David Arnold CROLL

CROLL, The Hon. David Arnold, P.C., Q.C., LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Spadina (Ontario)
Birth Date
March 12, 1900
Deceased Date
June 11, 1991
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Croll
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=16a359f2-d18b-45d6-be33-975d6e117d7c&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  Spadina (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  Spadina (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Spadina (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 131 of 132)


November 5, 1945

Mr. CROLL:

Mr. Chairman, in rising to speak on this question I am going to try to clear up some confusion and some misunderstanding and a great deal of honest difference of opinion about union practices and union terms and their meanings. I find that in this house there are various members who know a great deal about labour and who use union terms and give them various meanings, and so in my allotted time I am going to endeavour to clarify that situation and give to the house a bird's-eye view of the present labour machinery and make a suggestion that I hope will be helpful.

I will start by defining what collective bargaining is. It is a bargaining agency elected by the employees and which is not dominated, coerced or improperly influenced by the employer in any manner, by way of financial aid or otherwise, and so it presupposes that it is based upon honest intentions on both sides and that there is good will around the table. It does not for a moment contemplate synthetic bargaining-that is, sitting around a table and one party or the other shaking its head from left to right. I make reference

Ford Motor Plant Strike

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR AIR
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November 5, 1945

Mr. CROLL:

I did not know that. I have read all the press. In any event we have the situation where the union have attached some conditions. It is not too late. I hesitate to say any more than I have said to-day, but I do say this; We have reached the stage where something needs to be done. If the company has turned it down; if the men have turned it down, some, action is required whether we like it or not. In order to be fair both to the company and to the union.

Ford Motor Plant Strike

it is necessary that the government, in view of the lack of machinery, step in. I think it is obvious that, in order to avoid possible bloodshed, the government should step in immediately and put a controller in charge who will take over.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR AIR
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November 5, 1945

Mr. CROLL:

I agree entirely. I want to

point out that strikers never want an industry to fold up. No industry ever folded up because it gave its workers good wages and good conditions. All the workers want is a share of the good things in life. If this strike is broken, the Ford company will not have won a victory. All it will mean is that guerrilla warfare will be carried on throughout the whole country until the forces are once more marshalled for a new deployment under different conditions, perhaps under new leaders.

I thought, when the proposition was put forward by the minister, that it would not be accepted. I pointed out to him that in asking the men to go back to work while the matter was arbitrated he was asking a good deal. Men look upon that as being, not only a loss of prestige, but a loss of the strike, no matter what verdict may be given. I do not think the situation is hopeless at all. I think we have been a little too quick on the draw. I should not say "we"; I think the province of Ontario has been too quick on the draw. We must not forget that an offer was made to the company a few days before, the offer was made to the employees. They came back with some suggestions, but we have not as yet heard from the company. If the company accepts I am sure the union will reconsider their view.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE FOR AIR
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November 1, 1945

Mr. CROLL:

Louder.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL DEFENCE (ARMY)
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October 3, 1945

Mr. D. A. CROLL (Spadina):

In rising to speak on this question I realize that there has been some difference in the house as to whether the war is over or not. I think we are all agreed, though, that we are now passing through the transition period, at least in its first stages; and the productive machinery, the governmental machinery of the country and the outlook and trend are definitely from war to peace.

I agree with other hon. members in the house that the ultimate goal for all Canadians is social and economic security; but the path there, Mr. Speaker, is not strewn with roses, because to-day we have not only a multitude of new problems but also some old problems, and I am speaking of one old problem. I know something of this problem because I administered old age pensions in the province of Ontario as a member of the government, and under present changing conditions not only must we give consideration to the problem but we must do something about revising the Old Age Pensions Act.

It is only fair to say that the government have been aware of the problems. In 1943, by order in council, the amount was raised from $240 to $300, and in 1944 it was raised from $365 to $425 to pensioners.

Topic:   OLD AGE PENSIONS
Subtopic:   AGE AND INCOME REQUIREMENTS-PROPOSED INCREASE IN AMOUNTS PAYABLE
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