Charles Colquhoun BALLANTYNE

BALLANTYNE, The Hon. Charles Colquhoun, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
Birth Date
August 9, 1867
Deceased Date
October 19, 1950
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Ballantyne
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=0e29d17a-80d6-43a8-89b0-55c3664f17a0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manufacturer

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (October 13, 1917 - July 9, 1920)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (October 13, 1917 - July 9, 1920)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
February 3, 1932 - October 4, 1921
CON
  St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
December 11, 1942 - October 4, 1921
PC
  St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (January 22, 1942 - May 7, 1942)
  • Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (May 7, 1942 - September 11, 1945)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 447 of 452)


April 2, 1918

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

I shall be very glad to give the hon. gentleman the information he asks for. The commission have not yet finished- their sittings, and in the course of a week or two will be going out to British Columbia. As hon. gentlemen know, this is an international commission, the American representatives being Hon. Wm. C. Red-field, Hon. E. C. Sweet, and Dr. H. M. Smith; and the Canadian representatives Chief Justice Hon. J. D. Hazen, Mr. G. J. Desbarats, and Mr. W. A. Found, Superintendent of Canadian Fisheries. Without going into detail, what this commission have accomplished with regard to eastern Canada is simply this: In the past Canadian vessels were not allowed to land or dispose of their catch at American ports, nor were American vessels allowed to land and dispose of their catch at Canadian ports, but arrangements have recently been ar-

18J

rived at whereby this will be possible in future for the fishermen- of both countries. This agreement was readily agreed to by the American representatives, and it is highly appreciated not only by the Government of Canada but by the people as well. In addition to that, in the past we have had a close season for lobster fishing, and during ouf close season, American smacks used to fish for Canadian lobsters outside the three-mile limit; but now an agreement has been reached wheTeby the American Government will not allow American smacks to fish outside the three-mile limit during our close season for lobster fishing. I am sure hon. members will agree that these concessions are of the greatest importance not only to the fishermen of Canada but to the country itself. Of course I cannot foretell what decisions will be arrived at when the commission hold their sittings in British Columbia. There are many important- problems for them to solve, particularly the question of the conservation of salmon.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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April 2, 1918

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

I am not an expert fisherman, but I have taken the best technical advice I could from those on the spot, arid also from expert technical people who have devoted a great deal of time and study to the lobster industry, and I have been informed-and I think credibly informed- that the lobster hatcheries do not produce

within 70 per cent of the small fry Which would be produced if they were allowed to go on in the usual way. I think the hon. gentleman is aware that when the female lobster is caught, it is taken to the canneries, and the eggs are brushed off, then an officer calls for these eggs, and they are put into a jar, and hatched in the hatchery. I am told that in this way there is only thirty per cent production.

If the eggs are allowed to remain on the female lobster in the usual way until the time has arrived when the female extrudes her eggs, there is a one hundred per cent production. We have, therefore, decided not to continue the hatcheries and consequently we can save $30,000 a year.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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April 2, 1918

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

No. The largest item is the $30,000 to be saved by not opening up the lobster hatcheries, and, in addition to that, we are not going to carry on the usual programme adopted by the Government. We are going to curtail, and that is one of the reasons that we have every effort possible to make the handsome reduction shown here of $100,000.

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April 2, 1918

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

I thank the hon. gentleman for bringing the matter to my attention. I shall look into it to-morrow; if this inspector is earning the money he will remain-if not, he will go.

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April 2, 1918

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

The appointments are in the hands of the Civil Service Commission, tout if that body needs any advice -and I assume it will-the inspector of the district in question would toe the man from whom we should seek advice. If we find that he is not giving us the kind of advice that we would expect to get from a business man then we will put another inspector in charge of that district.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
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