Martin Brian MULRONEY

MULRONEY, The Right Hon. Martin Brian, P.C., C.C., G.O.Q., B.A., LL.L.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Charlevoix (Quebec)
Birth Date
March 20, 1939
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brian_Mulroney
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1335c5d9-2c4e-4ed4-b8d2-c85f1099e8d8&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, corporate executive, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

August 29, 1983 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Central Nova (Nova Scotia)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (August 29, 1983 - September 16, 1984)
September 4, 1984 - October 1, 1988
PC
  Manicouagan (Quebec)
  • Leader of the Official Opposition (August 29, 1983 - September 16, 1984)
  • Prime Minister (September 17, 1984 - June 24, 1993)
November 21, 1988 - September 8, 1993
PC
  Charlevoix (Quebec)
  • Prime Minister (September 17, 1984 - June 24, 1993)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 1423)


June 16, 1993

Right Hon. Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister):

Madam Speaker, my hon. friend knows that in the past with regard to free trade and again with regard to NAFTA, questions of culture were raised and the answer was no. There were questions on whether we were going to export all our water and the answer was no. There were questions on natural resources. Questions on Canadian blood were raised and the answer was no.

My hon. friend knows the answer to his question. I gave him the answer. He asked whether I am prepared to write to the President of the United States and the President of Mexico. I am so confident of the position I have just given my hon. friend that I am prepared to resign on this question.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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June 16, 1993

Mr. Mulroney:

I have to admit to not only respect and admiration but a great deal of affection for my hon. friend and all members of the House who have served Canada so well. I will think of you often, especially when I am sitting comfortably in my office between 2.15 p.m. and 3 p.m. every afternoon, knowing that another session of brilliant questioning and thoughtful and compelling answers will be beamed out across the nation in both official languages to an eternally grateful nation.

Topic:   HOUSE OF COMMONS PAGES
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES
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June 16, 1993

Mr. Mulroney:

John Crosbie?

Topic:   HOUSE OF COMMONS PAGES
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES
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June 16, 1993

Right Hon. Brian Mulroney (Prime Minister):

Madam Speaker, my hon. friend and I share many things, including the view that racism is of course a profound evil and the bane of the existence of any so-called civilized society. Unfortunately we are a country of 28 million people and we are going to have our share of kooks, nuts and racists. This in no way reflects the great and quite noble traditions of Canadians.

I remember when I came in as Prime Minister one of the things that struck me was the fact that for decades requests had been made for a royal commission of inquiry into the Nazi war crimes and the fact that Nazi war criminals might be living in Canada. I shared the view that this was a horrible thought to consider, and we immediately appointed a royal commission. I think prosecutions ensued.

Another matter came up. I remember my hon. friend's active and constructive participation in the question of racism directed against Japanese Canadians. For 40 years Japanese Canadians had suffered extreme damage. It was a profound racist act by the Government of Canada. This government came in and corrected it with the help

June 16, 1993

Oral Questions

of all members of the opposition. I thank my hon. friend for it.

That is the kind of leadership all political parties tend to follow in Canada. Those two instances were powerful signals to those kooks and nuts in Canada that they were a tiny minority and would be dealt with vigorously and effectively by a vigilant citizenry.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
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June 16, 1993

Mr. Mulroney:

I hope I did not offend my hon. friend, but I want to tell her this. If you are opposed to NAFTA, you are opposed to free trade. Audrey, you know what happened in that election. If you are opposed to NAFTA you are trying to roll back progress. You are trying to take Canada back to the protectionism of the thirties, the forties and the fifties.

We favour a modem, vigorous outgoing approach that will generate new wealth and new jobs for all young Canadians.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   THE ECONOMY
Full View Permalink