William Findlay MACLEAN

MACLEAN, William Findlay, B.A.

Personal Data

Party
Independent Conservative
Constituency
York South (Ontario)
Birth Date
August 10, 1854
Deceased Date
December 7, 1929
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Findlay_Maclean
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=06cf61a5-7c95-4155-ab94-d0d4156924b9&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, gentleman, journalist

Parliamentary Career

May 11, 1892 - April 24, 1896
CON
  York East (Ontario)
June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
CON
  York East (Ontario)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
IND
  York East (Ontario)
November 3, 1904 - September 17, 1908
IND
  York South (Ontario)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
IND
  York South (Ontario)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
IND
  York South (Ontario)
December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  York South (Ontario)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
IND
  York South (Ontario)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
IND
  York South (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 918 of 920)


February 15, 1901

Mr. MACLEAN.

Before we adjourn, 1 would like to ask the Minister of Finance (Hon. Mr. Fielding), whether it is his intention to move the House into Committee of Supply to-morrow ?

The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W.

S. Fielding). Some hon. members requested, and I thought it reasonable, that we should not proceed with supply until the Auditor General's Report was placed on the table. On the assumption that that report would be presented on Friday, I said that on that day we would proceed with supply.

I still anticipate that we shall have the report to-morrow. And if it is likely that some matter is to be brought up for discussion on going into supply, we might proceed. If the report be laid on the table after the House opens, perhaps hon. members would not be willing to proceed with business in Committee of Supply. But, as it seems that any discussion might be proceeded with, I would say ' yes ' to the hon. gentleman's (Mr. Maclean's) question.

Topic:   ADJOURNMENT-BUSINESS OP THE HOUSE.
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February 12, 1901

Mr. MACLEAN.

Even under your suggestion, Mr. Speaker, I can still raise the question, because it is a question of the most urgent importance to the people of Canada. I desire to bring before this House, and before the country, the great fact transpiring in the United States to-day as to the control of railways. The railway mileage of that country is now passing into the hands of a most powerful syndicate. This syndicate controls most of the railways of the United States, and there is a dread that within two or three weeks there will not be one line of railway in the neighbouring republic which will not be controlled by Mr. Rockefeller, Mr. Vanderbilt, Mr. Harri-man, Mr. Hill-whose name we hear a great deal of in Canada-and some others. These men have under their power now over $2,000,000,000 of railway capital, and not only that, but these same men control the banking institutions, they control the coal fields, they control the Standard Oil Company, and only last week they got control of the entire iron production of the United States. Last night there was a statement- and here is wheft the question comes home to Canada-in the Montreal Star

Topic:   THE RAILWAY QUESTION.
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February 12, 1901

Mr. MACLEAN.

Perhaps the statement is reported as coming from a friend of hon. gentleman opposite. That statement is this :

It would not be very difficult for the powerful financial interests which Mr. Hill represents to secure a majority of the common stock of the great Canadian Pacific Railway.

Now, the point that I want to bring before the people of Canada and this House is this, that these men, who have obtained control of the railways of the United States, are in a position to-day to capture' the control of both the Grand Trunk Railway and the Canadian Pacific Railway. I can go further : I believe that tracers are out to-day after the stock of these two railways, in order that Messrs. Morgan, Rockefeller, and the men associated with them may, if they think it necessary, get the control of these two Canadian roads ; and I call the attention of the people of this country to this fact, that less than $50,000,000 put on the stock market to-day will secure the control of the

Canadian Pacific Railway. Did this country put all the money which it has put into the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Grand Trunk Railway in order to build railroads which might pass any day from the control of this country to the control of the United States ? What do we see happening at this moment ? These Canadian railroads, in connection with which the people of this country have spent so much money under reputed Canadian or English management, are to-day a menace to Canada. The Canadian Pacific Railway and the Grand Trunk Railway have announced that they intend to shape their policies to build up American cities, if necessary, at the expense of Cana,-dian cities. There is the great question before the people of this country. We were discussing platitudes yesterday in this House, but here is a definite question. The Grand Trunk to-day is antagonizing the city of Montreal, and I believe the Canadian Pacific is antagonizing the city of St. John. These two railroads tell the people of Canada, openly and above board, that they have no consideration for Canadian interests, but will, if it is in their own interests, direct their traffic to the United States. If that is the case to-day, how much worse will it be when Messrs. Morgan and Rockefeller and their associates go on the stock market and secure control of the Grand Trunk and the Canadian Pacific Railway ? I am not dealing in a generality, but am speaking of something that might happen to-morrow. My hon. friend from West Toronto (Mr. Osier) occupies a seat on the board of directors of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and he and Mr. Shaughnessy might attend a board meeting to-morrow and have an intimation made to them that the Canadian Pacific Railway had passed from the control of Canadians to the control of these gentlemen in New York.

Topic:   THE RAILWAY QUESTION.
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February 12, 1901

Mr. MACLEAN.

Topic:   THE RAILWAY QUESTION.
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February 12, 1901

Mr. MACLEAN.

I will move the adjournment of the House, and to that motion I propose to speak.

Topic:   THE RAILWAY QUESTION.
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