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph-Arthur_Bradette
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=17232084-6a45-4ebd-bd5d-cab516ff3bfd&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, merchant

Parliamentary Career

September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Timiskaming North (Ontario)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Timiskaming North (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Cochrane (Ontario)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Cochrane (Ontario)
  • Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons (February 25, 1943 - April 16, 1945)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Cochrane (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Cochrane (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 451)


September 11, 1950

Mr. Bradeite:

Feel sorry for yourself.

Topic:   PROVISION FOR CONTROL AND REGULATION OF PRODUCTION, DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF ESSENTIAL MATERIALS AND SERVICES
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June 8, 1950

Mr. Bradefte:

I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Trade and Commerce. The sum of $5,000 was decided by the Prime Minister himself. We all appreciate what he did in this respect, and Canadian people will appreciate it too. But personally, not knowing the situation of his office in all its detail, I believe that the sum of $5,000 is too high a percentage to be taken from his emolument. I believe that twenty per cent would be sufficient. It is not necessary that the amount should remain fixed rigidly at $5,000. Twenty per cent would be $3,000, which in my opinion would be more reasonable.

After all, the prime minister not only has the obligations of the prime minister to fulfil and all the responsibilities that this high office entails but is called upon in connection with all sorts of good causes and activities. When the late lamented Viscount Bennett was prime minister I remember that he himself told me that there was not a single day in which he did not have fifty calls made upon him, on his own money. If he had had only the emolument of his office, it would never have been possible for him to take care of them. There is no doubt that the calls on the Prime Minister are as great, if not greater, at the present time; I am sure he would have at least fifty calls a day involving payments out of his salary. We are speaking in terms of dollars and cents at the present time. It is just as important for the prime minister to live comfortably as it is for others; and it is important that he personally be kept free from annoyances of a financial nature which sometimes are exceedingly depressing. I believe that twenty per cent of the emolument of the prime minister should be sufficient. I believe that it would be satisfactory to the Prime Minister himself and to the whole of Canada if such an amendment were made to this clause.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S RESIDENCE
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June 8, 1950

Mr. Bradette:

I feel that there is only one way for me to vote on section 5. Until the emoluments of the office of prime minister of this country are increased from $15,000 to $25,000 or $30,000 per year, I shall have to vote against the section. I believe that this country is not being fair to the prime minister. As an example, I could cite men in my constituency who are working for large corporations and Who are receiving from two to three times the salary of the prime minister of this country. I believe those people deserve all they are getting, they are worthy of their hire, for they are working for large mining and corporation interests. I repeat that I do not see how it is possible for this committee to pass section 5 without a promise that parliament will rectify the anomaly that I have just mentioned.

During the general discussion on the first section of the bill, some members mentioned the cost of the food. Surely Canada ought to be able to provide adequately for the prime minister without quibbling about such details as the cost of the food. After all, we voted tremendous sums of money to send food to other countries for which we do not expect any repayment and over which expenditure we practically have no control. Surely it is the duty of this parliament to see to it that if this item is passed, then within a reasonable time, and not later than early next session, the emoluments of the office of prime minister and of the members of the cabinet are properly dealt with.

Someone said that a future prime minister might not be able to pay $5,000 a year. We parliamentarians realize what it means to be mere members of parliament and the calls that are made upon us. I may say that I am satisfied with what I am receiving

as a member of parliament, but how much money can any member save if he accedes to the requests made of him, and logically made, by his constituents?

On the other hand, consider the position of the prime minister, who always keeps himself at the entire disposal of every citizen and organization of this country. Let us visualize for a moment what the establishment of this government house will mean. It will come next to Rideau Hall as the rendezvous of officials, the place for receptions for prominent people from Canada and the rest of the world. Surely, we cannot afford to be niggardly about a matter of this kind.

Mention was made during the discussion of the estimated cost of the house, $100,000 or $200,000. If we cannot afford to provide proper accommodation for our prime minister, and to see that he gets a salary befitting his office, then this parliament does not seem to be fulfilling its duty in relation to matters such as this. The only way I can vote for section 5 is to have a promise that the emoluments of the office of prime minister will be increased before the next session. I am sure the majority of the people would wish that this be done.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PRIME MINISTER'S RESIDENCE
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April 20, 1950

Mr. Bradeile:

It would.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   PRECEDENCE OF GOVERNMENT BUSINESS ON APRIL 24 AND 26 AND EVERY WEDNESDAY THEREAFTER
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April 3, 1950

Mr. J. A. Bradelie (Cochrane):

Mr. Speaker, on a question of privilege, I ask your indulgence for a few moments in order that I may bring to the attention of the house what we called the "Marcel Boivin trip."

On Thursday afternoon of last week a party consisting of forty-two members of this house, twenty-one of whom were accompanied by their wives, left Ottawa for a three-day trip to Granby, Quebec, the princess city of the eastern townships. In this group every province of Canada was represented, as well as every political party in the federal field. On arriving at our destination we received a civic reception from the nationally known and dynamic mayor of Granby, Mr. P. H. Boivin, who was accompanied by his charming wife and the members of the municipal council. His Worship remained with us throughout the whole of our stay, and his exuberance, his personality, his wide knowledge of affairs in general, his faith in the future of his city, of his province and of Canada, impressed us very much. He also made us familiar with the great progress already made in that area, as well as its hopes and aspirations for the future, with the inevitable problems that have to be faced and solved.

Numerous and extensive visiting tours were well organized, allowing us to visit several industries, such as the Granby Elastic Web, the Verney corporation, the Miner Rubber Company, the Imperial Tobacco Company, the Granby Co-operative, the Racine Manufacturing Company-just to name a few. Everywhere we were received with courtesy, and we were given the opportunity to make a thorough inspection of these plants in full operation. In the course of conversation it was easy to realize the spirit of co-operation and understanding that exists between labour and management, and at every function both were well represented.

The fine hospitality which is always to the fore in the province of Quebec was manifested by our hosts and by everyone else

with whom we came in contact. I am convinced that all those who made this trip feel that they know more about their country than they did before.

We were inspired by seeing in practice the real unity of the two parent races, and this was at once made evident by the fact that the population of Granby is made up of twenty per cent of English-speaking descent and eighty per cent of French-speaking descent. Its citizens speak the two official languages of our country.

I also wish to express appreciation to the Canadian Pacific and the Canadian National for the fine service they gave us, which made our trip a most pleasant and comfortable one.

Before resuming my seat there is another pleasant duty that I wish to perform. I know that in doing so I am voicing the sentiments of my colleagues. It is to present to the hon. member for Shefford (Mr. Boivin), and to Mrs. Boivin, our most heartfelt thanks and appreciation for the very efficient manner in which this tour was organized. The full success of the visit was undoubtedly due to the great care the hon. member took in its preparation, and to his constant presence with his guests. His activities, which made this journey possible, enabled us to see the extraordinary strides that have been made in commerce and industry in his home city. There we met a number of able businessmen, who have contributed their talents and courage in the building up of a prosperous business centre. We also readily perceived that the progress they have made is not attributable only to the efforts of a relatively small group; a large part of the credit must go to the persevering work of the whole population, which is proud of its municipality and anxious to see it progressing in every department.

It will always be with pleasure and gratitude that we shall remember those most agreeable and instructive days.

Topic:   VISIT TO GRANBY, QUE., BY MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
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