Charles Edward BOTHWELL

BOTHWELL, Charles Edward, K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
May 26, 1882
Deceased Date
August 28, 1967
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Edward_Bothwell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=05ccb288-83b1-4501-8392-1c0eec567fc0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 126 of 128)


May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

If the Maritime provinces were placed in the same position as western Canada in connection with their shipments, I would be quite willing to concede them the same freight rates. I believe, however, that there is possibly a considerable difference, so far as shipments are concerned, between the Maritimes and western Canada. I think it would be the duty of this commission to inquire into this very matter.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 3, 1926

Mr. C. E. BOTHWELL (Swift Current) :

Mr. Speaker, after listening to the various speeches on the budget it would almost appear that there was nothing further to be said, but every hon. member seems to be able to rarse something new. I intend for a few minutes to speak in the hope that I may be able to disabuse the minds of some hon. gentlemen of the wrong impressions that have been conveyed to them.

Let me say, though, that I have no doubt hon. members on both sides of the House are anxious only to assist in legislation that will be in the interests of Canada as a whole. We cannot all see things alike, and we are all prone to take a different view of the same set of facts. But we do hope that a thorough discussion of any subject may enable us to arrive at a conclusion that will give us a proper solution of our difficulties. We are somewhat prone to stress the importance of our own constituency or our own province, but I think we all realize that no matter what part of Canada we come from we all belong to this great Dominion and must assist m legislation which is in the interests of the country as a whole.

It must be a matter of congratulation to the Minister of Finance (Mr. Robb)-indeed, to everyone-to see that we are at last emerging to some degree from the clouds of debt with which we have been surrounded. We know the Great war entailed a tremendous expense, and that we had to assume tremendous obligations after the war during the period of reconstruction. An enormous debt was then piled up, and it is now our duty to see that debt liquidated. Our favourable position, as announced by the Minister of Finance in his budget address, is to no small extent resultant from the bounteous crops with which we have been favoured for the past two years, but our bounteous harvests are not sufficient without other means by which use can be made of them. The Minister of Finance was able to announce that Canada's favourable financial position is due in part to the trade treaties into which Canada has entered. Those treaties, together with the wonderful harvests, have enabled us to bring forward the budget which was presented the other day.

Since this session opened I have at times been alarmed by the statements made from opposition benches as to the dire straits in which Canada found itself. During the early days of the session particularly, we were almost convinced that we were on the verge of bankruptcy; from what various hon. members opposite said we might almost have thought our own conclusions wrong. We had been led to believe that Canada was in a fairly prosperous position, judging from newspaper reports, statements of financial institutions, market reports of various kinds and agricultural conditions generally. Imagine then, how we looked on the situation when we heard what hon. members had to say in this House. We were also surprised to learn, coming from a province which has been developing its dairy industry, that the dairy and poultry industries were being destroyed by the Australian treaty; we could scarcely believe it. I believe that suggestion has been dissipated by the speeches since made in this House, and I do not intend to deal with that question. We were also surprised to learn, from the speeches of hon. members opposite, that there was no legislative programme in favour of the farmers of Canada; now we hear that the legislative programme is all in favour of the farmers of western Canada.

The Speech from the Throne held out hopes of a legislative programme in the in terests of Canada from shore to shore. It is true that Maritime conditions were such as to make it a difficult matter for any government to bring down legislation which would satisfy the people of the Maritimes. I have listene 1

The Budget-Mr. Bothwell

to the speeches in this House dealing with Maritime rights, and I must confess that I do not yet know definitely just what Maritime rights are, nor do I know what legislation the Maritime righters require in order to have their claims satisfied. We are told of promises made when the Maritime provinces entered confederation; those promises, . so far as I know, have been fulfilled. Then we are told of understandings reached between various parts of Canada at that time, and judging from some of the speeches there were some such understandings. If it is possible for the people of Canada to carry out not only those promises but the understandings as well, that should be done, but I believe we will know '' at those understandings and rights are **' ugii the commission appointed to inquire into this question. Surely that commission can bring recommendations to this House which will result in legislation to relieve, to some extent at all events, the people of the Maritimes.

It is claimed that immediate steps should be taken to encourage and foster the coal industry in the Maritimes. We expect the commission to go into that question and make recommendations, but I do not know whether the claims made for the Maritimes would be permanent solution of those difficulties. I hardly know whether sufficient stress has been placed on the condition of the coal industry, not only in the Maritimes but throughout the world.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

No, I have not omitted it.

The Budget-Mr. Bothwell

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

In addition to the eoial industry there is the iron and steel industry in the Maritime provinces, and in this connection I have been much interested in reading the publication known as the Besco Bulletin. I have endeavoured by a study of that publication to find out, to some extent, what the trouble is in the Maritimes. I find from the issue of April 24th that they have four serious disappointments in the budget. They are as follows:

No. 1. Failure to adjust the specific duties on the basic forms of iron and steed so as to bring their ad valorem effect up to the general level of duties on other matenials.

No. 2. Failure to correct the mistake made last year when the duty on bituminous coal was Lowered three cents instead of being raised, and failure to make anthracite screenings dutiable at the same rate as soft coal with which it competes.

No. 3. Failure 'to take up the matter of dealing effectively with the importation of materials produced in countries whose currency is greatly depreciated, which was dropped in a moment of weakness last session, and which is now of greater urgency than it was a year ago.

No. 4. Persistent adherence to the pernicious policy of encouraging the [DOT]importation of finished goods by lowering the duties, and of partly finished materials by refunding the duties specified in the customs tariff.

"Disappointment No. 2," dealing with the duty on bituminous coal, has to do with the very question which was raised by my hon. friend optposite a short time ago. That is one of the "disappointments", apparently, in so far as Besco is concerned, that we hope to have remedied through the commission on Maritime rights.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Full View Permalink

May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

If my information is correct, the Board of Railway Commissioners are studying the question of freight rates. That will be a matter, as I understand it, of finding out whether the rates should be lowered or increased. That is the purpose so far as the railways are concerned. The other commission appointed to inquire into Maritime rights will be supposed to bring in some recommendation that will provide a solution of the difficulties in the Maritimes.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Full View Permalink