William Melville MARTIN

MARTIN, William Melville, Q.C., B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Regina (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
August 23, 1876
Deceased Date
June 22, 1970
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Melville_Martin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=0d105fac-7cfa-4e90-8130-9904481a8b80&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer, teacher

Parliamentary Career

October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  Regina (Saskatchewan)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  Regina (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 119 of 123)


December 16, 1909

Mr. W. M. MARTIN.

If the hon. gentleman is not paying enough attention to hear what I say he will have to search ' Hansard ' to find out. I must congratulate hon. gentlemen on their change of front with respect to the question of immigration. Hon. gentlemen who represent western constituencies on the other side of the House are beginning to vie with one another, to actually fall over one another, in their endeavours to pay compliments to the Galicians and Doukhobors whom, a very few years ago, they criticised so severely in this House. We are getting in this country now an average of nearly 200,000 immigrants or more each year. It is impossible that among this large number there would not be some that we would be better without. We might say that even in our own country there are some people whom we would be better without.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET DEBATE.
Subtopic:   EXPORTS OF SHEEP FROM CANADA.
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December 16, 1909

Mr. W. M. MARTIN.

I did not refer to anybody on the other side of the House.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET DEBATE.
Subtopic:   EXPORTS OF SHEEP FROM CANADA.
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December 16, 1909

Mr. W. M. MARTIN.

I have before me the report of the Department of Trade and Commerce, and I say that the figures I have given are absolutely correct. The figures given by the hon. member for North Toronto do not take into consideration goods that have been placed on the free list, and I say that to make a fair statement of the reduction in the tariff you must take into consideration non-dutiable as well as dutiable goods. On this basis, as I have said, the reduction is almost 3 per cent. This may seem a small reduction, but the amount saved to the people of the country up to and including 1907-I have not the figures for the last two years-was in excess of $50,000,000.

The hon. member for North Toronto also travelled through the west and went over some of the railways in that country. He calls a part of the western country the 'double-track' country'. He says that you can sit at your car window and drop a pea on the track of some competing railway. There are only one or two places that I known of in the western country where there are what may be called parallel railways. Of course, railways may be parallel if one hundred miles apart. But the impression that these hon membes try to convey is that the two railways are not serving different parts of the country. If we consider the country between Winnipeg and Edmonton and take the main lines of the Grand Trunk Pacific and the Canadian Pacific, there is not a place where you can say the railways are parallel. It is true that the two lines converge at Portage la Prairie, but it is necessary that they should converge at competing points. They converge again at Saskatoon. And it is true that for some distance west of Saskatoon they run close together. But there is this fact to be remembered that the Grand Trunk Pacific had completed their survey and commenced construction before the Canadian Pacific Railway got there. West of Edmonton again, the Canadian Northern and the Grand Trunk Pacific run close together. But that is made necessary not only by the conformation of the country but by the fact that they both use the Aellowhead Pass to get through the mountains.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET DEBATE.
Subtopic:   EXPORTS OF SHEEP FROM CANADA.
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December 16, 1909

Mr. W. M. MARTIN.

I do not know that that matters. The Canadian Northern was probably constructed first, but the main point is that they are both going to use the Yellowhead Pass. This brings up the question of transportation in the west. I was bold enough to make an assertion here last session and I was sarcastically commented upon by some of the 53

newspapers for saying that the transportation question was the most important question in the west to-day. Well, I risk another sarcastic reference by repeating the statement that the transportation question is the most important question to be dealt with in the west at the present time. It is true we have got practically three transcontinental railroads today, but we now need branch lines to feed these railways. Last year when I spoke in this House in connection with the loan to the Grand Trunk Pacific railway I said the farmers could not get their grain out of the country. The railways did not appear to be prepared to handle the grain, they had not sufficient cars or they were not capable of handling the large production of wheat and other grains. Owing to the railways having provided better facilities this year and also partially to the fact that the farmers have not marketed so much of their crop there has not been any scarcity of cars in Saskatchewan up to the present.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS-THE BUDGET DEBATE.
Subtopic:   EXPORTS OF SHEEP FROM CANADA.
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December 15, 1909

Mr. W. M. MARTIN (Regina).

Mr. Speaker, I rise to express myself as favourable to the resolution which has been placed on the Notice Paper by the hon. member for West Huron (Mr. Lewis). The first part of the resolution says:

Topic:   RULES OF THE HOUSE.
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