March 26, 1930 (16th Parliament, 4th Session)

LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

We have no standing
order covering this particular situation. But the following appears in Bourinot at page 382: If a member who has heard the question put in the Commons should vote inadvertently, contrary to his intention, he cannot be allowed to correct the mistake, but his vote must remain as first recorded.
By our standing order 1 the rales of the British House of Commons are followed when there is no special standing order of this house to govern a particular case. The British parliament has allowed the correction of a vote, and this point is covered by Campion, the latest authority, at page 156, who says:
It also occasionally happens that a member in the course of a division finds himself voting in the wrong lobby. If he defers raising the matter until after the division, the inference from the precedents is that his request for the correction of his error will be refused. If, on the other hand, he proceeds to vote in the other lobby as well, there are precedents in favour of the rectification of the division list at his request, made at a later opportunity on the same day or even on a subsequent day.
Therefore, the motion would appear to be in order. Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt the motion?

Topic:   DIVORCE COURT FOR ONTARIO
Subtopic:   MOTION TO RECTIFY DIVISION LIST RECORDING VOTE ON MARCH 25
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