Nancy KARETAK-LINDELL

KARETAK-LINDELL, Nancy

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Nunavut (Nunavut)
Birth Date
December 10, 1957
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Karetak-Lindell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1176ba24-9323-47d6-aea3-f62dde35d719&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
financial comptroller

Parliamentary Career

June 2, 1997 - October 22, 2000
LIB
  Nunavut (Northwest Territories)
November 27, 2000 - May 23, 2004
LIB
  Nunavut (Nunavut)
  • Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Natural Resources (January 13, 2003 - December 11, 2003)
June 28, 2004 - November 29, 2005
LIB
  Nunavut (Nunavut)
January 23, 2006 - September 7, 2008
LIB
  Nunavut (Nunavut)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 68)


June 12, 2008

Ms. Nancy Karetak-Lindell (Nunavut, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Fisheries persists on giving our valuable turbot quota to southern interests, which by rights belong to Nunavut through adjacency.

Why does the adjacency principle apply to other parts of the country but does not get considered for Nunavut quotas?

Why does he not treat our fishermen with respect? Is it because the government has no real intention of helping the people who live there and only wants the rich resources of Nunavut?

Topic:   Oral Questions
Subtopic:   Fisheries
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June 10, 2008

Ms. Nancy Karetak-Lindell (Nunavut, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, my heart goes out to all the people who were taken away from their families and sent away to residential schools. This I can relate to from personal experience.

Residential school survivors have experienced many things from being torn away from their families at a very young age and being sent to school so far away that they were lucky to see their parents once a year. Many did not go home for years. Imagine the culture shock of being immersed in another language and culture, with different foods and clothing and with some losing their language.

No matter how deeply scarred they are, many Inuit residential school survivors say they that want to be mentioned and acknowledged as Inuit residential school survivors. A generic apology is not enough, as each people suffered uniquely. Inuit should be recognized as such.

Foremost, the apology must be sincere and unconditional for the many injustices, for ruined lives and for the children who never returned home. Then true healing and reconciliation may begin for many.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Aboriginal Affairs
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June 6, 2008

Ms. Nancy Karetak-Lindell (Nunavut, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, today marks the 64th anniversary of D-Day, the beginning of the Allied effort to liberate the European continent from the scourge of Nazi oppression.

I stand in the House keenly aware of the sacrifices that were made by the brave young men of the Canadian Army, Navy and Air Force, aware of the lives that were lost, and aware of the valour that was displayed on that day.

Nobody can question the unparalleled success of our soldiers on that fateful day. In fact, Canadians can remember with pride that our boys pushed farther inland than any other nation, achieving many of the ambitious goals that had been set for them as part of Operation Overlord.

Yet we must never forget the terrible losses that our soldiers suffered. Forty-three airmen and 369 soldiers paid the ultimate price for our freedom on D-Day. It is in their honour and in their memory that I invite all members of the House to join with me in recognizing this anniversary of their final victory over the tyranny of evil.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   D-Day
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May 29, 2008

Ms. Nancy Karetak-Lindell (Nunavut, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, Canada embarrassed itself on the world stage last year when the Conservative government opposed the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Canada was one of only four countries in the world to oppose it when an overwhelming majority of countries, 143, voted in favour. Over 100 legal experts agreed that Canada did not have a legal basis to reject the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

The government's opposition to the UN declaration went against the advice of its own officials. The government is hiding behind bogus arguments to defend its betrayal of Canada's aboriginal peoples.

Canada was once a leader on human rights issues. It is an international embarrassment that we would undermine the declaration at the UN. Now Canada is even blocking attempts to implement a similar document at the Organization of American States.

On this National Day of Action we are demanding that the Conservative government reverse its position and stand up for our rights.

Topic:   Statements By Members
Subtopic:   Aboriginal Affairs
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May 27, 2008

Ms. Nancy Karetak-Lindell (Nunavut, Lib.)

Mr. Speaker, yesterday the Nunavut Legislative Assembly unanimously passed a motion calling upon the Government of Canada to act now and ban the use of the hakapik as a sealing tool in order to protect our traditional seal products market.

The imagine of the hakapik is being used successfully in misinformation campaigns against Canadian seal products even though the hakapik accounts for only 10% of the seals taken each year in southern Canada.

Inuit communities are under threat from this outdated, incorrect and misleading information by the animal rights fundraising industry, which wants European legislators to ban all trade in seal products within the European Union.

Inuit have always hunted seals for food, clothing and fuel, although not with the hakapik. This is a very important part of our culture.

Even if the Europeans permit an Inuit exemption, the entire market will be destroyed, so what help is that? If the Conservative government really wants to stand up--

Topic:   Statements by Members
Subtopic:   Sealing Industry
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