Archibald M. CARMICHAEL

CARMICHAEL, Archibald M.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive
Constituency
Kindersley (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
January 4, 1882
Deceased Date
August 30, 1959
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archibald_M._Carmichael
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=12d60483-a079-4161-ac90-f451a1581cfc&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, minister, teacher

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Kindersley (Saskatchewan)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Kindersley (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
PRO
  Kindersley (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
PRO
  Kindersley (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 77 of 78)


April 27, 1922

Mr. CARMICHAEL:

I would like to emphasize the remarks of the previous speaker as to the small vote for public buildings for the province of Saskatchewan. The name Saskatchewan is of Indian origin but the people out there are not all Indians, nor does the land1 consist of desert or Indian reserves either. In line with my hon. friend who preceded me, I maintain that this vote is the smallest appropriation made for any province. The apportionment of public money for Nova Scotia would look to be smaller but if you combine the vote for Nova Scotia of $19,600, the vote of $48,500 for New Brunswick, and the vote of $38,000 for the maritime provinces generally, it will be seen that the average for each of three maritime provinces is over $35,000. Our province of Saskatchewan

Supply-Public Works

is a real large block of land and the population is 200,000 larger than that of either Manitoba or Alberta. Now it seems to be that an injustice has been done the banner province of Canada-so far as wheat producing goes it is the banner province. I would like also to bring to the attention of the minister the fact that in the town in which I have the honour to live the post office is housed in a small rented shack, and I was informed by the postmaster that he is compelled to move, as the Bank of Commerce which owns the building, is going to haul it away out on the prairies in order that risk of Are may be eliminated. The postmaster accordingly will be compelled to move and find other quarters. It seems to me that this young and growing province should have more consideration in the way of public buildings than apparently it is receiving judging from the estimates before us. However I do not advocate following the policy of the hon. members for Toronto, who believe that money should be spent lavishly. I recollect that our national debt is large and that money is needed for other purposes. I simply desire to point out that justice should be done to the prairie provinces because comparing the votes for this purpose with similar votes for the other provinces of the Dominion we are suffering from a glaring injustice.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF PREMIER NORRIS
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April 25, 1922

Mr. CARMICHAEL:

Prior to the last Dominion election a certain newspaper published in this country made the prophecy that the Progressive party might not be the dog that would do the barking at Ottawa for the next three or four years, but would be at least the tail that would wag the dog. It seems to me that the tail is beginning to wag the dog just a little bit away from the old bone of contention back to the real issue before the House in the consideration of these estimates. I desire to ally myself with the motion that has been made across the floor reducing the amount from $1,400,000 to the handsome sum of $300,000. Even $300,000 is a large sum of money for this purpose, when we consider item No. 51, at page 22 of the estimates, which provides for seed, feed and fertilizer control only the sum of $275,000. I was in our western country during the Easter recess and saw some of the conditions as they exist there this spring among the farmers of my own constituency. I found more than one bank closed and the farmers unable to get loans to buy seed. More than one farmer came to me personally and asked if I would finance him to buy seed because he could not be accommodated through the banks. Yet here in our estimates we find only the small sum of $275,000 apportioned by the Parliament of Canada to the business of financing the people for seed for the important industry of agriculture. I submit that agriculture is of far more importance to the Dominion of Canada than the matter of annual drill, which includes pay, subsistence and allowances to officers and men of the active militia during training, as well as transportation and other local expenses. I think that the few thousand men who will profit by this allowance of $300,000, if the amendment carries, are a small body indeed compared with the several hundred thousand men who came from the agricultural lands of this Dominion and showed their worth during the late war.

Topic:   ESQUIMALT AND NANAIMO RAILWAY COMPANY
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April 7, 1922

Mr. CARMICHAEL:

I gather from the information given by the minister that there are twenty-two or twenty-three experimental farms in the Dominion. How many of these are located in each province? And what is the basis for apportioning so many farms to each province?

Topic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS
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April 7, 1922

Mr. CARMICHAEL:

I judge from the

remarks of the minister that there is no particular basis upon which these farms are established; I presume the district that brings the greatest pressure to bear upon him gets the farm. I remind the minister, then, that our district is new, and assure him that we are going to bring a lot of pressure to bear upon him in the near future.

Topic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS
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April 6, 1922

Mr. CARMICHAEL:

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ACKNOWLEDGEMENT BY THE GOVERNOR GENERAL OF THE ADDRESS
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