Alexander Bell PATTERSON

PATTERSON, Alexander Bell

Parliamentary Career

August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
SC
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
SC
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
June 18, 1962 - February 6, 1963
SC
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
April 8, 1963 - September 8, 1965
SC
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
November 8, 1965 - April 23, 1968
SC
  Fraser Valley (British Columbia)
October 30, 1972 - May 9, 1974
PC
  Fraser Valley East (British Columbia)
July 8, 1974 - March 26, 1979
PC
  Fraser Valley East (British Columbia)
May 22, 1979 - December 14, 1979
PC
  Fraser Valley East (British Columbia)
February 18, 1980 - July 9, 1984
PC
  Fraser Valley East (British Columbia)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 236)


April 13, 1984

Mr. Patterson:

Only!

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FOR SKI RESORTS
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March 15, 1984

Mr. Alex Patterson (Fraser Valley East):

Mr. Speaker, the Bill we have before us is very light and short. The body of the Bill is contained on one page about eight inches by eleven inches. Even though it is light and very short, that is not the effect it is going to have upon the Canadian people. Its weight -will substantially add to the burden of debt which rests upon 'the shoulders of Canadians today. The effects will span the years and enchain our children and our children's children for generations to come,

I have lost count of the times I have heard Liberal spokesmen declare that their intention was and is to exercise restraint and reduce the deficit. However, like most of the predictions made in so many areas, the announced goals were seldom, if ever, realized. In seeking borrowing authority for the unprecedented amount of $29.55 billion in this Bill before us, the Government has reduced its diminishing credibility to minus zero.

I listened with interest this morning to the speech of the Hon. Member for Willowdale (Mr. Peterson). He stated that we in the Progressive Conservative Party have been asking for the impossible in requesting reduced deficits. Why, then, has that been promised so often by the Liberals? Apparently they had no more intention of reducing the deficit and exercising restraint than they had when they promised to keep the price of gasoline lower than that which was predicted by the Conservative Government several years ago.

The Government is asking for authority to borrow $29.55 billion. This is the eighth time the Government has come before this Parliament to request such authority. Bill C-30 was for $12 billion. Bill C-59 was for $14 billion. Bill C- 111 was for $6.6 billion. Bill C-125 was for $7 billion. Bill C-128 was for $4 billion. Bill C-143 was for $19 billion. Bill C-151 was for $10.71 billion. Now, Mr. Speaker, we have the unconscionable Bill C-21 requesting $29.55 billion. This is a total of $102 billion requested in this Parliament.

As has been underlined by several of my colleagues in the course of debate, the amount requested in this Bill is far in excess of the amount required to meet the Government's commitments. There has been no clear reason given why the request has been made or for what purposes the money will be used. The Government's spokespersons, including the Minister of Finance (Mr. Lalonde), have loudly declared that economic recovery is the prevailing trend today. I suggest that the evidence points to the contrary. I think it is safe to say that any seeming degree of recovery is, at the very best, exceedingly fragile. Furthermore, unemployment as of January this year stands at 11.2 per cent. Manufacturing is at 70.5 per cent of capacity and business and farming bankruptcies continue at an alarming rate. Farm income is declining. These facts do not indicate or support in any way the claim that recovery is a continuing reality.

I would like to call attention to the report of the Conference Board of January, 1984. It points out that the Canadian economy will experience four quarters of negative growth in 1985. The rate of job creation will slow over the course of 1984 and 1985, and will be negative in the last half of 1984. As a consequence, unemployment will fall to 10.8 per cent this summer and then rise to 11.3 per cent by the end of next year. It points out that the federal deficit is seen as remaining in the $27 billion range on a national accounts basis. Short-term interest rates will rise by two percentage points between now and the end of 1985. Capital investment will continue to be weak or negative. I do not believe there is anything in those figures that would indicate that the recovery is even holding, let alone improving across the country.

