Milton Neil CAMPBELL

CAMPBELL, Milton Neil

Personal Data

Party
Progressive
Constituency
Mackenzie (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
January 21, 1881
Deceased Date
November 11, 1965
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milton_Neil_Campbell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=06b3ede1-7cd7-46e9-87f5-23c426b95e96&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer, station agent, telegrapher

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Mackenzie (Saskatchewan)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Mackenzie (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
PRO
  Mackenzie (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
PRO
  Mackenzie (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 3 of 327)


June 4, 1935

Mr. CAMSEBELL:

'Can any farmer now grow tobacco under the board without a licence?

Topic:   GRANTING OF INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
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June 4, 1935

Mr. CAMPBELL:

What does the marketing board do?

Topic:   GRANTING OF INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
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May 28, 1935

Mr. CAMPBELL:

There is only one

standard?

Topic:   WEIGHTS AND MEASURES ACT
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May 27, 1935

Mr. CAMPBELL:

This company has been paying about $40,000 annually in municipal taxes, in addition to provincial and federal

taxes. At the present time in the city of Kingston there are about 2,500 people on relief, the majority of whom are former employees and the families of employees of this company, and are permanent residents.

I should like to point out something further. Some hon. members have voiced the opinion that probably the car shops could build this equipment as well as it could be built by some of the private companies. This company has been in business for a long time; I am not sure when it was started. They have specialized in the manufacture of locomotives; their designers have kept abreast of the times, and to-day they are prepared to make any of the more advanced equipment used not only in this country but also on some of the United States lines. After their locomotive business was cut off in 1930 they tried to branch out in other lines; I remember that they interviewed me, as a mine manager, in connection with the manufacture of mining machinery. They opened an office in Toronto, sent salesmen through northern Ontario and did their best, but even with the prosperity that the mining industry has enjoyed they have been able to secure only about $150,000 worth of business annually, and to employ only some eighty men who are paid about $116,000 annually.

No doubt much of the equipment and power at present used by the railways is not as fast as it might me; probably much of this power should be renovated and made faster in order to give better service throughout the dominion. I would respectfully ask the minister to' pass on the suggestion to the railway companies that the equipment companies be given a fair share of this work. I think the railway shops are going to benefit to a large extent, particularly since only twenty locomotives are to be purchased, and I think as much business as possible should be given these equipment companies. Any work given the Canadian Locomotive Works of Kingston will benefit the people of that city, the labourers who have been waiting for the last three years for something to do, and the farmers and gardeners throughout the district who depend upon the workingmen for a market for their products, and it will help relieve this one city and two townships surrounding it at least of a large part of the cost of relief.

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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May 27, 1935

Mr. CAMPBELL:

A few minutes ago I asked the minister as to the number of locomotives that were going to be bought under this bill, and he replied, about twenty. I point out that this probably means an expenditure of only one and a: quarter to one and a half millions out of this total of $15,000,000. It is further shown that only about $4,000,000 will be spent in repairs; therefore about $10,000,000 will go to the car manufacturers Which seems too large a proportion. I take it that the railway companies feel that twenty locomotives are all they need, so that I am not going to make any special plea for any locomotive manufacturing company. But I want to add a few words, not in defence of any private corn-pay, but to show that some of the utterances of some of my friends to the left on this side are a little severe as to where this money would go. I feel that any money spent under this bill would benefit the unemployed and the farmers and business men surrounding any city in Which any of these factories are located. I have asked several manufacturing concerns in Kingston for their payroll and their production during the years since 1920, and I have before me a table made up by myself from the data received from the Canadian Locomotive Works. I want to be brief, because the hour is getting late, but the table shows that on the average the company have employed 501 men yearly since 1920 and have paid these men $575,833.34 annually, or about $1,150 per man. They have built 238 locomotives, costing $15,353,000, or an average of 21-6 per year. The statement was made tonight that of the money spent for locomotives two-thirds would go in material and one-third in labour. It will be noted that in this case of $15,000,000 spent on locomotives over $7,000,000 went in wages. I believe in this plant wages are fairly high; I can assure my hon. friends to the left that if the Canadian Locomotive Works in Kingston is given some business probably the wages paid will be a little higher than those in some other shops.

Mr. MaoINNIS: Are the men organized?

Topic:   PUBLIC WORKS PROGRAM
Subtopic:   WORKS, 'UNDERTAKINGS AND GUARANTEE OP RAILWAY EQUIPMENT SECURITIES TO CREATE EMPLOYMENT
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