Herbert Brown AMES

AMES, Sir Herbert Brown, LL.D.

Personal Data

Party
Unionist
Constituency
St. Antoine (Quebec)
Birth Date
June 27, 1863
Deceased Date
March 30, 1954
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Ames
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=072c16bb-5aeb-404d-8b40-c80115fe3038&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
author, businessman

Parliamentary Career

November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
CON
  St. Antoine (Quebec)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
CON
  St. Antoine (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
CON
  St. Antoine (Quebec)
December 17, 1917 - February 14, 1921
UNION
  St. Antoine (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 376)


June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

The sessions of

the Council of the League of Nations usually take place about a month apart. From four to eight days are devoted to a session. Generally they sit perhaps one or two days in secret session, and then they hold a public session. The votes are always taken at a public session. At this session the rapporteur presents the resolution that has been agreed upon and makes a statement in support of it. Usually the public sessions are social functions, there being generally present several ambassadors and a certain

number of the public-in fact, any one who desires to be present can attend so far as the limited space will allow. Generally fifty or sixty newspaper men are present to report all the details that are given. The private meetings are of a more or less informal character, and they are considered to be absolutely necessary in order that there may be the utmost freedom of discussion among the representatives. I have been able to attend several private meetings when I presented my budget, or where there has been discussion on some matter that required financing, and I have been struck, as I said in my speech, with the determination to always artive at a unanimous agreement. I have seen a question brought up that developed a very considerable difference of opinion, I have seen it discussed for an hour and then withdrawn, the Chairman saying, "Gentlemen, you have had an opportunity of hearing all the different points of view. We will take this question up again the day after tomorrow." When the question came up again it would be considerably amended, and in its amended form it would show evidence of an attempt to meet the different points of view. Perhaps that question would come up at three or four successive meetings until finally it was presented in such shape that it would be passed unanimously, and then action wcjuld follow.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

ll think I can only tell the hon. member that that is all set forth in the Treaty. A commission of five members to administer the Saar Basin was appointed at the first and second meetings of the Council of the League of Nations. For the time being they have very wide powers in the Saar Basin. They administer practically all the affairs of that district; the civil service, railways, telephones and telegraphs are all under their control. It is their duty to see that the stipulations in the Treaty with respect to the coal and the proportion of it which will reach France

shall be strictly adhered to. Under their guidance I think they are adhered to.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

I am afraid that in this instance I can only quote what the hon. member has already quoted. As we understand it, every treaty entered into after the signing of the pact by any member of the League with a non-member, or by members of the League with each other, must be registered with a department that is part of the Secretariat of the League. That department examines the Treaty, and if it contains anything contrary to the spirit or the letter of the Covenant, the treaty is not accepted and the nation is asked to revise it. It is hoped and expected that in that way open diplomacy will be encouraged, and that no engagement will be made that might involve nations in war in support of one another. The department has only just been set up. As I understand it, every nation is bound to register its treaty, and any nation that refused would by that very act render itself no longer a member of the League.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

I cannot tell you, because whatever happened there has happened since I returned to Canada.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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June 22, 1920

Sir HERBERT AMES:

The League of

Nations is not setting up the old wars. The League of Nations has to accept the world, when peace is made, and deal with it from then onwards. That brings up this very important difference between the Supreme Council and the League of Nations. We are often asked why the Supreme Council does not bring its duties to an end and make room for the League of Nations. That arises from a misconception of the difference ,between the two bodies. The Supreme Council differs, both in its composition, and in the work that it does, from the League of Nations. The Supreme Council will continue until the Treaties have all been drawn up and accepted, and until the force to cause them to be accepted has been used, if necessary. When the world is at peace it is not expected that there will be very much left for the Supreme Council to do. On the other hand the League of Nations is not merely a small sub-committee of the victorious powers. The League of Nations includes thirteen neutral powers; its powers are curative and constructive and it takes hold where the Supreme Council lets go.

Topic:   COURT OF INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE
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