Azellus DENIS

DENIS, The Hon. Azellus, P.C., Q.C., B.A., LL.B.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Saint-Denis (Quebec)
Birth Date
March 26, 1907
Deceased Date
September 4, 1991
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azellus_Denis
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1647b84c-1764-48b8-a6af-5e29cbded7d7&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
LIB
  St. Denis (Quebec)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
LIB
  St-Denis (Quebec)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
LIB
  Saint-Denis (Quebec)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
LIB
  Saint-Denis (Quebec)
March 31, 1958 - April 19, 1962
LIB
  Saint-Denis (Quebec)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
LIB
  Saint-Denis (Quebec)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
LIB
  Saint-Denis (Quebec)
  • Postmaster General (April 22, 1963 - February 2, 1964)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 325)


December 18, 1963

Mr. Denis:

1. Once per week, Tuesday.

2. Yes, under normal conditions. Delays occurred on seven occasions because of weather conditions.

3. Vancouver to Nanaimo, B.C. Pony Express Ltd. Nanaimo to Port Alberni, Alert Service Transfer Ltd.; Port Alberni to Tofino, Long Beach Transportation Ltd.; Tofino to Ahousat, Tofino Tug and Barge Co.

4. $1,194.32, December 1, 1962 to November 30, 1963.

Note: Since December 11, 1963 Ahousat is served once per week on Friday by the Vancouver and Fair harbour water route which is operated by the Northland Navigation Co. Mr. H. Clarke, postmaster, Ahousat, conveys the mail between the post office and the wharf.

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MAIL SERVICE, AHOUSAT, B.C.
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December 18, 1963

Mr. Denis:

1. No request received. The postmaster resigned.

2. No. Mrs. Ruby McLaine was not appointed postmaster. She was placed in temporary charge pending an appointment.

3. Tenders are not called to fill positions of postmasters. Postmasters of offices in this group are appointed by the Postmaster General.

4. No. A change of ownership of a building housing a post office does not affect the selection of a new postmaster when such a position becomes vacant.

5. Postmasters of post offices in this group are paid a salary which covers the work performed and the provision of adequate and suitable accommodation.

6. $1,080.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE, MONO CENTRE, ONT.
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December 18, 1963

Mr. Denis:

Mr. Chairman, allow me to thank all hon. members and all those who contributed to the passage of my estimates. I thank them for the flowers, but somewhat less for the thorns. Fortunately, they were not too prickly and I think I can stand it.

However, with regard to my possible appointment to the Senate, it would be difficult for me to satisfy everybody. Some people want to send me to the other place, and others want to keep me here. I cannot cut myself in two and I suggest that the decision should be left to those responsible. Then we will know if the house loses or the Senate gains.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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December 18, 1963

Hon. Azellus Denis (Postmaster General):

In presenting the estimates for the department for this year, I can surely not be accused of patronage since these estimates have been initiated and prepared by our honourable friends opposite.

Under these circumstances, naturally, you will permit me to be somewhat restricted in my praise, while being fair towards my coworkers by chance.

Since the annual report of the department for the year 1962-63 has not yet been tabled- it is at the printers-I will allow myself to outline the most important points, then to comment on our 1963-64 estimates, and finally, to inform the house of the initiation of reforms and decisions undertaken by the department since the coming into power of the present

government, and in doing this, I will necessarily limit the number outlined in order not to prolong the debate.

The year 1962-63 was to the Post Office Department, a most significant year of re-organization. Following the report of the royal commission on government organization, every effort was made to incorporate those recommendations of the commission which pertained to the department and which were under the department's jurisdiction.

The changes made emphasized, to a great extent, the decentralization of authority and responsibility to the benefit of officers in the field. As a result, many decisions will be made in the field, providing better service to the public, as field officers will be empowered to make many decisions on the spot rather than wait for approval from headquarters. The changeover is also expected to eliminate much correspondence between headquarters and the field. Headquarters, of course, still remain responsible for formulation of policy and headquarters officers will be in a better position to spend more time on this aspect of the work.

The 1962-63 fiscal year shows total receipts amounting to $222,358,848 while our disbursements totalled $218,872,399 leaving a surplus of $3,486,449.

This compares quite favourably with the figures recorded in 1960-61 and 1961-62, which showed deficits in round figures of $4.7 million and $1.2 million respectively. We must, however, take into account salary increases to post office personnel, which amount to $230,000 and which must be charged to the year 1961-62 and credited to the year 1962-63. On the other hand, we must also debit the retroactive part, amounting to $4,887,076, of the recent salary increases paid during the current year, which should be charged to the fiscal year 1962-63. These retroactive increases produce a real deficit of about $1 million for that year, rather than the surplus of about $3.5 million.

