Sydney Chilton MEWBURN

MEWBURN, The Hon. Sydney Chilton, P.C., Q.C., C.M.G.

Personal Data

Party
Conservative (1867-1942)
Constituency
Hamilton East (Ontario)
Birth Date
December 4, 1863
Deceased Date
August 11, 1956
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Chilton_Mewburn
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=03a43e36-d9db-4e99-be91-529783d83478&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
lawyer

Parliamentary Career

December 17, 1917 - October 4, 1921
UNION
  Hamilton East (Ontario)
  • Minister of Militia and Defence (October 12, 1917 - January 15, 1920)
December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
CON
  Hamilton East (Ontario)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
CON
  Hamilton East (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 5 of 15)


June 20, 1922

Mr. MEWBURN:

Question.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   INLAND REVENUE
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May 22, 1922

Mr. MEWBURN:

It would only mean moving machinery from Quebec to Lindsay.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MILITIA AND DEFENCE
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May 22, 1922

Mr. MEWBURN:

Mr. Chairman, I

agree with the minister that this item should have been placed among the miscellaneous votes, but I do not criticise its inclusion in this vote.

For the information of some members of the House who were not then members,! may say that in 1920 a committee of the House [DOT] was appointed to consider the question of Canadian battlefields' war memorials. That committee sat for some time, took evidence, and made a report to the House, recommending that certain memorials be erected in France and Belgium. Eight sites were selected as follows: No. 1, St. Julien; No. 2, Passchendaele; No. 3, Observatory Ridge; No. 4 Vimy Ridge; No. 5, Drury Crossroads; No. 6, Bourlon wood; No. 7, Cour-celette; No. 8, Hospital Wood.

Subsequently a commission was appointed consisting of the Hon. . Mr. Lemieux, General Sir Richard Turner, Colonel Leonard, Senator Turriff and myself, a purely voluntary commission, to consider the erection of these war memorials. A competition was held for designs, open to architects and sculptors all over Canada, and very complete rules were printed and issued. Something like 160 competitors submitted designs. The assessors appointed to consider those designs were, Professor C. H. Reilly, representing the Royal Institute of British Architects; M. Paul P. Creats, representing the Societe Centraie des Architects (Paris); and Mr. Frank Darling, representing the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada. Those assessors selected seventeen designs

Supply-Militia

for the second stage, and from those two awards were made, one to Mr. Allward of Toronto, the other to Mr. Clemenshaw of Regina.

The memorial designed by Mr. Allward, of which a photograph has been on exhibition, and I think is now in the Speaker's room, was proposed by the commission to be erected at Vimy. It is on a large and magnificent scale and has received great commendation throughout not only the length and breadth of this country but of England and France.

Working in conjunction with the Imperial War Graves Commission, we discussed the perpetuation of the names of Canada's missing. As you are all aware, the Imperial War Graves Commission is a body incorporated by Royal charter of which the Prince of Wales is chairman, and with which all the overseas dominions are associated. They are charged with perpetuating their quota within the war cemeteries by a headstone of simple design placed over the grave of every officer, noncommissioned officer and man. It has been unanimously decided that we should consecrate the names of Canada's missing within this one large memorial which we propose erecting at Vimy. Those names at the present time, I regret to say, run to about nineteen thousand.

The other seven memorials, exactly similar in design but on a very much smaller scale, will be erected at the other seven points. Land has been acquired at the eight different points at very low cost, one of the areas having been presented to the Canadian Government. General Hughes has been over there as engineer in charge; he has laid out the plans for the grounds, arranged for the grading of roads, and so on. We are hoping at an early day to complete the contracts for the erection of these memorials. I may say that this vote was brought into the House by myself in 1920 and again in 1921; it is now again presented this session. It was strongly recommended by the committee of the House appointed in 1920, and it has been practically a revote ever since. As I have already stated, this work is being carried on voluntarily iby the gentlemen whose names have been given. We hope this vote will pass the House unanimously, in order that we may be enabled to make some headway with what we look upon as the least this country can do to perpetuate the deeds of heroism of those Canadians who fell in France and Flanders.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MILITIA AND DEFENCE
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May 22, 1922

Mr. MEWBURN:

I am glad the Prime Minister referred to that; there is just one word that I omitted to say. We took expert evidence as to the location of these memorials from all the officers, from the corps commander down, and in the decisions we arrived at we have been backed up by their opinion as well as by that of Professor Reilly, who went over and viewed the sites. The unanimous opinion was that the large memorial ought to go to Vimy. Many of the army officers held that Vimy was by no means the most important battle that was fought by the Canadian corps; yet it is agreed that there is something distinctive regarding Vimy that comes very close to the hearts of Canadians. We have a small site there and we feel that sufficient of that ground should be acquired; we trust that Parliament will approve whatever recommendation we may finally make with that idea in view. The base of this memorial will occupy very nearly an acre of ground, and we hope we can acquire at a reasonable price certain portions of Vimy to perpetuate for all time the outstanding features of Canada's exploits on that ridge. That, I think, is what the Prime Minister referred to. I may say that all the members of the commission are unanimously of that opinion, and General Hughes has agreed to continue the negotiations with the French Government and some of the owners with a view to seeing just what land we can acquire for that purpose.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MILITIA AND DEFENCE
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May 22, 1922

Mr. MEWBURN:

What has the United States got a navy for?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NAVAL SERVICE
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