March 26, 1930 (16th Parliament, 4th Session)

CON

Alexander Duncan McRae

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. McRAE:

If the hon. member will hear me through he will find that I am going to touch on the one vital point in the Australian treaty. I say now as I have said before, sir, that I do not believe that we should attempt
'Mr McRae.]
to exchange any commodity which interferes with the basic products of either county'. Now, as I was saying, the importations of redwood lumber into Australia last year were
50,000,000 feet-$1,000,000 more business, whirn without any special concession on the part of the Commonwealth of Australia might be diverted to Canada.
I now come to another industry to which I previously referred, and which has profited very materially by the Australian treaty. It is the fishing business on the coast, and particularly the canned salmon. Its importance is worthy of notice. In 1926 the United States shipped to Australia 132,000 cases, while we shipped 192.000; in 1929 the United States shipments had fallen to 92,000, while ours had increased to 217,000. It is rather interesting to note in that connection that we are as yet supplying but a small part of the entire importation of fish products into the Australian market. True, we have now about 694 per cent of the business in canned salmon in that market.
Summing uip the three commodities, paper, lumber, fish-

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY AMENDMENTS TO MOTION OF MINISTER OF FINANCE FOR COMMITTEE
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