Arthur SAUVÉ

SAUVÉ, The Hon. Arthur, P.C.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Laval--Two Mountains (Quebec)
Birth Date
October 1, 1874
Deceased Date
February 6, 1944
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_Sauvé
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=0b0b131b-c8ce-4b63-afe9-95790f718095&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
journalist

Parliamentary Career

July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Laval--Two Mountains (Quebec)
  • Postmaster General (August 7, 1930 - August 13, 1935)
August 25, 1930 - August 14, 1935
CON
  Laval--Two Mountains (Quebec)
  • Postmaster General (August 7, 1930 - August 13, 1935)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 292 of 292)


March 26, 1931

Mr. SAUVE (Translation):

That is why

you consent to do yours in the opposition. The country will decide, I hope, that my hon. friend has not weighty arguments enough to say that it is him who will decide of the fate of Canada's future.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 26, 1931

Mr. SAUVE (Translation):

Puns are cheap substitutes for arguments, and I admit my hon. friend's superiority on this score.. Our friends on the left, sir, rebuke tne government for not having brought down, since its recent advent to power, all the measures which could relieve the crisis that they themselves denied a few months ago.

I do them no wrong in saying-

An hon. MEMBER (Translation): Oh,

no! We never denied it.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 26, 1931

Mr. SAUVE (Translation):

Hon. gentlemen seemingly look upon me as if I were born yesterday, if I had never read the newspapers, or listened to the speeches of my hon. friends on the other side. In fact, what have we heard from our opponents' side? A kind of debate on the budget which seemed to have been prepared to fan certain prejudices instead of offering useful suggestions, timely recommendations and expressing in conjunction with the address, the guiding principles which should guide the parties in a session where national problems are set up and must be discussed in a special manner, and in the best of spirit. They have prepared speeches on the budget

The Address-Mr. Sauve

-this does not happen in our Quebec legislature-before even hearing the budget speech by the Minister of Finance, and knowing the whole fiscal policy that the government intends to introduce for the welfare of the country. They have impeached in every way, all possible tone and with the oddest manner, this government already mischievous though still in its infancy and which, nevertheless, the very day following its advent, called an emergency session to relieve those who were suffering, to alleviate as much as possible under the circumstances, unemployment and the sufferings of the people, to protect the Canadian farmer against dumping which was ruining him; to negotiate treaties with a view of better protecting farm products, the Canadian producer on the whole, and to safeguard also our manufacturers by stopping a disastrous competition or by prohibting certain ruinous imports which were favoured by the Dunning tariff.

Some hon. MEMBERS (Translation): Oh, oh.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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March 26, 1931

Mr. SAUVE (Translation):

I do not

mind such protests coming from the other side of the house. Immediately following the emergency session, the leader of the government crossed over to England and France with the idea of finding some relief for the western farmer and negotiate exchanges in order to secure a market more advantageous for his wheat. Since then he has afforded protection both to the east and west of Canada by favouring the national industries, especially those of coal and pulp against the dangerous competition of Russia. This is, sir, what the government has done within the last few months. I ask why should the hon. members on your left, sir, be so harsh towards this government and demand from them results only to be expected from an administration long in power.

At the Imperial conference, the Prime Minister made a proposal which was of interest to the empire, although he considered Canada's interests first-that is probably what offended our opponents-a proposal which was supported, strange to say, by all the representatives of the dominions. To hear the opposition, one would think that the Prime Minister sold his country and proved a traitor in making such a proposal. Evidently this proposal could not immediately be accepted by the British government, especially by that of Mr. Ramsay MacDonald. It needed to be deeply studied. And there lies the reason for calling another conference this year. It is our hope, and we must all hope that the delegates of the Imperial government will

represent at this conference the wish and interests of the people of England. Why, in the course of this session, should the parties not seek to come to an understanding in order to protect Canada and prepare the country to reap the greatest benefit possible from this conference? Should not the country's interests, especially in these days of depression, pass before party interests? Each party would have to its credit the proposals which it would have had adopted by the house for the welfare of Canada.

Our opponents go so far as to criticize the government's policy with reference to Russia, and the right hon. leader of the opposition will allow me to express, with all due respect, the astonishment I felt, when, the other day,

I saw him give vent to his feelings and allow his friends to do so, with reference to the decision taken by the Prime Minister and the government in connection with Russia. The government does not intend to deprive Canada of markets necessary for^ the sale of her products. If we want to utilize the resources of the country, we must-and we have often stated it-we must have markets abroad. One must be blind not to see that the world no longer turns towards militarism for purposes of conquest, but is intent on increasing production and economic expansion. With the mass producing machinery that science furnishes the world, each country endeavours to secure the world's markets, but first to protect its own. One must not lose sight that we are going through an era of reconstruction and that the government's policy must help in bringing about the equilibrium needed after the great war which upset the world. At the same time this country adopted a high standard of living based on scientific principles, and rendered more exacting by the example of our wealthy neighbours. Thus it was that, while economic conditions were becoming harder, our producers had to put up with the competition on the home markets, of countries having hundreds of millions of men, of simple habits, and able owing to favourable climatic conditions, of producing on terms which defied all competition on our part. One must bear in mind, sir, that our local truck farming industry has been disorganized through the extension of motor car transportation.

As to Russia, hon. members of both sides of the house know that it is passing through a revolution, and it is carrying on in our country a dangerous propaganda, we were so warned by the most respected authorities in this country, not only as regards the economic viewpoint but especially the false theories

The Address-Mr. Lapointe

which it seeks to spread among the humble workers and the younger generation. That is an important point to consider when we discuss the new policy of the government with reference to Russia.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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