Herbert Brown AMES

AMES, Sir Herbert Brown, LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Unionist
Constituency
St. Antoine (Quebec)
Birth Date
June 27, 1863
Deceased Date
March 30, 1954
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Ames
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=072c16bb-5aeb-404d-8b40-c80115fe3038&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, businessman

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  St. Antoine (Quebec)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  St. Antoine (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  St. Antoine (Quebec)
December 17, 1917 - February 14, 1921
UNION
  St. Antoine (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 376)


June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

I cannot tell you, because whatever happened there has happened since I returned to Canada.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

The League of

Nations is not setting up the old wars. The League of Nations has to accept the world, when peace is made, and deal with it from then onwards. That brings up this very important difference between the Supreme Council and the League of Nations. We are often asked why the Supreme Council does not bring its duties to an end and make room for the League of Nations. That arises from a misconception of the difference ,between the two bodies. The Supreme Council differs, both in its composition, and in the work that it does, from the League of Nations. The Supreme Council will continue until the Treaties have all been drawn up and accepted, and until the force to cause them to be accepted has been used, if necessary. When the world is at peace it is not expected that there will be very much left for the Supreme Council to do. On the other hand the League of Nations is not merely a small sub-committee of the victorious powers. The League of Nations includes thirteen neutral powers; its powers are curative and constructive and it takes hold where the Supreme Council lets go.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

Mr. Waugh, who is on the Saar Valley Basin Governing Commission; Doctor Riddell, who, I understand, came from the Ontario Government, and who occupies a position in the Labour Office in connection with the study of unemployment; there are one or two younger men in subordinate positions and one young lady. Mr. Martel went over, I understand, as the Vice-President of Trades and Labour Council of Montreal. Then to the various committees that are sitting from time to time we send Canadian representatives. At the present moment Mr. Gundy is over there assisting in the organization of the Financial Conference. He came somewhat ahead of time owing to the conference having been postponed, and as he was likely to be in England some time he offered to help the committee, and is doing so I understand.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

I do not think

Greece has been asked to become the mandatory; at least it had not up to the time when I left London.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

With respect to Armenia, the first 'Step that is to be taken is to delimit its boundaries. At the present time "Armenia" is a term which spreads over a larger or smaller portion of the map. President Wilson has been asked by the League of Nations to delimit Armenia. That, as I say, is the first step. It still remains to the Supreme Council after these limits are suggested to determine whether they are satisfactory and to take the necessary steps to crystallize that area into a state. Then it becomes necessary to get a mandatory appointed. It has already been suggested that the United States should accept the mandate. The United States, I understand-, has 'declined to do so and therefore it comes back to the Supreme Council to determine what to do with Armenia. The Supreme Council in turn is suggesting to the League of Nations that it should find a mandatory. It is possible that the League of Nations may decide to guarantee a loan of the necessary funds to put Armenia on a sound financial basis and may also guarantee the necessary force to be raised among the powers for its defence, in which case it may be possible to secure some small state that can take over the administration with a feeling that the whole expense will not fall upon them and that they will' not be compelled to maintain a large army in Armenia for its protection.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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