Letter carrier service was inaugurated at Summerside, P.E.I., Oromocto, N.B., Thornhill, Ontario, Ste. Rose, Quebec and Hawkes-bury, Ontario. In addition, 207 additional letter carrier walks were placed in operation, bringing to 3,113,765 the number of calls where letter carriers provide door to door mail delivery. The increase in the number of calls is less than in previous years. This is a result of the reduced expenditure program undertaken by the government during the year under review. The 5,640 rural routes now in operation across Canada have brought this service to an all-time high, serving 645,115 householders.

Post office activities in the field of labour relations saw improved procedures in regard to truck drivers who are employed by contractors for major mail transportation services. Clauses have been inserted in the post office contracts with carriers establishing a minimum hourly wage determined by the Department of Labour. Other clauses incorporated in the contracts deal with annual holidays with pay.

During the year the volume of mail handled showed an increase of 3.94 per cent over the figures for 1961-62. It should be noted that, due to increased efficiency and more effective planning, this increased volume of mail was handled by a staff increase of only one half of one per cent.

The increases and improvements in service that I have described-in letter carrier service, in rural route service, in mail volume and in revenue figures-are the result of the normal growth of the postal service in an expanding economy and a growing population. These increases have been accompanied by an increase in the costs of salaries, transportation and equipment, which are also a normal product of an expanding service.

This pattern of normal growth is reflected in the statistical review of the year 1962-63. While these statistics will be presented in detail on the tabling of the Postmaster General's report, I should like to mention just a few of them here. For instance, departmental revenues increased by almost $9 million in 1962-63 over the previous year. Similarly, departmental expenditures increased by about $4 million during the same period. These figures do not, as I mentioned earlier, include back-dated salary increases which result in a net deficit for the year.

So much for the past. The total departmental estimates for 1963-64 are $191,704,000, which represent an increase of $1,113,500 over last year, taking into consideration supple-mentaries for both years. It should be noted that salary and transportation increases, factors over which the department has little control, account for the bulk of this figure, which has only been kept down to this level by savings made in these and other areas of expenditures.

Our increased expenditures will be met to a large extent by increased postal rates and fees which I announced some months ago. With the new rates, we have calculated that the department will about break even over the next three-year period. It should be noted that without the recent increases, the department's anticipated deficit over the next three years would have been nearly $15 million.

28902-5-386J

Supply-Post Office

I should like to point out that the five separate rate increases recently announced were all for services which were not paying their way. Under the new rates, there will still be a net loss, but it will be much less.

I have indicated that normal additional services, particularly in regard to letter carrier service, had been slowed down by the government's reduced expenditure program.

I am pleased to tell you that part of the additional revenue from the recent rate increase is being used to provide door-to-door mail delivery on a normal basis which will give this type of service to some 20,000 new homes in the immediate future. Already, since the beginning of October more than

10.000 householders have been granted door-to-door letter carrier delivery service and the others will follow as quickly as arrangements can be completed.

I also intend to give a brand new look to Canadian postage stamps and, in the future, Canadians can look for brighter and more interesting stamps as the department produces three and perhaps four colour stamps by a combination of steel engraving and offset lithography as compared to the customary one or two colour designs. Red will be mostly used to make them more attractive.

We plan to begin a series of coloured stamps showing the various provincial floral emblems. We have under way what I think are attractive stamps on the themes of world peace and Canadian unity, and also stamps to commemorate the Charlottetown and Quebec conferences of 1864 which led to confederation. We have decided, for next year, to issue a special Christmas stamp that should be most appropriate.

The department has in its vaults some

58.000 foreign stamps. We wish to display this magnificent collection for the public. This vast collection is now being catalogued and organized and, we hope, will soon be made available for public inspection both at Ottawa and at other points across the country.

Since becoming Postmaster General I have met with great pleasure every group of postal employees who wanted to meet me. In addition, I have met with the executive officers of all the postal associations. I have also done everything I could to back up the work of the department's standing committee on employee relations. As a proof of my interest in the welfare of the employees, I have succeeded in increasing the percentage of the salary increases granted to postmasters of smaller offices during the recent pay revisions.

Another example of my interest in the welfare of the employees was my decision to give the postmasters of smaller offices an

Supply-Post Office

opportunity to compete for promotion in a wider field, and that, at the request of their association.

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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December 18, 1963

Mr. Denis:

May I ask a question? Will the hon. member mention the particular cases?

Topic:   POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT
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