John Knox BLAIR

BLAIR, John Knox, M.D.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Wellington North (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 19, 1875
Deceased Date
November 11, 1950
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Knox_Blair
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=15d2a1ed-71cc-41ad-a359-69ee5412750f&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
physician, teacher

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Wellington North (Ontario)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Wellington North (Ontario)
March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
LIB
  Wellington North (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 50)


May 27, 1943

Mr. BLAIR:

We have a right to unite our efforts, and tell our friends. I have great admiration and respect for every hon. member

of the house. I hav^ respect for the men I have criticized. But I must say they are imposing upon the committee. This house is not the first court of the land; the first court of the land is back in the country. And back in the country there is being created a spirit of bitter hatred for some Frenchmen, and for some men from Toronto, too-

Topic:   EDITION
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May 27, 1943

Mr. BLAIR:

-because they are holding up the business of the house. All the accusations against the Minister of National Defence are not called for. I have watched him for many years in the house, and I have every admiration for him, nor have I any criticism to make whatsoever. I hope he will be allowed to attend to his duties as Minister of National Defence.

Topic:   EDITION
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May 27, 1943

Mr. BLAIR:

The subject under discussion is pay and allowances. I am very glad the previous speaker said what he did. He has saved me a great deal of trouble, because the very things with which he dealt have been worrying me. Perhaps I would have dealt with them in rasher language, in more unparliamentary terms, so that I greatly appreciate his remarks. I regret very much that the minister has to sit here day after day listening to these continual attacks, when he should be at work in his own department. I can understand the minister's fatigue, and that he is tired out. Yet we keep him here, in the chamber. I wonder if, when these speeches are being given, he could not withdraw, and let some minor official sit here, so that the minister could attend to -his duties. If we want to retard our war effort, then the way for -us to do it, in a sly, deceptive way, is to keep the minister sitting in his seat, and not allow him to attend to his duties as Minister of National Defence.

I do not know how to prevent it, but I do know that if this House of Commons could purchase a mouth gag, or a few things like that, it would be worth while. We need something. I must say that these speeches attacking the Minister of National Defence, and the questions asked, should be withheld as much as possible. And all the trouble is not coming from Quebec, although the biggest -part of it is. Toronto spoke up to me just a moment ago. I wish you would talk to some of your own friends from Toronto, and get them to keep quiet. They are what I would call a nuisance. They are embarrassing the minister, holding up the business of the committee and taking advantage of the rules of procedure.

War Apprupriation-Army

Topic:   EDITION
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March 18, 1943

Mr. BLAIR:

We all believe in it.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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February 4, 1943

Mr. J. K. BLAIR (Wellington North):

Mr. Speaker, first I wish to compliment the government upon the splendid way in which they have handled the problem of price control. During the last war prices were allowed to go to extremes, and it was very difficult to arrive at proper valuations. I must say, however, that at the present time I am receiving many representations from farmers and farmer organizations in my constituency urging that the price of cattle be raised to some extent, but not to any excessively high level. Our farmers bought their cattle on the understanding that the Canadian price would be on a parity with the United States price. They have their cattle, and plenty of food on the farm for those cattle, but the Canadian price is not sufficiently high to guard the farmer against loss. Many of these cattle cost more than 11 cents a pound. It would be satisfactory if the price were raised to 12 or 12J or even 13 cents. Our farmers would then sell a great portion of their cattle.

A report has been spread abroad that there is a scarcity of cattle in this country. I believe that report is false. I know of hundreds of stables which are full of choice cattle. They are not being sold by our farmers because they are not prepared to take a loss. They believe that they have what they consider a promise from this government that they would receive a price equal to the United States price. There is an embargo on Canadian cattle going to the United States, but it was understood that the Canadian price would be maintained on a level with the United States price and our farmers have bought their cattle on that understanding. Naturally to-day they are disappointed at the Canadian price. Many of them have written to me urging that the price be raised, and I think it is only right that I should bring this matter to the attention of the government. If nothing is done, these cattle will be thrown on the market when spring comes, and the market will be flooded with cattle. We should give the farmers some encouragement to produce, particularly because at the close of this war the food supplies which are available among the united nations will be a power which we can use in the peace negotiations. There are many Esaus in the world, and there will be many starving nations which will want food supplies. Consequently it will be realized that food supplies may play a great part in the peace negotiations.

Our farmers are deserving of consideration,' and I think we should be careful not to shut

The Address-Mr. Blair

out our cattle entirely from the United States. It will be remembered that a few years ago Mexico was shipping three times as many cattle to the United States as was Canada. I took the matter up with the then Minister of Trade and Commerce, Mr. Euler, and asked him so to arrange matters that Canada and Mexico would ship cattle into the United States in the ratio of their respective imports from that country. Mr. Euler sent two men to Washington, and within four days he rose in his place in the house and stated that he wished to advise the hon. member for Wellington North that Canada's allocation of cattle to be shipped to the United States market was to be in proportion to our imports from that country. As a result of that agreement we shipped into the United States that year three times as many cattle as we did the year before, and that arrangement continued in effect until the present embargo was imposed.

It is a serious thing, Mr. Speaker, to close any avenue of trade and commerce.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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