Charles Avila WILSON

WILSON, Charles Avila, B.A., LL.B., K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Laval (Quebec)
Birth Date
December 10, 1869
Deceased Date
April 7, 1936
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles-Avila_Wilson
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=145ee724-8129-4bb1-9823-80b4720ad97a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Laval (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Laval (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 81)


August 9, 1917

Mr. C. A. WILSON:

I will rise to a point of order and will discuss the point of order. This is what happened when you Mr. Speaker, were not in the Chair. I rose to ask a question-however, I see the minister agrees that I am in order, and I will proceed.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT.
Subtopic:   NUMBER OF JURORS IN PANEL.
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August 9, 1917

Mr. C. A. WILSON:

And where he

shines.

4330 .

Topic:   P.C. 3060.
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August 9, 1917

Mr. C. A. WILSON:

The number of cases to be tried in a district has nothing to do with the number of jurors. In a rural district, for instance, a panel of 40 will be summoned, and in Montreal and Quebec a panel of 60. By a provision in the law, if the cases are numerous, another panel can .be summoned, and we sometimes see as many .as three or four panels in the same district.

Topic:   P.C. 3060.
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August 9, 1917

Mr. C. A. WILSON:

The case is not similar.

Topic:   P.C. 3060.
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August 9, 1917

Mr. C. A. WILSON:

I understand that

the " stand aside " number would be 48, and more if the presiding judge at the trial, upon special cause shown, so ordered. Those words, " upon special cause shown ", perplex me. When the Crown says, "stand aside", I would not dare, as an attorney for the defence, ask the Crown prosecutor what his reasons for that request were. 'That would not be proper. What reason would be given by the judge? He will have to give the reasons in public why he gives the Crown prosecutor the power and privilege to order a larger number than 48 to stand by. Would he give those reasons? No. The Crown prosecutor may represent to the court that about 50 of the 100 of the new jurors that are called are Liberals, and this is a Liberal case, and the judge may permit the Crown to extend the "stand asides" to 56 or 58. Or, take the reverse case and suppose they are Conservatives, how can

Topic:   P.C. 3060.
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