Charles Edward BOTHWELL

BOTHWELL, Charles Edward, K.C.

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
Birth Date
May 26, 1882
Deceased Date
August 28, 1967
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Edward_Bothwell
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=05ccb288-83b1-4501-8392-1c0eec567fc0&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Swift Current (Saskatchewan)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 125 of 128)


May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

I am coming to that.

Those figures Show that the cost of manufacturing in the Ford plant at Ford, Ontario, last year amounted to $33,951,844. He says that 47 per cent is exported. The sales amount to $25,714,166. The value of his product would be approximately $48,517,294, showing a surplus 'there of $14,565,450. How much of that goes in paying commissions and one thing or another I do not know, but from their own book there is apparently that amount of profit on an investment of $31,275,530.

The hon. member for Assiniboia read an interview with Henry Ford in connection with this matter. There is a little more of that conversation that I want to put on record. The interviewer continues:

"Mr. Ford/' I began-, "you have -made two admissions that are very interesting. I wonder if you really wish them to be published?"

The Budget-Mr. Bothwell

"You may write anything I have said," he answered. W'hat are the things I've said?"

"You've admitted that tariff protection encourages indolence in manufacturing and that tariff reduction must produce greater efficiency and economy in your Canadian plant?" "That is true " he said. "What's the other?" _

"You've admitted that Ford cars have been getting a higher price than necessary in Canada." "As part of the general tariff situation in Canada-Yes. It

works that way with every commodity and under every tariff. Free trade and free competition are the only healthy conditions," he repeated.

"I would like to ask you about another point which disturbs us in Canada." "Go ahead," said Mr. Ford.

"There is some belief that tariff reduction may mean withdrawal of American branches in Canada and that all this business will now be placed in United States factories." "I don't know anything about the other fellows," said Mr. Ford briskly. "I only know about our business. It is not that way with us.

How Canadian Company Started "Did you establish your plant in Canada because of the tariff?" "No. I didn't establish it at all. It happened this way. Mr. McGregor (referring to the late vice-.president and general manager of the Ford Company of Canada) was running a buggy works over at Windsor. He came across the river to me one day, about twenty years or so ago, and said: 'Look here, my buggy business is going to pass. I'd like to make your cars in Canada.'

"I'd never seen him before but I liked his looks and said: 'AH right, I'm interested in that sort of

thing. Three months later McGregor opened the plant.

I remember that conversation. We were standing in the alley bock of our first plant over on Mack avenue. That's how the Canadian company started.

I never thought anything about the tariff. I never have in starting a plant."

"What about Manchester?" I asked. "I started the plant in Manchester," said Mr. Ford, "to put industry into the country. Tariff had nothing to do with it. All our plants have been located to serve *different localities, like the twenty or more we have in the United States. I would want to manufacture in Canada for the same reason,"

"And you believe the tariff is not a factor in locating .in Canada" "It is not with me," replied Mr. Ford. * . .

Mr. Ford was silent .for a moment, thinking. The stockholder," he said at last, "is the only person who may lose in the tariff reduction, and he's had enough anyway. We shouldn't worry about stockholders. They don't deserve profits; they don't earn."

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

Well, my hon. friend may live so near the border that he has some slang expression descriptive of it.

Now I want to touch for a moment on the reduction in income tax, and in dealing with this question I desire to read just a brief extract from an address delivered in England by the Right Hon. Lord Decies, D.S.O., director of the Income Taxpayers' Society. The address is reported in the Daily Mail Yearbook at page 20, and reads in part:

The present Chancellor of the Exchequer, the Right Hon Winston Churchill, in his biography of his father, Lord Randolph Churchill (also a Chancellor of the Exchequer) says: "He (Lord Randolph) desired

especially to diminish those taxes which fell upon the lower middle class. He laboured to transfer the burdens, so far as possible, from comforts to luxuries, and from necessaries to pleasures. He applied much more closely than his .predecessors that fundamental principle of democratic finance-the adjusting of taxation to the citzen's ability to pay." There can be

The Budget-Mr. Bothwell

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

He can verify it if he likes. It is an article compiled by Charles Vining. It is probably only fair to state in connection with this Ford industry that it may be an exceptional kind of automobile plant. But the other plants that are manufacturing in Canada are making automobiles with wheels, rubber tires and equipment to some extent similar to that used in the making of Ford cars. There is of course a difference. There are a number of different cars made in Canada, and other plants may have to import certain parts. But if Henry Ford is correct, as we believe he is, in the statement that wages in Canada are no higher than they are in the United States, and we have the raw material in this country just as they have across the line, then if the other manufacturing concerns in Canada are not able to produce at a profit with the protection that is still afforded them after the reduction has been made, they must be poorly organized or poorly managed. There must be inefficiency somewhere. If the Ford manufacturing concern, getting at least 85 per cent of its raw material in Canada, is able to compete with the Ford companies in the United States, then the other automobile factories here should be able to do the same with a protective tariff of 20 per cent.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

I do not care whether he is president of the Ford Motor Works or not. We know Ford is a manufacturer of automobiles; that he has been in this business since the Ford plants were started, and that he has an interest in the Ford plant in Ontario. I presume he can speak with authority as to how the plant there was established.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
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May 3, 1926

Mr. BOTHWELL:

That $2,962,334 is used to pay Dominion income tax, customs duties, sales tax on purchases, provincial and municipal taxes, Canadian Government Merchant Marine and Canadian National Railways-as shown in his own publication.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Full View Permalink