John CHARLTON

CHARLTON, John

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Norfolk North (Ontario)
Birth Date
February 3, 1829
Deceased Date
February 11, 1910
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_M._Charlton
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=03119541-a274-44e2-ab4a-6d6f6b3c6d5a&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, farmer, lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

October 12, 1872 - January 2, 1874
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
January 22, 1874 - August 16, 1878
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
September 17, 1878 - May 18, 1882
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
June 20, 1882 - January 15, 1887
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
February 22, 1887 - February 3, 1891
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
March 5, 1891 - April 24, 1896
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
June 23, 1896 - October 9, 1900
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)
November 7, 1900 - September 29, 1904
LIB
  Norfolk North (Ontario)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 132)


July 13, 1955

Mr. Charlton:

I think they have been more than patient in this particular case. It has been necessary for them to spend a considerable amount of money for the upkeep of this road, almost purely because of this repair depot.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED POLICY FOR STABILIZATION OF INDUSTRY
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July 13, 1955

Mr. Charlton:

I should like to direct the attention of the minister to a matter which was first brought to his attention in a letter dated June 29, 1953. This has to do with a road into No. 6 repair depot at Dunnville, Ontario, which is a mile and nine-tenths

long. Because of the heavy truck traffic into the repair depot the township has been put to considerable expense for many years in keeping this road in repair.

This letter was written to the department by the clerk of the township on June 29, 1953, pointing out that over the preceding eight years the expense of maintaining this road had been some $16,000 and indicating that during 1954 it would be necessary for them to spend an estimated $6,200 to bring this road back to a reasonable condition. They were pleading with the government for a grant to help them under the circumstances.

This is merely a township road, and if it were not for No. 6 repair depot and this heavy truck traffic over the road the cost to the township of maintaining the road would not be great. The township did not hear anything from the department for a considerable length of time, although a representative of the department visited the officials of the township and offered them what I consider to be the paltry sum of $1,500 as a grant toward the upkeep of the road. This was in relation to an expenditure of well over $22,000. From that point until the present time the matter has been receiving the attention of the department.

I think I have been more than fair, due to the fact that I have not had an answer. No decision has been arrived at over a two-year period, and I think the department should be able to come up with some kind of an answer, either saying they are not going to give them anything or they are going to grant a reasonable amount for the upkeep of this road. The last letter I wrote to the minister was dated April 21 of this year. Previous to that I had written on January 18 and had a reply. As of today I have had no reply, though I have had several telephone conversations with the departmental officials. Surely it does not take this long to make a decision of this kind.

For sometime the story was going around Dunnville that this repair depot was going to be turned over to war assets and disposed of, but later we found out that was not true. We understand from correspondence that it is not going to be turned over to war assets but will be maintained by the air force. If that is the case surely it should not require this length of time to arrive at a decision on this matter.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED POLICY FOR STABILIZATION OF INDUSTRY
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July 13, 1955

Mr. Charllon:

I do not think the minister is quite fair when he says the department is considered fair game.

Topic:   AGRICULTURE
Subtopic:   SUGGESTED POLICY FOR STABILIZATION OF INDUSTRY
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May 1, 1908

Mr. CHARLTON.

Will to-morrow ever

come?

To-morrow never did come. The Bill died a natural death. It was an abortion when introduced, and it never came into being.

I wish to say a few words with regard to the report of 1892. I have alluded to some of the recommendations of the commission of that day and to some of their statements regarding what they found in the service. I find here an interesting letter from Mr. Le Sueur, one of the best known and oldest civil servants in Ottawa who has since left the service. In this these words lie characterizes the service at that time :

Politics I need not define. We have it with us always, and we know what it means. The present question is, how does the intrusion of politics affect the public service? It affects it in many wavs: '

1. By crowding it with unnecessary hands.

2. By introducing into it, at times, inefficient or other unsuitable persons.

3. Bv interfering with the due course of promotion.

4. Bv interfering with the exercise of necessary discipline.

Topic:   EDITION
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October 10, 1903

Mr. CHARLTON.

Section 12 of the Dominion Elections Act provides :

12. None of the persons following shall be appointed returning officers or deputy returning officers, election clerks or poll clerks ;

(a.) Members of the Queen's Privy Council for Canada or of the Executive Council of any province ;

(b.) Members of the Senate or members of the legislative council of any province ;

(c.) Members of the House of Commons or members of the legislative assembly of any province ;

(d.) Ministers, priests or ecclesiastics of any religious faith or worship ; .

(e.) Judges of the courts of superior, civil or criminal jurisdiction, or judges of any county or district court, insolvent court or admiralty court ;

(f.) Persons who have served in the parliament of Canada in the session immediately preceding the election, or in the then present session of parliament ;

(g.) Persons who have been found guilty by the House of Commons, or by any court for the trial of controverted elections, or other competent tribunal of any offence or dereliction of duty in violation of this Act, or of an offence in violation of a provincial Act relating to elections, or of the Act to disfranchise voters who have taken bribes, being chapter 14 of the Statutes of 1894 ;

(h.) Persons who have been convicted of an indictable offence.

And to this will be added subsection I as given in this section 4.

Topic:   IQ, 1903
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