Charles Colquhoun BALLANTYNE

BALLANTYNE, The Hon. Charles Colquhoun, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
Birth Date
August 9, 1867
Deceased Date
October 19, 1950
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Ballantyne
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=0e29d17a-80d6-43a8-89b0-55c3664f17a0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
manufacturer

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (October 13, 1917 - July 9, 1920)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (October 13, 1917 - July 9, 1920)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
February 3, 1932 - October 4, 1921
CON
  St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
December 11, 1942 - October 4, 1921
PC
  St. Lawrence--St. George (Quebec)
  • Minister of Marine and Fisheries (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Minister of the Naval Service (July 10, 1920 - December 28, 1921)
  • Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (January 22, 1942 - May 7, 1942)
  • Leader of the Opposition in the Senate (May 7, 1942 - September 11, 1945)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 452)


May 27, 1921

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

I will tell my hon. friend just as soon as my deputy arrives. He has gone upstairs for a moment.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

I shall be very glad to give my hon. friend any information I possibly can. I am glad to note that he has missed the blue uniform of the Royal Canadian navy on the streets. The only reason why he happened to see them in that well-known uniform a year or so ago was because the war was then on. During peace time at headquarters they 'are not permitted to wear their uniforms. The ships on the Pacific coast at present are the Aurora, two torpedo destroyers, the Patricia and the Patriot. The cruiser Aurora was built in 1914, is oil burning, and carries a complement of officers and men numbering 318. The two destroyers are oil burners built in 1916 and carry about 90 each of a personnel. The total number of officers and men on these three ships is something like 600. The college at

Esquimalt is still carried on. Forty-five cadets entered for the last term, and while I do not yet know the results, the reputation that the graduates have had ever since the college was established in 1911 has been a most commendable one. The course is excellent and our young Canadian officers have done well in the British navy, in which we have something like 38. We are going to continue the college on the same footing that has been maintained since 1911. The dockyards at Esquimalt have been closed down for nearly a year. There has not been very much work and we therefore closed them and let all the workmen out except the necessary few to look after the stores, and the watchmen to look after the works. The Halifax dockyards are being operated on very much reduced time and our staff there is necessarily a great deal smaller than it has been. The vote we are asking for of $2,500,000 is for the operation and maintenance of the cruisers and two torpedo destroyers, two submarines, the college and the dockyards at Esquimalt and Halifax. This vote of $2,500,000 is no higher than the amount we spent in pre-war times. While before the war we spent $1,700,000, when we come to estimate the increased cost of oil, coal, wages, provisions, etc., I am happy to say that the cost to the country to-day is not one cent more than it was then, and instead of having an inefficient, obsolete and small navy we have a highly efficient fleet which has made a splendid impression at Halifax and at the Pacific coast.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

The company, at

the time the contract was signed, represented to the Naval Service Department that they particularly wanted the submarines before the bad weather set in. They said that they did not want to take delivery of the Niobe until later. From all the information that I had, they were good financially; I still think the St. John Rolling Mills are perfectly good financially, and we let them have the submarines. Our contract is a good contract in every way. There is no possible chance of the company getting out of it: the only way in which they could get out of it would be if they were in a position to implement the contract and pay for the Niobe. As far as I can learn, their financial standing is perfectly good, and we must see that we get our money.

Topic:   REVISED EDITION. COMMONS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

The Niobe was

sold to the New Brunswick Rolling Mills Limited, after public tenders had been called for, for $135,000.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
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May 27, 1921

Mr. BALLANTYNE:

When they defaulted on their payment, I at once sent an official letter to my colleague the Minister of Justice (Mr. Doherty), enclosing a copy of the contract and asking him to see that the Government got payment or

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
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