I suggest that the Bill in its current form is completely unacceptable. While we can acknowledge the necessity to meet the legitimate costs of a responsible government, we cannot meekly permit the Government to build up a surplus to finance unknown activities at taxpayers' expense.

When we look at the entire picture, I cannot understand how the Government has the colossal nerve to come before this Parliament and ask us to support a measure that will impose such a further horrendous deficit upon the Canadian people and demand that they contribute another $29.5 billion without indicating what it will be used for or how it will affect our country.

If we could see that these vast expenditures were improving the lot of the Canadian people, perhaps it would be entirely different. However, the figures that I and many of my colleagues have presented to the House would indicate that, to the contrary, it is simply a matter of pouring money into a hole in the ground. Rather than seeing an improvement so that our people are happy, contented, prosperous and confident, I believe when people see the activities of the Government and the demands it is making on the taxpayers of this country, they become increasingly depressed, to the point where we find that the social effects upon Canadian society because of the eco-

March 15, 1984

nomic situation are resulting in disaster as far as many people in our country are concerned.

1 repeat that there would be some reason for hope if there was an improvement but the Government is placing an increasing burden of debt upon Canadians and putting succeeding generations in a position where they will not be able to carry this debt plus a possibly increased debt in the future if, God forbid, a government like that remains in office for any further length of time.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BORROWING AUTHORITY ACT, 1984-85 MEASURE TO ESTABLISH
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February 22, 1984

Mr. Alex Patterson (Fraser Valley East):

Mr. Speaker, it is my intention to underline the continuing tragedy of unemployment. Inability to find employment to provide for one's own needs and those of one's dependants is a demoralizing experience. It undermines one's self esteem and results in frustration and fear.

Unemployment is of particular concern to the youth in this country in that the rate for this group stands at over 20 per cent. This is a tragedy of unconscionable proportion. Starting out with visions of service, achievement, and financial security, young people are shocked to discover that their services are not wanted. Their expectations are shattered, and their hopes dashed.

Our young people are now suffering a second blow. Unable to find employment, many have decided to return to classrooms rather than remain idle. Recently we debated the lack of funding for post-secondary education. Tuition fees are rising dramatically, and those with limited financial resources are unable to pursue their studies. As well, many educational institutions are raising entrance requirements, and now, suffering a double-whammy, many of our young people are facing a situation which will have a shattering effect on their future.

The Government, Mr. Speaker, has been delinquent in not providing permanent employment opportunities for our youth or the economic stimulation that will enable the private sector to create those opportunities.

Topic:   STATEMENTS PURSUANT TO S.O. 21
Subtopic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
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February 10, 1984

1. Since 1975, by year, how many murders took place in Canada?

2. By year, how many murders involved children under the age of 16 years?

3. Since 1975, by year, how many rapes/sexual assaults on children took place?

4. In the case of child murders, by year, how many involved sexual assault on the victim?

5. (a) Since 1975, by year, in the case of child murders, how many individuals were charged with (i) first degree murder (ii) second degree murder (iii) manslaughter and, in each case, what was the conviction relating to the charge (b) how many individuals (i) charged (ii) convicted had previous criminal records relating to sexual assaults on children?

6. Since 1975, by year, how many crimes of (a) murder (b) rape/sexual assault were committed by individuals released from penitentiary under (i) mandatory supervision (ii) weekend/day passes under the temporary release program (iii) parole?

7. Since 1975, for those persons charged with rape/sexual assault, how many (a) were released on bail (b) committed crimes relating to sexual assault while on bail?

Return tabled.

Topic:   ROUTINE PROCEEDINGS
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS ON THE ORDER PAPER
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February 3, 1984

Mr. Patterson:

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of order. I always felt that it was not in order to impute motives. Here we have a speaker on the Government side, a Parliamentary Secretary, engaging in an effort to besmirch the activities and interests of the Opposition in order to try to save his own political hide.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT ORDERS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS OF SUPPLY
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