Edward Allan MILLER

MILLER, Edward Allan, B.Sc.

Personal Data

Party
New Democratic Party
Constituency
Nanaimo--Alberni (British Columbia)
Birth Date
February 13, 1942
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Allan_Miller
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=0ccac6ee-dfdf-455d-a321-955696e7b3f1&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
guidance counsellor, teacher

Parliamentary Career

May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
NDP
  Nanaimo--Alberni (British Columbia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
NDP
  Nanaimo--Alberni (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 70)


June 29, 1984

Mr. Ted Miller (Nanaimo-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, l have the honour to present a petition on behalf of the residents of Yellow Point on Vancouver Island and other British Columbia citizens interested in marine environment. In addressing their petition to several Ministers, both in Ottawa and in Victoria, and to the House of Commons, they express their concern

about the inadequate protection provided to coastal communities and to the environment from bulk carriers of coal, oil, chemicals and other commodities carried along Canada's coast.

By citing a specific case which occurred on February 5, 1984, the residents demonstrate the virtual impossibility of obtaining a conviction for pollution and call for an inquiry to find practical, enforceable means of protecting the fragile and recreationally valuable waters and shores of Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands from the risk of further damage by bulk carriers.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   PETITIONS
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June 28, 1984

Mr. Ted Miller (Nanaimo-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, the failure of Canada's private pension system is obvious from the growing dependence of elderly Canadians on the Canada Pension Plan, the Guaranteed Income Supplement, and additional tax incentives proposed in the February Budget to support private savings.

Over 50 per cent of elderly Canadians are dependent on the Guaranteed Income Supplement and provincial top-ups to support CPP and private plans. Only 54 per cent of working men and 33 per cent of working women have any private pension coverage, leaving the rest dependent on the public pension system for income replacement in retirement. They face a future of poverty unless the public system is designed for adequacy of retirement income. It is presently designed to be inadequate so private plans can flourish.

The Liberal and Conservative response to the inability and unwillingness of private employers to provide pension saving opportunities is to increase tax incentives to private plan holders and virtually ignore coverage for low-income earners by rejecting mandatory pension coverage or increasing CPP benefits and contributions.

To address pension coverage and adequacy for all Canadian workers and their families seriously, we should be striving to reduce the welfare aspect of the public system by increasing the universal Old Age Security to its former prominence, increasing CPP benefits, and adapting credit splitting so that all pensioners may enjoy their own pensions and ensure retirement with security and comfort.

Topic:   PENSIONS
Subtopic:   CALL FOR INCREASE IN PUBLIC SYSTEM BENEFITS
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June 26, 1984

Mr. Ted Miller (Nanaimo-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, this morning I received a telegram from the Mayor of Ucluelet, a community in my riding which is dependent upon the fishing industry and tourism. He asked me, on behalf of the community, to do everything I can to stop the proposed Pacific salmon fisheries legislation from passing before his community and others have an opportunity to assess the impact. It is clear to Mayor Larson, and it is clear to me, that the impact will be devastating. The proposals outlined in the draft legislation to restructure the Pacific fishery would wreak havoc on the West Coast. Coastal communities sense this, and so do fishermen. Yesterday some 1,500 fishermen tied up their boats in Port Alberni as a demonstration against the Government's proposals and its inability to manage the West Coast fishery.

Fishermen, coastal communities, native leaders, and all others in B.C. who are concerned about the future of our salmon stocks, are angry that the Government's proposals do not address in any substantial way any measures to increase salmon stocks. This proposed legislation does little more than ensure the financial ruin of fishermen.

If the Government continues with its present approach, it will lead not only to the gutting of the commercial fleet and the loss of thousands of jobs, but it will also lead to the eventual closure of the sports fishery and have serious impact

June 26, 1984

on the native food fishery. Many coastal communities may not be able to survive. If the Government is serious about conservation and restoration of our salmon stocks, it should introduce buy-back legislation which is acceptable to most, and allow the rest of its proposals adequate scrutiny, as is being demanded.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   OPPOSITION TO PROPOSED PACIFIC FISHERY LEGISLATION
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June 20, 1984

Mr. Ted Miller (Nanaimo-Alberni):

Mr. Speaker, in the absence of the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans who, I would have thought, would be present today after having draft legislation tabled on Monday, I address my question to the Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans. On Monday the Parliamentary Secretary did table draft legislation on the restructuring of the Pacific fisheries at the same time as the Minister was holding a press conference in Vancouver, outlining a direction for the Pacific fisheries which is much different from the one taken by the legislation that was introduced in the House.

In view of the importance of the fishery to British Columbia fishermen and British Columbia residents in general, and in view of the complexity of this Bill, I would like to ask the Parliamentary Secretary if the Minister and the Government are really serious about introducing legislation now to be dealt with in the last two weeks of the Session, considering how all-encompassing that legislation is to be. Is the Government serious about attacking the problems that have been lingering for the last 21 months since the Pearse report was received?

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FISHERIES
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June 20, 1984

Mr. Miller:

Mr. Speaker, I think the answer of the Parliamentary Secretary reflects the concern of the Liberal Party for the British Columbia fishing industry and for those communities dependent upon it. I see the Minister has just arrived.

Topic:   ORAL QUESTION PERIOD
Subtopic:   FISHERIES
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